Dr Sibauk Vivaldo Bieb, MBBS, MAHM - National Department of Health - Executive Manager - Public Health

Dr Sibauk Vivaldo Bieb

MBBS, MAHM

National Department of Health

Executive Manager - Public Health

Port Moresby, National Capital District | Papua New Guinea

Main Specialties: Public Health

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-3360-0638


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Dr Sibauk Vivaldo Bieb, MBBS, MAHM - National Department of Health - Executive Manager - Public Health

Dr Sibauk Vivaldo Bieb

MBBS, MAHM

Introduction

Dr Sibauk Vivaldo Bieb graduated with a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) degree from the University of Papua New Guinea in 1982. He also holds a Master of Arts in Hospital Management degree from the Nuffield Institute of the University of Leeds, United Kingdom (1995). Dr Bieb was also awarded a traineeship certificate in Reproductive Health by Johns Hopkins University, United States of America (1986). He is currently working as the Executive Manager for Public Health at the National Department of Health in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. A strong advocate of professionalism, loyalty, integrity, commitment, innovation and teamwork by health professionals in their service to their people, government and country, he leads the public health team in Papua New Guinea by example. His professional interests include people-centred evidence-based participative planning, health-in-all policy approach to addressing the social determinants of health, health promotion, population-based cost-effective health interventions based on improved access to primary healthcare, capacity building of health professionals, better quality and innovative data gathering, collation, storage, analysis, interpretation and use to drive planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation, and quality service delivery in public health. In addition, he serves as a member of many high level Government Committees including the Senior Executive Management Committee of the National Department of Health that is responsible for the health sector in Papua New Guinea. Dr Bieb has been a member of the World Health Organization Western Pacific Region Program Review Group for Neglected Tropical Diseases since 2013 and has recently been recognised for his contributions by being reappointed for another three (3) years to 2018.

Primary Affiliation: National Department of Health - Port Moresby, National Capital District , Papua New Guinea

Specialties:

Research Interests:


View Dr Sibauk Vivaldo Bieb’s Resume / CV

Education

Sep 1994 - Sep 1995
University of Leeds
Master of Arts in Hospital Management
Nuffield Institute for Health
Feb 1983
University of Papua New Guinea
Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery

Experience

Aug 2011
National Department of Health
Manager - Disease Control
Public Health Division
Sep 2009
Lutheran Medical Services
National Coordinator - Cholera Outbreak Response
Oct 1994
Chevening Scholarship
Postgraduate studies
University of Leeds, United Kingdom
Jul 1991
Gulf Provincial Administration
Chief Executive Officer
Kerema General Hospital
Apr 1988
Central Provincial Administration
Assistant Secretary for Health
Port Moresby
Nov 1986
USAiD Scholarship
Traineeship in Reproductive Health
Johns Hopkins University, Maryland, USA
Feb 1985
Southern Highlands Provincial Administration
Medical Superintendent
Tari District Hospital
Feb 1983
Final Year Medicine Community Medicine Prize
Dux
University of Papua New Guinea
Dec 2012
National Department of Health
Executive Manager - Public Health
Public Health Division

Publications

13Publications

197Reads

387Profile Views

Re-emergence of yaws after single mass azithromycin treatment followed by targeted treatment: a longitudinal study.

Lancet 2018 04 7;391(10130):1599-1607. Epub 2018 Feb 7.

Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(18)30204-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5920722PMC
April 2018
20 Reads
45.217 Impact Factor

Effectiveness of single-dose azithromycin to treat latent yaws: a longitudinal comparative cohort study.

Lancet Glob Health 2017 12 26;5(12):e1268-e1274. Epub 2017 Oct 26.

Barcelona Institute for Global Health, Hospital Clinic-University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), Barcelona, Spain; Centro de Investigação em Saúde de Manhiça (CISM), Maputo, Mozambique; Paediatric Infectious Diseases Unit, Paediatric Department, Hospital Sant Joan de Déu Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(17)30388-1DOI Listing
December 2017
32 Reads

Single-Dose Azithromycin for the Treatment of Haemophilus ducreyi Skin Ulcers in Papua New Guinea.

Clin Infect Dis 2017 Nov;65(12):2085-2090

Barcelona Institute for Global Health, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/cix723DOI Listing
November 2017
18 Reads
8.886 Impact Factor

Health information system strengthening and malaria elimination in Papua New Guinea.

Malar J 2017 07 5;16(1):278. Epub 2017 Jul 5.

