Publications by authors named "Sibel Ciftci"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Genome-wide CRISPR screens reveal synthetic lethal interaction between CREBBP and EP300 in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

Cell Death Dis 2021 04 28;12(5):419. Epub 2021 Apr 28.

Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common type of aggressive lymphoid malignancy and a highly heterogeneous disease. In this study, we performed whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing, and a genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9-knockout screen to study an activated B-cell-like DLBCL cell line (RC-K8). We identified a distinct pattern of genetic essentialities in RC-K8, including a dependency on CREBBP and MDM2. The dependency on CREBBP is associated with a balanced translocation involving EP300, which results in a truncated form of the protein that lacks the critical histone acetyltransferase (HAT) domain. The synthetic lethal interaction between CREBBP and EP300 genes, two frequently mutated epigenetic modulators in B-cell lymphoma, was further validated in the previously published CRISPR-Cas9 screens and inhibitor assays. Our study suggests that integration of the unbiased functional screen results with genomic and transcriptomic data can identify both common and unique druggable vulnerabilities in DLBCL and histone acetyltransferases inhibition could be a therapeutic option for CREBBP or EP300 mutated cases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41419-021-03695-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8080727PMC
April 2021

Sub-attomole detection of HIV-1 using padlock probes and rolling circle amplification combined with microfluidic affinity chromatography.

Biosens Bioelectron 2020 Oct 26;166:112442. Epub 2020 Jul 26.

Division of Nanobiotechnology, Department of Protein Science, Science for Life Laboratory, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Solna, Sweden. Electronic address:

Despite significant progress in diagnostics and disease management during the past decades, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections are still responsible for nearly 1 million deaths every year, mostly in resource-limited settings. Thus, novel, accurate and cost-effective tools for viral load monitoring become crucial to allow specific diagnostics and the effective monitoring of the associated antiviral therapies. Herein, we report an effective combination of a (1) padlock probe (PLP)-mediated rolling circle amplification (RCA) bioassay and an (2) agarose bead-based microfluidic device for the affinity chromatography-based capture and detection of RCA products (RCPs) pre-labelled simultaneously with biotin and an organic fluorophore. This method allowed the efficient capture of ~1 μm-sized RCPs followed by their quantification either as discrete signals or an average fluorescence signal, thus being compatible with both high-resolution imaging for maximum sensitivity as well as simpler optical detection setups. A limit of detection < 30 fM was obtained for HIV-1 synthetic target with just a single round of RCA, comparable to recently reported procedures requiring technically complex amplification strategies such as hyperbranching and/or enzymatic digestion/amplification. Furthermore, targeting a set of five conserved regions in the HIV-1 gag gene, the method could specifically detect HIV-1 in 293T cell culture supernatants, as well as a set of 11 HIV-1 NIH reference samples with four different subtypes. The reported method provides simplicity of operation, unique versatility of signal transduction (i.e. average or discrete signals), and potential coupling with previously reported miniaturized photodetectors. These combined features hold promise for bringing RCA-based molecular diagnostics closer to the point-of-care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2020.112442DOI Listing
October 2020

The sweet detection of rolling circle amplification: Glucose-based electrochemical genosensor for the detection of viral nucleic acid.

Biosens Bioelectron 2020 Mar 30;151:112002. Epub 2019 Dec 30.

Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University, Sweden. Electronic address:

