Publications by authors named "Shrinand V Vaidya"

10 Publications

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India Joining the World of Hip and Knee Registries: Present Status-A Leap Forward.

Indian J Orthop 2021 May 16;55(Suppl 1):46-55. Epub 2020 Sep 16.

HBT Medical College and Dr RN Cooper Hospital, Mumbai, 400056 India.

Background: The number of joint replacements in India is set to grow at the highest rate in the world from 2020 to 2026. It is high time for India to have an efficient and credible registry to help curtail the clinical impact of implant failure at a very early stage by prompt reporting.

Methods: Indian Joint Registry has been established by ISHKS with new data forms for reporting. These new detailed forms record, in addition to previous form, component-wise details of implants. Additional useful features include Linking with unique ID like PAN or Aadhaar, thromboprophylaxis, untoward intra-operative event, IJR consent and type of anaesthesia.

Results: There were 712 registered surgeons in IJR database till June 2020. Total TKRs being reported to registry increased from 1019 in 2006 to 27,000 in 2019. Majority of the patients (98.5%) were diagnosed with osteoarthritis knee. Company-wise distribution unveils that Johnson & Johnson DePuy represents the highest implant usage at over 37%. There has been increased utilisation of uncemented THR over cemented THR from 2006 to 2019. Dual-mobility THRs have gained ground as surgeon preference for the choice of implant.

Conclusion: Effective use of quality registries can lead to better health outcomes at a lower cost for the society. An effective, responsive and sustainable registry in India offers many benefits and should be considered as a key objective. Making the registry function in India successfully will undoubtedly require multi-pronged efforts, but can deliver many benefits both to the patient and to the nation as a whole.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s43465-020-00251-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8149501PMC
May 2021

Does total contact of the patella with the femoral trochlea during no thumb test significantly reduce anterior knee pain?

Knee 2019 Dec 9;26(6):1338-1347. Epub 2019 Aug 9.

Dr. R N Cooper Municipal General Hospital, Mumbai, India.

Background: Complications such as anterior knee pain (AKP) and crepitus continue to be causes of dissatisfaction after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This prospective study aimed to study the significance of total patellar contact with the femoral trochlea of the implant, with the no thumb test during trial reduction, and its effect on reducing AKP.

Methods: Between 2014 and 2016, 445 patellofemoral joints (M:F 126:319, age 45-80 years) and their contact with the trochlea of the femoral component were graded at trial reduction without lateral retinaculum release (Grades I, Ia, II, III based on existing publications). The aim was to restore all patellae to pre-operative thickness. Posterior stabilized implants with a domed patella were used in all cases. The Knee Society Score (KSS) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score were noted at follow up between 12 and 24 months after surgery.

Results: AKP was significantly lower with 100% patellofemoral contact. The KSS and VAS had statistically significant P-values of 0.021 and 0.025 in Grade I and Ia contact, respectively. Better results were achieved where patellar thickness was restored in Grades I and Ia with P-values of 0.041 and 0.046 for VAS change and 0.038 and 0.044 for KSS change, respectively.

Conclusion: At follow up, superior results were obtained where there was a complete patellofemoral contact at trial reduction in Grade I and Grade Ia, and when other confounding factors such as patellar thickness and normal rotation of the femoral and tibial components were standardized. To minimize AKP it is imperative to have total patellar contact with the femoral trochlea.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.knee.2018.09.004DOI Listing
December 2019

What have we learned from 100% success of press fit condylar rotating platform posterior stabilized knees?: A 5-10 years followup by a nondesigner.

Indian J Orthop 2016 Nov-Dec;50(6):647-654

Department of Orthopaedics, King Edward VII Memorial Hospital, Parel, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.