PNG Remote Sensing Centre, PO Box 1733, Waterfront, Konedobu, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12936-017-1910-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5499047PMC
July 2017
29 Reads
3.109 Impact Factor

Haemophilus ducreyi DNA is detectable on the skin of asymptomatic children, flies and formites in villages of Papua New Guinea

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 11(5):e0004958

Public Library of Science

Abstract Background Haemophilus ducreyi and Treponema pallidum subsp. pertenue are major causes of leg ulcers in children in Africa and the Pacific Region. We investigated the presence of DNA (PCR positivity) from these bacteria on asymptomatic people, flies, and household linens in an endemic setting. Methodology/Principal findings We performed a cross-sectional study in rural villages of Lihir Island, Papua New Guinea during a yaws elimination campaign. Participants were asymptomatic subjects recruited from households with cases of leg ulcers, and from households without cases of leg ulcers. We rubbed swabs on the intact skin of the leg of asymptomatic individuals, and collected flies and swabs of environmental surfaces. All specimens were tested by PCR for H. ducreyi and T. p. pertenue DNA. Of 78 asymptomatic participants that had an adequate specimen for DNA detection, H. ducreyi-PCR positivity was identified in 16 (21%) and T. p. pertenue-PCR positivity in 1 (1%). In subgroup analyses, H. ducreyi-PCR positivity did not differ in participants exposed or not exposed to a case of H. ducreyi ulcer in the household (24% vs 18%; p = 0.76). Of 17 cultures obtained from asymptomatic participants, 2 (12%) yielded a definitive diagnosis of H. ducreyi, proving skin colonization. Of 10 flies tested, 9 (90%) had H. ducreyi DNA and 5 (50%) had T. p. pertenue DNA. Of 6 bed sheets sampled, 2 (33%) had H. ducreyi DNA and 1 (17%) had T. p. pertenue DNA. Conclusions/Significance This is the first time that H. ducreyi DNA and colonization has been demonstrated on the skin of asymptomatic children and that H. ducreyi DNA and T. p. pertenue DNA has been identified in flies and on fomites. The ubiquity of H. ducreyi in the environment is a contributing factor to the spread of the organism.

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May 2017
4 Reads

Outbreak of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis on Daru Island: an update.

Lancet Respir Med 2016 08 21;4(8):e40. Epub 2016 Jun 21.

National Department of Health, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2213-2600(16)30094-7DOI Listing
August 2016
8 Reads

Human resources for health: lessons from the cholera outbreak in Papua New Guinea.

Western Pac Surveill Response J 2013 Jul-Sep;4(3):9-13. Epub 2013 Jul 3.

World Health Organization, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea . ; School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5365/WPSAR.2013.4.2.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3854099PMC
September 2015
7 Reads

Mass treatment with single-dose azithromycin for yaws.

N Engl J Med 2015 Feb;372(8):703-10

From Lihir Medical Center, International SOS, Newcrest Mining, Lihir Island (O.M., P.M., A.K., R.P.), the Disease Control Branch, National Department of Health, Port Moresby (W.H., S.V.B.), and the Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research, Goroka, Eastern Highland Province (P.S.) - all in Papua New Guinea; Barcelona Institute for Global Health, Barcelona Center for International Health Research, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Barcelona (O.M., S.S., P.L.A., Q.B.); the College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences, James Cook University, Cairns, QLD (R.H.), and the Centre for Social Responsibility in Mining, Sustainable Minerals Institute, University of Queensland, Brisbane (T.G.) - both in Australia; the Departments of Medicine (S.L., C.G.) and Global Health (S.L.), University of Washington, Seattle; the Department of Clinical Research, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London (D.M.); and the Department of Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases, World Health Organization, Geneva (K.A.).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1408586DOI Listing
February 2015
18 Reads
55.873 Impact Factor

Sensitivity and specificity of a rapid point-of-care test for active yaws: a comparative study.

Lancet Glob Health 2014 Jul 31;2(7):e415-21. Epub 2014 May 31.

Lihir Medical Centre-International SOS, Newcrest Mining, Lihir Island, Papua New Guinea; Barcelona Centre for International Health Research, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(14)70231-1DOI Listing
July 2014
24 Reads

Human Resources For Health: Practice And Policy Implications For Emergency Response Arising From The Cholera Outbreak In Papua New Guinea

Human Resources for Health Knowledge Hub 2013

Human Resources for Health Knowledge Hub, Sydney, Australia

SUMMARY Health services in Papua New Guinea experience challenges in the availability and distribution of all cadres of health professionals. In recent years, a large cholera outbreak has placed significant pressure on clinical and public health services. We describe some of the challenges to cholera preparedness and response in this human resource- limited setting, the strategies used to ensure effective cholera management, some lessons learnt as well as issues for public health policy and practice. Cholera Task Forces were useful to establish a clear system of leadership and accountability for cholera outbreak response and ensure efficiencies in each technical area. Cholera outbreak preparedness and response was strongest when human resource and health systems functioned well prior to the outbreak. Communication relied on coordination of existing networks and methods for empowering local leaders and villagers to modify behaviours during the outbreak. In addition to establishing and working towards human resource targets for different cadres of clinical staff, similar targets should be established for all cadres of public health professionals involved in health emergency preparedness and response, and public health services more widely. In line with the national health emergencies plan, the successes of human resource strategies during the cholera outbreak should be built upon through emergency exercises, especially in non-affected provinces. Population needs for all public health professionals involved in health emergency preparedness and response should be mapped and planning should be implemented to increase the numbers in relevant areas. Human resource planning should be integrated with health emergency planning. It is essential to maintain and strengthen the human resource capacities and experiences gained during the cholera outbreak to ensure a more effective response to the next health emergency.

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May 2013
4 Reads