Publications by authors named "Shuchi Azuma"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Free flap reconstruction of Achilles tendon and overlying skin defect using ALT and TFL fabricated chimeric flap.

Case Reports Plast Surg Hand Surg 2019 4;6(1):82-85. Epub 2019 Jul 4.

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Iwate Medical University Hospital, Morioka, Japan.

A 33-year-old man developed a left Achilles tendon rupture and skin necrosis. We reconstructed the defect using an anterolateral thigh flap and a tensor fasciae lata muscle flap in a chimeric fashion. he was able to stand on a toe of the operated foot without help 6 months postoperatively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/23320885.2019.1635023DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6609348PMC
July 2019

The Boomerang-shaped Pectoralis Major Musculocutaneous Flap for Reconstruction of Circular Defect of Cervical Skin.

Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open 2017 Nov 20;5(11):e1579. Epub 2017 Nov 20.

Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo Japan.

We report on a patient with a recurrence of oral cancer involving a cervical lymph node. The patient's postexcision cervical skin defect was nearly circular in shape, and the size was about 12 cm in diameter. The defect was successfully reconstructed with a boomerang-shaped pectoralis major musculocutaneous flap whose skin paddle included multiple intercostal perforators of the internal mammary vessels. This flap design is effective for reconstructing an extensive neck skin defect and enables primary closure of the donor site with minimal deformity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GOX.0000000000001579DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5732681PMC
November 2017

Repairing Bronchoesophageal Tube Fistula Using A Contralateral Latissimus Dorsi Musculocutaneous Flap.

Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open 2017 Sep 26;5(9):e1484. Epub 2017 Sep 26.

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba, Japan; and Department of Esophageal Surgery, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba, Japan.

A postoperative aerodigestive fistula is one of the rare but critical complications after esophagectomy, and management is challenging. The essential keys to successful treatment of these fistula are thorough debridement and complete closure followed by separation of the respiratory and digestive tract. We present a case of a recurrent bronchoesophageal fistula between the left main bronchus and neo esophagus, which was successfully treated through a contralateral approach. The fistula was debrided and closed primarily through a right thoracotomy, and the interposition of a pedicled latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap from the right side was carried out. The patient was able to resume oral feeding at 16th postoperative day.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GOX.0000000000001484DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5640357PMC
September 2017

Case of sarcomatoid carcinoma occurring in a patient with Werner syndrome.

J Dermatol 2016 Nov 14;43(11):1362-1364. Epub 2016 Apr 14.

Department of Dermatology, Federation of National Public Service Personnel Mutual Aid Associations, Hamanomachi Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.13399DOI Listing
November 2016

Minimally invasive multiple lymphaticovenular anastomosis at the ankle for the prevention of lower leg lymphedema.

Microsurgery 2014 Jul 12;34(5):372-6. Epub 2013 Nov 12.

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.

Background: The patients with secondary unilateral lower limb lymphedema are likely to experience lymphedema of the contralateral leg in the future. Our policy is to perform preventive lymphaticovenular anastomosis (LVA) of the contralateral limb without symptoms in these patients. In this report, we describe a minimally invasive preventive LVA procedure and present the preliminary results.

Methods: Ten patients with unilateral lower leg lymphedema underwent multiple LVA procedures through a skin incision over the ankle of the contralateral limb without symptoms. The Campisi clinical stage of these limbs without symptoms was stage 0 in five cases and stage 1A in five cases. The number of anastomoses performed through the incision over the ankle was two LVAs in five cases, three LVAs in four cases, and four LVAs in one case.

Results: All the multiple LVAs were completed without complications. The onset of postoperative cellulitis and edematous aggravation of the limb that received the minimally invasive preventive LVA procedure was not noted in any patient during 6-month follow-up period.

Conclusions: This minimally invasive preventive LVA procedure might prevent lymphedema and improve the physical appearance of the limb with minimal scarring. Long-term follow-up will be necessary to monitor the future progression of edema in these patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/micr.22204DOI Listing
July 2014

Near-infrared illumination system-integrated microscope for supermicrosurgical lymphaticovenular anastomosis.

Microsurgery 2014 Jan 9;34(1):23-7. Epub 2013 Jul 9.

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.

Background: Lymphatic supermicrosurgery, lymphaticovenular anastomosis (LVA), is becoming a treatment option for progressive lymphedema with its effectiveness and minimal invasiveness. It is important to detect and anastomose large functional lymphatic vessels for LVA surgery. This study aimed to evaluate usefulness of a near-infrared illumination system-integrated microscope for lymphatic supermicrosurgery.

Methods: We performed LVA on 12 lower extremity lymphedema (LEL) patients with or without intraoperative microscopic indocyanine green (ICG) lymphography guidance. An operating microscope equipped with an integrated near-infrared illumination system (OME-9000; Olympus, Tokyo, Japan) was used for intraoperative microscopic ICG lymphography guidance. Feasibility, anastomosis patency, and treatment effect of the method were evaluated.

Results: Forty LVAs were performed (24 LVAs with intraoperative microscopic ICG lymphography-guidance on 7 limbs, and 16 LVAs without the guidance on 5 limbs). Lymphatic vessels were enhanced by intraoperative microscopic ICG lymphography in 11 of 12 skin incision sites. Time required for detection and dissection of lymphatic vessels in cases with intraoperative microscopic ICG lymphography guidance was significantly shorter than that in cases without the guidance (2.3 ± 1.7 min vs. 6.5 ± 4.0 min, P = 0.010). There was no statistically significant difference in LEL index reduction between cases with and without intraoperative microscopic ICG lymphography guidance (18.3 ± 5.5 vs. 15.0 ± 5.5, P = 0.337).

Conclusions: Intraoperative microscopic ICG lymphography visualized lymphatic vessels, which helps a lymphatic supermicrosurgeon to find and dissect lymphatic vessels earlier.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/micr.22115DOI Listing
January 2014

Handy thermography for bedside evaluation of pressure ulcer.

J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg 2013 Jul 6;66(7):e205-6. Epub 2013 Mar 6.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjps.2013.02.005DOI Listing
July 2013

Donor-site lymphatic function after microvascular lymph node transfer should be followed using indocyanine green lymphography.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2013 Mar;131(3):443e-444e

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0b013e31827c7194DOI Listing
March 2013

Sequential anastomosis for lymphatic supermicrosurgery: multiple lymphaticovenular anastomoses on 1 venule.

Ann Plast Surg 2014 Jul;73(1):46-9

From the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.

Background: Supermicrosurgical lymphaticovenular anastomosis (LVA) is becoming a treatment option for progressive lymphedema. Various types of LVA such as end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, and side-to-side are performed to improve the treatment efficacy.

Methods: We applied sequential anastomosis for LVA surgery, in which 2 lymphatic vessels were anastomosed to 1 venule using side-to-side and side-to-end anastomoses. Six lower extremity lymphedema (LEL) patients who underwent sequential anastomosis were included in this study. Feasibility, anastomosis patency, and treatment effect of the method were evaluated.

Results: Six sequential anastomoses were performed on 6 lymphedematous limbs. All sequential anastomoses showed good anastomosis patency after completion of anastomoses. A significant decrease in LEL index was seen postoperatively (244.0 ± 14.6; postoperative LEL index vs 263.5 ± 19.4; preoperative LEL index, P = 0.002).

Conclusions: Sequential anastomosis can divert both normograde and retrograde lymph flows from 2 lymphatic vessels into 1 venule. Sequential LVA is a useful method to increase lymph flow bypasses, when there are fewer venules than lymphatic vessels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SAP.0b013e31826caff1DOI Listing
July 2014