Background: Total joint arthroplasties of the hip and knee represent a remarkable feat of modern medicine in terms of reducing pain and restoring function to millions of patients afflicted with severe arthritis. Oftentimes, the performance and longevity of new implants and devices are based on limited data. This is the first study by a non-designer on the press fit condylar rotating platform posterior stabilized (PFC-RP-PS) design with 100' success. This has a relevance, vis-á -vis bias that one may have in terms of reproducibility of technique and funding from the manufacturer. We associate our excellent mid-term results to intra operative technical aspects and stringent intra operative exclusion criteria.

Materials And Methods: Our study includes a cohort of 121 selected knees operated between January 2003 and October 2010. We used cemented, posterior stabilized (PS), mobile bearing (MB), and RP prosthesis from the same manufacturer in all these 121 knees. The patients were evaluated bi-annually with the calculation of their Knee Society Scores (KSS) and a radiological assessment for loosening/osteolysis.

Results: 120 knees were available for followup. The average Knee Society clinical and functional scores, respectively, were 27 points and 40 points preoperatively and 93 points and 95 points postoperatively. This indicates a mean increase of about 71' in the clinical score and about 58' in the functional score, which is statistically significant. The mean postoperative flexion was 124°, a mean increase of 23° from the preoperative flexion of 101°. There were no revisions (Kaplan--Meier survivorship of 100').

Conclusions: We feel durable and reproducible results of PFC-RP-PS design knees are very technique sensitive. The way ahead with the PFC-RP-PS knees looks promising when the exclusion criteria for this design are strictly met. Coming from a non-designer, this study acquires a higher degree of relevance without any designer's or manufacturer's bias.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0019-5413.193488DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5122261PMC
December 2016

ISHKS joint registry: A preliminary report.

Indian J Orthop 2013 Sep;47(5):505-9

Joints Registry: Indian Society of Hip and Knee Surgeons, Shalby Hospital, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India.

Background: Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) are the most widely practiced surgical options for arthritis all over the world and its application is rising in India. Indian Society of Hip and Knee Surgeons (ISHKS) has established a joints registry and has been collecting data for last 6 years.

Materials & Methods: All members of ISHKS are encouraged to actively participate in the registry. A simple two page knee and hip form can be downloaded from the website www.ishks.com. The information collected includes patient demographics, indication for surgery, implant details and in case of revision arthroplasty: the details of implants removed and the cause of failure of primary arthroplasty. These forms are mailed to the central registry office and the data is fed in computerized registry. Data collection started in October 2006.

Results: Joint registry is a very important initiative of ISHKS and till date, have data of 34,478 TKAs and 3604 THAs, contributed by 42 surgeons across India. Some important observations have emerged. Data of 34,478 TKAs was assessed: These included 8612 males (25%) and 25,866 females (75%). Average age was 64.4 years (Osteoarthritis range: 45 to 88 years; Rheumatoid arthritis range: 22 to 74 years). Average body mass index was 29.1 (Range: 18.1 to 42.9). The indication for TKA was osteoarthritis in 33,444 (97%) and rheumatoid arthritis in 759 (2.2%). Total of 3604 THA procedures were recorded. These included 2162 (60%) male patients and 1442 (40%) female patients. Average age was 52 years (Range 17 to 85 years) and average BMI was 25.8 (Range: 17.3 to 38.5). The indications for THA was AVN in 49%.

Conclusion: The registry will become more meaningful in years to come. Active participation of all arthroplasty surgeons across India is vital for the success of the joints registry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0019-5413.118208DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3796925PMC
September 2013

Effect of total knee arthroplasty on type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension: A prospective study.

Indian J Orthop 2013 Jan;47(1):72-6

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, King Edward VII Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.

Context: Advanced osteoarthritis of knee joint if bilateral, severely restricts patient mobility. This acts as an aggravating factor for pre existing comorbid elements of metabolical syndrome (MS) like Type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension as patients are unable to carry out therapeutic walks. Successfully implanted total knee arthroplasty (TKA) increases physical activity and enables to carry out therapeutic walks thus may help in better control of type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The objective of this prospective study was to find whether TKA for osteoarthritis knee had any effect to improve blood glucose levels and reduce blood pressure.

