Publications by authors named "Shunyi Qin"

14 Publications

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Selenium enriched 114246 activated the TLR2-NF-κB1 signaling pathway to regulate chicken intestinal β-defensin 1 expression.

Food Funct 2021 May 24. Epub 2021 May 24.

Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Breeding and Healthy Breeding of Tianjin, College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Tianjin Agricultural University, Tianjin, China300384.

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects and potential signaling pathway of selenium-enriched Bacillus subtilis (SEBS) on beta defensin 1 (BD1) expression in chicken intestine. Chinese Huainan Partridge chickens (500 individuals) were randomly allocated into five groups, including control, inorganic Se, B. subtilis, SEBS, and a mixture of Se and B. subtilis (Se-BS). After 56 d of feeding, chicken ileal mucous membranes were harvested to detect differences in expression of BD1. The results indicated that BD1 was produced in intestinal crypt cells and secreted into the lumen through the villi brush border. BD1 was up-regulated in distal ileum segments colonized by SEBS and B. subtilis. Chicken primary intestinal crypt cells were cultured and grouped into control, inorganic Se, B. subtilis, SEBS, and Se-BS treatments to identify the receptor of B. subtilis. Results indicated that B. subtilis and SEBS were recognized by toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), stimulating the NF-κB1 signaling pathway to increase expression of BD-1, which was further enhanced when combined with Se. Pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were up-regulated with B. subtilis supplementation, and inhibited under the action of Se. In conclusion, B. subtilis and SEBS were recognized by the TLR2 receptor in the ileal mucous membrane, which activated the TLR2-MyD88-NF-κB1 signaling pathway to upregulate BD1 expression. In addition, Se enhanced recognition of B. subtilis and reduced levels of pro-inflammatory factors caused by estrogenic B. subtilis supplementation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/d1fo01158hDOI Listing
May 2021

Molecular design and anti-melanoma activity of a novel bullfrog antibacterial peptide RGD-chimera.

Oncol Lett 2021 Feb 15;21(2):115. Epub 2020 Dec 15.

Tianjin Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Breeding and Healthy Husbandry, College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Tianjin Agricultural University, Tianjin 300384, P.R. China.

Melanoma is a common malignant skin tumor, which is the only fatal skin tumor at present. Melanoma has a high degree of malignancy and metastasis. The activity of modified Temporin-La (T-La) peptides from bullfrog skin were evaluated for antitumor activity and improved targeting in melanoma cells. The amino acid sequence of T-La was modified, resulting in the antitumor peptide, T-La (FS). T-La and T-La (FS) were coupled to the RGD small molecule polypeptide to form the chimeric peptides RGD-T-La and RGD-T-La (FS), respectively. The secondary structures for the peptides, evaluated using circular dichroism, were found to be α-helical. The structure of T-La was evaluated using bioinformatics. In addition, the antitumor effects of the modified peptide and the targeting of RGD chimeric peptide to the tumor and were analyzed. Antitumor activity was measured using the MTT assay. Tumor cells with high integrin αvβ3 expression were detected using flow cytometry, and tumor cells were screened for sensitivity to RGD-T-La (FS) to establish a tumor model in nude mice. The effects of the peptides on tumor cells were measured using laser confocal microscopy in real-time. The mechanism of the peptide antitumor activity in tumor cells was evaluated with scanning electron microscopy. B16 melanoma cells were the most sensitive to the peptides, for which the cell survival rate was 24.65% for 10 g/ml RGD-T-La (FS). RGD-La (FS) had a rapid effect on tumor cells. RGD chimeric polypeptides exhibited site-targeting cytotoxic effects in tumor cells. In the B16 melanoma mouse model, the peptides exhibited antitumor effects against early melanoma development and induced tumor apoptosis, possibly by inhibiting VEGF and promoting caspase-3 expression. Overall, the present study provides a scientific basis for the application of small molecule antimicrobial peptides as targeted antitumor agents and lays the foundation for the clinical application of these peptides as antitumor drugs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/ol.2020.12376DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7751474PMC
February 2021

Selenium-enriched Saccharomyces cerevisiae improves the meat quality of broiler chickens via activation of the glutathione and thioredoxin systems.

Poult Sci 2020 Nov 13;99(11):6045-6054. Epub 2020 Aug 13.

Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Breeding and Healthy Breeding of Tianjin, College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Tianjin Agricultural University, Tianjin 300384, China. Electronic address:

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of selenium (Se)-enriched Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SSC) on meat quality and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms in broilers. A total of 200 one-day-old Arbor Acres broiler chickens were randomly allocated to one of four treatments with 5 replications of 10 chickens each. Group 1 served as a control and was fed a basal diet without Se supplementation, while groups 2, 3, and 4 were fed the basal diet supplemented with S. cerevisiae (SC), sodium selenite (SS), and SSC, respectively. Breast muscle samples were collected to evaluate meat quality, selenium concentration, oxidative stability, and the mRNA levels of antioxidant enzyme genes on day 42. As compared with groups 1 and 2, SS and SSC supplementation increased Se concentration, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and thioredoxin reductase (TR) activities, total antioxidant capacity, and the mRNA levels of GPx-1, GPx-4, TR-1, and TR-3 (P < 0.05) and decreased drip loss and malondialdehyde (MDA) content (P < 0.05). As compared with group 3, SSC supplementation increased pH, lightness, yellowness, Se concentration, GPx and superoxide dismutase activities, and the mRNA levels of GPx-1 and GPx-4 (P < 0.05) but decreased drip loss and MDA content (P < 0.05). Thus, SSC improved meat quality and oxidative stability by activating the glutathione and thioredoxin systems, which should be attributed to the combined roles of Se and SC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psj.2020.07.043DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7647820PMC
November 2020

Effects of selenide chitosan sulfate on glutathione system in hepatocytes and specific pathogen-free chickens.

Poult Sci 2020 Aug 26;99(8):3979-3986. Epub 2020 May 26.

College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Tianjin Agricultural University, Tianjin, 300384, China. Electronic address:

This study aimed to investigate the effects of selenide chitosan sulfate (Se-CTS-S) on glutathione (GSH) system in hepatocytes and chickens. Chitosan, sodium selenite (NaSeO), selenide chitosan, chitosan sulfate (CTS-S), and Se-CTS-S were added to the culture medium and the basal diets; glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity, GSH content, total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), and mRNA levels of cellular GPx (GPx-1) and phospholipid hydroperoxide GPx (GPx-4) in vivo and in vitro were determined. The results showed that Se-CTS-S increased (P < 0.05) GPx-1 and GPx-4 mRNA levels in hepatocytes and livers, and GSH-Px activity, GSH content, and T-AOC in the medium, hepatocytes, plasma, and livers compared with the control and chitosan treatments. Compared with CTS-S, Se-CTS-S treatments increased (P < 0.05) GPx-1 and GPx-4 mRNA levels in hepatocytes and livers, and GSH-Px activity, GSH content, and T-AOC capacity in the medium, hepatocytes, and livers. Compared with NaSeO and CTS-Se, Se-CTS-S increased (P < 0.05) GPx-1 mRNA levels in hepatocytes and livers, GPx-4 mRNA levels in hepatocytes and livers, GSH-Px activity in the medium, hepatocytes, and livers, GSH contents in plasma and livers, and T-AOC in the medium, plasma, and livers. Thus, Se-CTS-S showed better biological activity that mainly benefited from the synergistic effects of Se and sulfate on GSH system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psj.2020.04.024DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7597923PMC
August 2020

Effects of Selenium-Enriched Yeast Improved Aflatoxin B1-Induced Changes in Growth Performance, Antioxidation Capacity, IL-2 and IFN-γ Contents, and Gene Expression in Mice.

Biol Trace Elem Res 2019 Sep 15;191(1):183-188. Epub 2018 Dec 15.

College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Tianjin Agricultural University, Tianjin, 300384, China.