Herein, an isothermal padlock probe-based assay for the simple and portable detection of pathogens coupled with a glucose oxidase (GOx)-based electrochemical readout is reported. Infectious diseases remain a constant threat on a global scale, as in recurring pandemics. Rapid and portable diagnostics hold the promise to tackle the spreading of diseases and decentralising healthcare to point-of-care needs. Ebola, a hypervariable RNA virus causing fatalities of up to 90% for recent outbreaks in Africa, demands immediate attention for bedside diagnostics. The design of the demonstrated assay consists of a rolling circle amplification (RCA) technique, responsible for the generation of nucleic acid amplicons as RCA products (RCPs). The RCPs are generated on magnetic beads (MB) and subsequently, connected via streptavidin-biotin bonds to GOx. The enzymatic catalysis of glucose by the bound GOx allows for an indirect electrochemical measurement of the DNA target. The RCPs generated on the surface of the MB were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, and among other experimental conditions such as the type of buffer, temperature, concentration of GOx, sampling and measurement time were evaluated for the optimum electrochemical detection. Accordingly, 125 μg mL of GOx with 5 mM glucose using phosphate buffer saline (PBS), monitored for 1 min were selected as the ideal conditions. Finally, we assessed the analytical performance of the biosensing strategy by using clinical samples of Ebola virus from patients. Overall, this work provides a proof-of-concept bioassay for simple and portable molecular diagnostics of emerging pathogens using electrochemical detection, especially in resource-limited settings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2019.112002DOI Listing
March 2020

Digital Rolling Circle Amplification-Based Detection of Ebola and Other Tropical Viruses.

J Mol Diagn 2020 02 16;22(2):272-283. Epub 2019 Dec 16.

Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University, Solna, Sweden. Electronic address:

Emerging tropical viruses have caused serious outbreaks during the recent years, such as Ebola virus (EBOV) in 2014 and the most recent in 2018 to 2019 in Congo. Thus, immediate diagnostic attention is demanded at the point of care in resource-limited settings, because the performance and the operational parameters of conventional EBOV testing are limited. Especially, their sensitivity, specificity, and coverage of other tropical disease viruses make them unsuitable for diagnostic at the point of care. Here, a padlock probe (PLP)-based rolling circle amplification (RCA) method for the detection of EBOV is presented. For this, a set of PLPs, separately targeting the viral RNA and complementary RNA of all seven EBOV genes, was used in the RCA assay and validated on virus isolates from cell culture. The assay was then translated for testing clinical samples, and simultaneous detection of both EBOV RNA types was demonstrated. For increased sensitivity, the RCA products were enriched on a simple and pump-free microfluidic chip. Because PLPs and RCA are inherently multiplexable, we demonstrate the extension of the probe panel for the simultaneous detection of the tropical viruses Ebola, Zika, and Dengue. The demonstrated high specificity, sensitivity, and multiplexing capability in combination with the digital quantification rendered the assay a promising diagnostic tool toward tropical virus detection at the point of care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmoldx.2019.10.014DOI Listing
February 2020

A novel mutation tolerant padlock probe design for multiplexed detection of hypervariable RNA viruses.

Sci Rep 2019 02 27;9(1):2872. Epub 2019 Feb 27.

Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University, SE- 171 65, Solna, Sweden.

The establishment of a robust detection platform for RNA viruses still remains a challenge in molecular diagnostics due to their high mutation rates. Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is one such RNA avian virus with a hypervariable genome and multiple genotypes. Classical approaches like virus isolation, serology, immunoassays and RT-PCR are cumbersome, and limited in terms of specificity and sensitivity. Padlock probes (PLPs) are known for allowing the detection of multiple nucleic acid targets with high specificity, and in combination with Rolling circle amplification (RCA) have permitted the development of versatile pathogen detection assays. In this work, we aimed to detect hypervariable viruses by developing a novel PLP design strategy capable of tolerating mutations while preserving high specificity by targeting several moderately conserved regions and using degenerate bases. For this, we designed nine padlock probes based on the alignment of 335 sequences covering both Class I and II NDV. Our PLP design showed high coverage and specificity for the detection of eight out of ten reported genotypes of Class II NDV field isolated strains, yielding a detection limit of less than ten copies of viral RNA. Further taking advantage of the multiplex capability of PLPs, we successfully extended the assay for the simultaneous detection of three poultry RNA viruses (NDV, IBV and AIV) and combined it with a paper based microfluidic enrichment read-out for digital quantification. In summary, our novel PLP design addresses the current issue of tolerating mutations of highly emerging virus strains with high sensitivity and specificity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-39854-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6393471PMC
February 2019

Silica bead-based microfluidic device with integrated photodiodes for the rapid capture and detection of rolling circle amplification products in the femtomolar range.