Materials And Methods: A prospective study was done in which patients operated for tricompartmental osteoarthritis of knee with associated comorbidities like Type II diabetes mellitus or hypertension during a period of 2008 and 2009 were studied. One hundred and twenty patients were enrolled (55 diabetics, 65 hypertensives) who met our inclusion criteria. Preoperative knee society score, lower extremity activity scale fasting blood glucose level and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were compared with one year followup values. The KSS and LEAS scores were analysed by the Wilcoxon signed ranked test, while the fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels and systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels were analysed by paired 't' test.

Results: The reduction of systolic blood pressure by 8 mmHg (t = 5.6, P value < 0.05) and diastolic blood pressure by 6 mmHg (t = 7.6, P value < 0.05) was recorded which was statistically significant. However, no statistically significant effect on fasting blood glucose levels was observed (t = -0.77, P value = 0.442). KSS improved in DM from preoperative 29 to 86 and LEAS improved from 6.7 to 11.3.

Conclusions: Authors are of the opinion that successful total knee replacement results in increased physical activity and reduces blood pressure (systolic and diastolic) in hypertensives. However, the same is not seen in blood glucose level. Increased physical activity and reduced dependence on NSAIDS postoperatively, may be contributing in reduction of systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Further studies in this aspect are necessary.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0019-5413.106913DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3601239PMC
January 2013

Computed tomographic evaluation of femoral component rotation in total knee arthroplasty.

Indian J Orthop 2013 Jan;47(1):40-4

Department of Orthopaedics, King Edward VII Memorial Hospital, Parel, Mumbai, India.

Background: Optimal femoral component rotational alignment in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is crucial to establish a balanced knee reconstruction. Unbalanced knees can lead to instability, patellofemoral problems, persistent pain, stiffness, and generally poorer outcomes including early failure. Intraoperative techniques to achieve this optimal femoral component rotation include the use of the transepicondylar axis (TEA), the posterior-condylar-cut-parallel-to-the-tibial-cut (PCCPTC) technique and the anteroposterior axis technique (Whiteside's line). The purpose of this study was to compare the PCCPTC technique to the TEA technique using computed tomography (CT) scans to assess femoral component rotational alignment.

Materials And Methods: This study used postoperative CT scans to compare the degree of femoral component rotation obtained with the use of PCCPTC technique and the TEA. The femoral component rotation of 30 TKA was measured on postoperative CT scans the angle of deviation between the two lines radiographic trans-epicondylar axis (rTEA) and femoral prosthesis posterior condylar line (FPPCL) was determined. This angle represented the rotation of the femoral component relative to the true rTEA.

Results: The degree of rotation measured 2.67 ± 1.11 degrees in the PCCPTC group and 5.60 ± 1.64 degrees in the TEA group.

Conclusion: The use of the TEA technique for determining rotational alignment in TKR results in excessive external rotation of the femoral component compared to the PCCPTC technique.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0019-5413.106898DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3601232PMC
January 2013

Bilateral multiligament injury of knee caused by entangled dupatta.

Indian J Orthop 2012 Mar;46(2):239-41

Department of Orthopaedics, Multi-storey Building, King Edward VII Memorial Hospital, Parel, Mumbai, India.

We report a rare case of bilateral multiligament knee injury in an 18-year-old female employed in garment industry. Patient was wearing salwar kameez and dupatta while operating an electric laundry machine. In this case we discuss a peculiar mechanism of injury caused due to wearing dupatta near working site and suggest simple preventive measures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0019-5413.93690DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3308669PMC
March 2012

Total knee arthroplasty: Limb length discrepancy and functional outcome.

Indian J Orthop 2010 Jul;44(3):300-7

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, King Edward VII Memorial Hospital and Seth Gordhandas Sundardas Medical College, Mumbai, India.