Sixty Kunming mice were randomly assigned into three groups. Mice in a control group were fed a basal diet, while mice in AFB1 group and AFB1-Se group were fed the basal diet supplemented with 250 μg/kg AFB1 or the basal diet supplemented with 250 μg/kg AFB1 and 0.2 mg/kg selenium as selenium-enriched yeast, respectively. On day 30 of the experiment, growth performance, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) levels, and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents in liver, interleukin-2 (IL-2), and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) contents in serum, and cytochrome P3a11 (Cyp3a11), IL-2, IFN-γ, and GSH-Px1 mRNA levels in liver were determined. The results showed that final weights, weight gains, T-AOC levels, GSH-Px1, and IFN-γ mRNA levels in AFB1-Se group and control group were higher or significantly higher than those in AFB1 group (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01), respectively. Body length gains in AFB1 group were lower than those in the control group (P < 0.05), while there was no significant difference between the AFB1-Se and control groups (P > 0.05). IL-2 contents and liver IL-2 mRNA levels in AFB1-Se group were significantly higher than those in the AFB1 group and control group (P < 0.01), and IL-2 contents in the control group were also significantly higher than those in the AFB1 group (P < 0.01). IFN-γ contents in AFB1-Se group and AFB1 group were significantly higher than those in control group (P < 0.01), while IFN-γ contents in AFB1-Se group were significantly lower than those in AFB1 group (P < 0.01). Cyp3a11 mRNA levels in AFB1-Se group and AFB1 group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P < 0.01). The results indicated that selenium-enriched yeast could partly reduce the toxicity induced by AFB1 in mice, including improving growth performance, antioxidation capacity, IL-2 and IFN-γ contents, and enhancing IL-2, IFN-γ, and GSH-Px1 mRNA levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12011-018-1607-4DOI Listing
September 2019

Adenovirus-mediated co-expression of the TRAIL and HN genes inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in Marek's disease tumor cell line MSB-1.

Cancer Cell Int 2015 18;15:20. Epub 2015 Feb 18.

College of Animal Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Tianjing Agricultural University, Tianjing, 300384 China.

Background: The objective of this study was to determine the in vitro tumor-inhibitory effect of a recombinant adenovirus expressing a fusion protein of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) genes on the MSB-1 Marek's disease tumor cell line.

Methods: TRAIL and HN genes were amplified from lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of chickens and the LaSota strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV), respectively, using RT-PCR. The two genes were connected with a 2A connecting peptide by site-directed mutagenesis and gene splicing by overlap extension (SOE). The target gene TRAIL-2A-HN was cloned into the shuttle vector pShuttle-CMV. Homologous recombination was carried out with the vector pAdeasy-1 in the bacterium BJ5183 to construct the recombinant adenovirus plasmid pAd-TRAIL-2A-HN. After linearization, the plasmid was transfected into AD293 cells and packaged. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-PCR) and fluorescence microscopy confirmed the introduction of the recombinant adenovirus into AD293 cells. The TCID50 method (50% tissue culture infectious dose) was employed to determine viral titers for the exprimental and control viruses, which met criteria for use. The Marek's disease tumor cell line MSB-1 was transfected with the constructed recombinant adenovirus. The infectivity of the recombinant adenovirus and the expression levels of exogenous genes were detected with RT-PCR and western blotting. The effects of the recombinant adenovirus on the growth of MSB-1 cells and cellular apoptosis were determined using flow cytometry.

Results: The recombinant adenovirus infected the cultured cells in vitro, and replicated and expressed exogenous genes in the cells. The recombinant adenovirus Ad-TRAIL-2A-HN inhibited the growth of MSB-1 cells and induced apoptosis by expressing exogenous genes. The rate of induced MSB-1 cell apoptosis reached 11.61%, which indicated that TRAIL and HN produced synergistic tumor-inhibiting effects.

Conclusion: The constructed TRAIL-2A-HN fusion gene combined the apoptosis-inducing function of TRAIL and the adsorptive capacity of HN from NDV for tumor cells, and the capacity of the recombinant adenovirus expressing this fusion gene to induce tumor cell apoptosis was reported. These results provide a basis for future in vivo tumor suppression studies using recombinant adenoviruses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12935-015-0172-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4345032PMC
March 2015

Effects of selenium-chitosan on blood selenium concentration, antioxidation status, and cellular and humoral immunity in mice.

Biol Trace Elem Res 2015 Jun 31;165(2):145-52. Epub 2015 Jan 31.

College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Tianjin Agricultural University, Tianjin, 300384, China.