Biosens Bioelectron 2019 Mar 18;128:68-75. Epub 2018 Dec 18.

Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University, SE-171 65 Solna, Sweden. Electronic address:

The rapid and sensitive detection of specific nucleic acid sequences at the point-of-care (PoC) is becoming increasingly in demand for a variety of emergent biomedical applications ranging from infectious disease diagnostics to the screening of antimicrobial resistance. To meet such demand, considerable efforts have been invested towards the development of portable and integrated analytical devices combining microfluidics with miniaturized signal transducers. Here, we demonstrate the combination of rolling circle amplification (RCA)-based nucleic acid amplification with an on-chip size-selective trapping of amplicons on silica beads (~8 nL capture chamber) coupled with a thin-film photodiode (200 × 200 µm area) fluorescence readout. Parameters such as the flow rate of the amplicon solution and trapping time were optimized as well as the photodiode measurement settings, providing minimum detection limits below 0.5 fM of targeted nucleic acids and requiring only 5 μL of pre-amplified sample. Finally, we evaluated the analytical performance of our approach by benchmarking it against a commercial instrument for RCA product (RCP) quantification and further investigated the effect of the number of RCA cycles and elongation times (ranging from 10 to 120 min). Moreover, we provide a demonstration of the application for diagnostic purposes by detecting RNA from influenza and Ebola viruses, thus highlighting its suitability for integrated PoC systems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2018.12.004DOI Listing
March 2019

In Situ Detection of Adenovirus DNA and mRNA in Individual Cells.

Curr Protoc Microbiol 2018 05 27;49(1):e54. Epub 2018 Apr 27.

Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.

Infection by DNA viruses such as human adenoviruses (HAdVs) causes a high-level accumulation of viral DNA and mRNA in the cell population. However, the average viral DNA and mRNA content in a heterogeneous cell population does not inevitably reflect the abundance in individual cells. As the vast majority of virus infection studies is carried out using standard experimental procedures with heterogeneous cell populations, there is a need for a method allowing simultaneous detection and quantitative analysis of viral genome accumulation and gene expression in individual infected cells within a population. This article describes a padlock probe-based rolling-circle amplification protocol that allows simultaneous detection of HAdV type 5 (HAdV-5) DNA and various virus-encoded mRNAs, as well as quantitative analysis of HAdV-5 DNA copies and mRNA species, in individual cells within a heterogeneous population. This versatile method can be used to detect the extent of pathogenic DNA virus infection in different cell types over prolonged infection times. Furthermore, simultaneous viral DNA and mRNA quantification in individual cells allows identification of cells in which persistent infections may be established. © 2018 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cpmc.54DOI Listing
May 2018

Simultaneous Single-Cell Analysis of Human Adenovirus Type 5 DNA and mRNA Expression Patterns in Lytic and Persistent Infection.

J Virol 2017 06 12;91(11). Epub 2017 May 12.

Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

An efficient adenovirus infection results in high-level accumulation of viral DNA and mRNAs in the infected cell population. However, the average viral DNA and mRNA content in a heterogeneous cell population does not necessarily reflect the same abundance in individual cells. Here, we describe a novel padlock probe-based rolling-circle amplification technique that enables simultaneous detection and analysis of human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV-5) genomic DNA and virus-encoded mRNAs in individual infected cells. We demonstrate that the method is applicable for detection and quantification of HAdV-5 DNA and mRNAs in short-term infections in human epithelial cells and in long-term infections in human B lymphocytes. Single-cell evaluation of these infections revealed high heterogeneity and unique cell subpopulations defined by differential viral DNA content and mRNA expression. Further, our single-cell analysis shows that the specific expression pattern of viral and mRNA splice variants is linked to HAdV-5 DNA content in the individual cells. Furthermore, we show that expression of a mature form of the HAdV-5 histone-like protein VII affects virus genome detection in HAdV-5-infected cells. Collectively, padlock probes combined with rolling-circle amplification should be a welcome addition to the method repertoire for the characterization of the molecular details of the HAdV life cycle in individual infected cells. Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) have been extensively used as model systems to study various aspects of eukaryotic gene expression and genome organization. The vast majority of the HAdV studies are based on standard experimental procedures carried out using heterogeneous cell populations, where data averaging often masks biological differences. As every cell is unique, characteristics and efficiency of an HAdV infection can vary from cell to cell. Therefore, the analysis of HAdV gene expression and genome organization would benefit from a method that permits analysis of individual infected cells in the heterogeneous cell population. Here, we show that the padlock probe-based rolling-circle amplification method can be used to study concurrent viral DNA accumulation and mRNA expression patterns in individual HAdV-5-infected cells. Hence, this versatile method can be applied to detect the extent of infection and virus gene expression changes in different HAdV-5 infections.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00166-17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5432871PMC
June 2017