One hundred and eighty Kunming mice were allotted to three groups in a randomized complete block design, including two treatments and one control. Mice in group 1 were fed a basal diet as control, while mice in groups 2 and 3 were fed the basal diet supplemented with 0.2 mg/kg selenium as sodium selenite (SS) or selenium-chitosan (SC), respectively. On day 28 of the experiment, blood selenium concentration, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, plasma superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, and Con A-induced splenocyte proliferation were determined, and plasma interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) concentrations, splenic plaque-forming cell (PFC) responses, serum hemolysis level (HC50), and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses were determined on day 15 of the experiment. The results showed that blood selenium concentration, GPx activity, splenic PFC response, and plasma IL-2 and IFN-γ concentrations in SC group were higher than those in the control and SS groups (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05), respectively. Plasma SOD activity, Serum hemolysis level, DTH responses, and Con A-induced splenocyte proliferation in SC group were higher than those in control (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05). Plasma SOD activity, serum hemolysis level, DTH responses, and Con A-induced splenocyte proliferation in SC group were also higher than those in SS group, while there was no significant difference between SC and SS groups (P > 0.05). Plasma MDA content in SC group was lower than those in the control and SS groups (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05). It is concluded that SC supplement can increase blood selenium concentration, antioxidation status, and cellular and humoral immunity, and SC has better biological activity than SS in mice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12011-015-0243-5DOI Listing
June 2015

Effect of selenium-enriched probiotics on laying performance, egg quality, egg selenium content, and egg glutathione peroxidase activity.

J Agric Food Chem 2011 Nov 7;59(21):11424-31. Epub 2011 Oct 7.

Institute of Nutritional and Metabolic Disorders in Domestic Animals and Fowls, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China.

A 35-day experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of selenium-enriched probiotics (SP) on laying performance, egg quality, egg selenium (Se) content, and egg glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity. Five hundred 58-week-old Rohman laying hens were randomly allotted to 5 dietary treatments of 100 each. Each treatment had 5 replicates, and each replicate had 5 cages with 4 hens per cage. The SP was supplemented to a corn-soybean-meal basal diet at 3 different levels that supplied total Se at 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/kg. The basal diet served as a blank control, while the basal diet with supplemental probiotics served as a probiotics control. The results showed that dietary SP supplementation not only increased (p < 0.05) the rate of egg laying, day egg weight, mean egg weight, egg Se content, and egg GPX activity but also decreased (p < 0.05) the feed:egg ratio and egg cholesterol content. The egg Se content was gradually increased (p < 0.05) along with the increasing level of dietary Se. The SP supplementation also slowed down (p < 0.05) the drop of Haugh units (HU) of eggs stored at room temperature. The egg GPX activity had a positive correlation (p < 0.01) with egg Se content and a negative correlation (p < 0.01) with egg HU drop. These results suggested that Se contents, GPX activity, and HU of eggs were affected by the dietary Se level, whereas the egg-laying performance and egg cholesterol content were affected by the dietary probiotics. It was concluded that this SP is an effective feed additive that combines the organic Se benefit for hen and human health with the probiotics benefit for laying hen production performance. It was also suggested that the eggs from hens fed this SP can serve as a nutraceutical food with high Se and low cholesterol contents for both healthy people and patients with hyperlipidemia, fatty liver, or cardiovascular disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf202014kDOI Listing
November 2011

Comparison of glutathione peroxidase 1 and iodothyronine deiodinase 1 mRNA expression in murine liver after feeding selenite or selenized yeast.

J Trace Elem Med Biol 2009 23;23(1):29-35. Epub 2009 Jan 23.

Institute of Nutritional and Metabolic Disorders in Domestic Animals and Fowls, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, Jiangsu Province, China.

The experiment was conducted to compare the effect of different selenium sources on the expression of glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx1) and iodothyronine deiodinase 1 (Dio1) mRNA in mice by quantitative real-time PCR. A total of 60 male Kunming mice at average body weight of 20 g were allotted to three groups in a randomized complete block design, namely two treatments and one control. Mice in Group 1 were fed a basal diet as control, while mice in Groups 2 and 3 were fed the basal diet supplemented with 0.1mg/kg selenium as sodium selenite or selenized yeast, respectively. Whole feeding experiment lasted for 30 d. At the end of the feeding trial, liver mRNA levels of GPx1 and Dio1 were determined by quantitative real-time PCR, as well as growth performance, body composition, blood and GPx activity were determined. The results showed that no significant differences in overall growth performance and body composition, including body weight, body length, heart weight, kidney weight and liver weight, were found between the experimental groups (P>0.05). Blood GPx activity increased in all of the selenium supplemented groups compared with control group (P<0.01). However, blood GPx activity in selenized yeast group was higher than that in sodium selenite group (P<0.05). Liver mRNA levels of GPx1 and Dio1 also increased in the two selenium supplemented groups compared with the control group (P<0.05), while there was no significant difference between the sodium selenite and selenized yeast groups (P>0.05). In conclusion, selenium increased the mRNA expression of GPx1 and Dio1 genes in murine liver, and there was no significant difference between the organic or inorganic form of selenium used.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtemb.2008.11.001DOI Listing
July 2009

Antibacterial action of selenium-enriched probiotics against pathogenic Escherichia coli.

Dig Dis Sci 2009 Feb 10;54(2):246-54. Epub 2008 Jul 10.

Institute of Nutritional and Metabolic Disorders, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China.

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory activity of selenium-enriched probiotics against pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) in vitro and in vivo. Escherichia coli was co-cultured in vitro with each probiotic strain individually, and a mixture of the four strains and its population was counted at various time points. We also collected a cell-free culture supernatant (CFCS) of each probiotic strain and the four-strain mix to examine their antibacterial activity, using the cylinder plate method. Results demonstrated that co-culture with probiotics significantly reduced the number of E. coli. The different sizes of the inhibition zones made by each CFCS proved that E. coli was inhibited by the metabolites of the probiotics. In vivo, Kunming mice were allocated to different groups supplemented with selenium-enriched and other probiotics. After 28 days, the mice were inoculated with pathogenic E. coli so that we could compare mortality rates and inspect other indexes of each treatment. The mortality of the group with selenium-enriched probiotics was the lowest. In addition, the organic antioxidant status improved, immunity was fortified, and the internal environment of the intestinal tract was enhanced with selenium-enriched probiotic supplementation. In conclusion, selenium-enriched probiotics can strongly antagonize pathogenic E. coli in vitro and in vivo.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10620-008-0361-4DOI Listing
February 2009

Comparison of viability and infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts stored in potassium dichromate solution and chlorinated tap water.

Vet Parasitol 2007 Nov 22;150(1-2):13-7. Epub 2007 Oct 22.

College of Veterinary Medicine, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, Jiangsu Province, China.

The present study was undertaken to compare the viability and infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts that had been stored for 1, 4, 7, 10, 13, 16, 20, 25 and 30 months at 4 degrees C in 2.5% potassium dichromate (Cr) or chlorinated tap water, respectively. An excystation protocol was performed in vitro to evaluate viability. One hundred and eighty female BABL/c mice were used to evaluate the infectivity of oocysts by investigating the prepatent period of C. parvum infection, the quantity of oocysts excreted, and the number of parasites that colonized the villi of the ileum. The results showed that C. parvum oocysts preserved in Cr for 1-16 months or in water for 1-13 months were capable of excystation in vitro and infection of mice. The excystation rates of oocysts and the prepatent periods in mice infected by oocysts stored in Cr and water were not significantly different (p>0.05), and there was a strong correlation between prepatent period and duration of oocyst storage (Cr: R2=0.92; water: R2=0.98). There were no significant differences in oocyst shedding from feces or parasitism of the terminal ilea of mice by Cryptosporidia between the two storage media (p>0.05). In conclusion, C. parvum oocysts may be stored at 4 degrees C in water instead of Cr for the purposes of laboratory research. However, the presence of viable C. parvum oocysts in water is a severe challenge to the drinking water treatment industry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2007.09.001DOI Listing
November 2007

Effects of different selenium sources on tissue selenium concentrations, blood GSH-Px activities and plasma interleukin levels in finishing lambs.

Biol Trace Elem Res 2007 Apr;116(1):91-102

College of Veterinary Medicine, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China.