Silica core/conjugated polymer shell particles via seeded Knoevenagel dispersion polymerization - laser action in whispering gallery mode resonators.

Chem Commun (Camb) 2016 Dec;52(99):14222-14225

DWI - Leibniz Institute for Interactive Materials, RWTH Aachen University, Forckenbeckstraße 50, 52076 Aachen, Germany.

Here, we present a seeded Knoevenagel dispersion polymerization to generate hybrid particles with a conjugated polymer shell on inorganic silica cores. This seeded dispersion polymerization facilitates the generation of core-shell particles, which exhibit whispering gallery mode lasing. The lasing threshold decreases while the spectral range of emission increases with increasing shell thickness. This novel seeded Knoevenagel dispersion polymerization opens up a facile and metal free pathway towards single particle conjugated polymer lasers on the micrometer scale.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c6cc08089hDOI Listing
December 2016

Colloidal Crystal Lasers from Monodisperse Conjugated Polymer Particles via Bottom-Up Coassembly in a Sol-Gel Matrix.

ACS Nano 2016 11 31;10(11):10195-10201. Epub 2016 Oct 31.

DWI-Leibniz Institute for Interactive Materials, RWTH Aachen University , Forckenbeckstraße 50, 52076 Aachen, Germany.

The potential of colloidal crystals for applications in optics and photonics has been recognized since the description of spontaneous self-assembly of monodisperse colloids into periodic opaline geometries. Provided with a laser gain medium, these direct assemblies generate optical feedback and have prospective use as lasers or frequency converters; however, problems associated with the colloidal crystal integrity and low loading fractions of the gain medium in the self-assembled resonator structure have prevented their realization to date. Here, we circumvent these problems by synthesizing monodisperse conjugated polymer colloids, which consist entirely of gain medium. We coassemble these colloids together with a sol-gel precursor to achieve encapsulated photonic crystals, which can be applied via inkjet printing. These conjugated polymer photonic crystals exhibit single line laser emission upon optical pumping. This technique circumvents time-consuming micro- and nanofabrication steps as well as error-prone backfilling and etching procedures, providing an effortless way to generate laser geometries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsnano.6b05538DOI Listing
November 2016

Opposite expression of CYP51A1 and its natural antisense transcript AluCYP51A1 in adenovirus type 37 infected retinal pigmented epithelial cells.

FEBS Lett 2015 May 20;589(12):1383-8. Epub 2015 Apr 20.

Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala University, Husargatan 3, BMC, Box 582, 75123 Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address:

Cytochrome P450 family member CYP51A1 is a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis whose deregulation is implicated in numerous diseases, including retinal degeneration. Here we describe that HAdV-37 infection leads to downregulation of CYP51A1 expression and overexpression of its antisense non-coding Alu element (AluCYP51A1) in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. This change in gene expression is associated with a reversed accumulation of a positive histone mark at the CYP51A1 and AluCYP51A1 promoters. Further, transient AluCYP51A1 RNA overexpression correlates with reduced CYP51A1 mRNA accumulation. Collectively, our data suggest that AluCYP51A1 might control CYP51A1 gene expression in HAdV-37-infected RPE cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.febslet.2015.04.018DOI Listing
May 2015
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