Thirty-two wether lambs of Tan sheep were randomly assigned into four dietary treatment groups (eight per group) for an 8-wk study and then fed a basal diet deficient in Se (0.06 mg/kg) or diets supplemented to provide 0.10 mg/kg Se from sodium selenite, selenized yeast, and seleniumenriched probiotics, respectively. Blood samples were collected at d 0, 28, and 56 of the experiment and tissue samples were collected at experiment termination. Tissue and blood Se concentrations, blood glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, and plasma interleukin levels were analyzed. The results showed that the concentrations of Se in the kidney, liver, and muscle increased in all of the supplemented groups (p < 0.01) compared with the control group. However, the Se concentrations in the kidney, liver, and muscle in the groups supplemented with Se yeast and Se-enriched probiotics were higher than those in the group supplemented with sodium selenite (p < 0.01). The activities of GSH-Px and the concentrations of Se in blood also increased in all of the supplemented groups during the period of supplementation (p < 0.01) compared with the control group. The activities of GSH-Px and the concentrations of Se in the whole blood of the lambs fed with selenized yeast and Se-enriched probiotics were higher than those of lambs fed with sodium selenite (p<0.01 or p<0.05). The concentrations of interleukin-1 and interleukin-2 in plasma significantly increased in all of the supplemented groups during the entire period of experiment (p<0.01) compared with the control group, but had no significant differences among all of the supplemented groups. In conclusion, a diet supplemented with Se for finishing lambs was able to increase the concentrations of Se in tissue and blood, activities of GSH-Px in blood, and levels of interleukins in plasma. Organic Se sources (selenized yeast and Se-enriched probiotics) were more effective than the inorganic Se source (sodium selenite) in increasing tissue and blood Se concentrations and blood GSH-Px activities of lambs. However, there were no significant differences in plasma interleukin levels of lambs between organic and inorganic Se sources.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF02685922DOI Listing
April 2007

Effect of selenium source and level in hen's diet on tissue selenium deposition and egg selenium concentrations.

J Agric Food Chem 2007 Feb;55(3):1027-32

Institute of Nutritional and Metabolic Disorders in Domestic Animals and Fowls, College of Food Science and Technology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China.

The present study was conducted in a 2 x 4 factorial arrangement in a randomized complete block (RCB) design to compare the effects of a commercial inorganic Se source (sodium selenite, SS) with a commercial organic Se source (Se-enriched yeast, SY) on tissue Se distribution and blood and whole-egg Se concentrations in laying hens. Both Se sources were added into the basal diet at 0, 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/kg of Se. Seven hundred 68 week old Rohman laying hens were fed with a basal diet containing 0.15 mg/kg DM (dry matter) of Se for 2 weeks, and then, they were allocated randomly into seven groups and were investigated for 28 days. Each group was replicated five times with five cages of four hens per cage in each replicate. During the experiment, two eggs per replicate from each treatment were collected every 7 days and blood was sampled on days 0, 14, and 28 for whole-egg and whole-blood Se analyses. At the end of the experiment, two hens per replicate from each treatment were slaughtered, and muscle (cardiac and breast muscles), liver, spleen, and kidney were sampled for the determination of Se concentrations. The results showed that the addition of Se from either source caused a significant increase in whole-egg and whole-blood Se concentrations (p < 0.01) and Se concentrations in liver, kidney, spleen, and cardiac and breast muscles (p < 0.05) of hens in comparison to the control. Both Se sources and Se levels significantly influenced (p < 0.01) Se concentrations in egg, blood, and the above-mentioned tissues. There was a more significant increase in the Se concentrations in egg (p < 0.01), spleen (p < 0.05), and breast muscle (p < 0.01) and a decrease (p < 0.01) in whole-blood and kidney from hens fed SY than those from hens fed SS. The order of Se distribution was liver > kidney > spleen > cardiac muscle > egg > blood > breast muscle, irrespective of the addition level or source. It was concluded that meat and eggs from hens fed commercial SY are a potential source of Se for humans.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf062010aDOI Listing
February 2007

[Determination of selenomethionine in selenium-enriched yeast by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

Se Pu 2006 May;24(3):235-8

College of Veterinary Medicine, Nanjing Agricultural University, China.

A method has been developed for the determination of selenomethionine in selenium-enriched yeast by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Three extraction methods were compared for extraction efficiency of selenomethionine from the samples. Selenomethionine in the samples was extracted for 24 h with proteinase in Tris buffer. The selenomethionine was derivatized with butanol and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). The derivatization was accomplished in two steps, starting with the esterification of the carboxyl group of the selenoamino acid using butanol, followed by the acylation of the amino group with trifluoroacetic acid anhydride. The selected ion for monitoring selenomethionine was at m/z 349. The instrument operating conditions were optimized. The samples were analyzed by GC-MS with external standard method. Standard GC-MS chromatograms and mass spectra for selenomethionine were also obtained. The method was proved to be accurate and reliable. The recoveries of 98.5%-103.7% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 0.9%-2.4% (n = 6) and the correlation coefficient of 0.9978 were obtained. The detection limit of selenomethionine for the method was 0.5 mg/L (S/N = 3) and the selenomethionine contents of real sample was given.
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May 2006