Background: Limb length discrepancy and its effects on patient function have been discussed in depth in the literature with respect to hip arthroplasty but there are few studies that have examined the effect on function of limb length discrepency following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The aim of this study was to determine whether limb length discrepancy after TKA in patients with bilateral osteoarthritis of knee with varus deformity affects functional outcome.

Materials And Methods: Fifty-four patients with bilateral osteoarthritis of knee with varus deformity, who were operated for total knee arthroplasty from 1996 to 2008, were reviewed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups. Thirty patients (mean age 64 years) were operated for unilateral TKA and thirty patients (mean age 65.8 years) were operated for bilateral total knee arthroplasty. Six patients underwent staged surgery and were included in both groups as the time interval between the two surgeries was more than the minimum 6-month follow-up period specified for inclusion in the study. The limb length discrepancy was measured and statistically correlated with the functional component of the Knee Society Score.

Result: In the unilateral group (n=30), the mean limb length discrepancy was 1.53 cm (range: 0-3 cm) and the mean functional score was 73 (range: 45-100). In the bilateral group (n=30), the mean limb length discrepancy was 0.5 cm (range: 0-2 cm) and the mean functional score was 80.67 (range: 0-100). A statistically significant negative correlation was found between limb length discrepancy and functional score in the unilateral group (Spearman correlation coefficient, r =-0.52, P=0.006), while no statistically significant correlation was found in the bilateral group (Spearman correlation coefficient, r = -0.141, P=0.458).

Conclusion: Limb length discrepancy affects functional outcome after total knee arthroplasty, especially so in patients of bilateral osteoarthritis with varus deformity undergoing surgery of only one knee.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0019-5413.65159DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2911931PMC
July 2010

The use of a dynamic condylar screw and biological reduction techniques for subtrochanteric femur fracture.

Injury 2003 Feb;34(2):123-8

Department of Orthopaedics, MS Building, 6th Floor, King Edward VII Memorial Hospital, Mumbai 400012, Maharashtra, India.

A study was designed to examine the outcomes of patients with closed comminuted subtrochanteric femoral fractures fixed with a dynamic condylar screw (DCS) and using biological (indirect) reduction techniques at a tertiary referral centre.Thirty-one consecutive patients with a mean age of 32.6 years, who sustained subtrochanteric femoral fractures, were treated with this method. Twenty-seven cases (87.2%) sustained these fractures either from traffic crashes or falls from height and the remaining four had a simple fall. Average follow-up was 3 years (range 14-65 months). Patients were assessed clinically and radiographically with regards to fracture classification, operating time, blood loss, time of union, malunion and other complications. Union was achieved in all cases (100%), with full-weight bearing after an average of 4.9 months. The average operating time was 2h and blood loss averaged 430 ml. There was only one case of superficial infection, which settled with local debridement and antibiotics. Malunion was seen in 2 cases out of 31 (6.4%) without the need for further surgery. In conclusion, use of biological (indirect) reduction techniques instead of anatomic, open reduction has proven to be successful, especially in comminuted subtrochanteric fractures. The early appearance of callus avoids the need for primary cancellous bone grafting, emphasising the importance of preserving biology of the fracture fragments.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0020-1383(02)00319-4DOI Listing
February 2003

Multiple joint replacement in chronically neglected polyarthritic patients: Two case reports.

J Orthop Surg (Hong Kong) 2000 Dec;8(2):75-81

Department of Orthopaedics, King Edward VII Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, India.

Multiple joint replacement is a viable option for rehabilitation of young polyarthritic patients with unsalvageable joints. Young polyarthritic patients in this part of the world suffer from chronic neglect because of ignorance, apathy and low socio-economic status. During the period of chronic neglect, these patients acquire extreme deformities of various joints either due to active disease (ankylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis) or irreversible changes in the joint configuration like ankylosis and soft-tissue contracture. Associated spine and thoracic cage affection create problems for anaesthesia and peri-operative positioning. We report 2 cases of multiple joint replacements for young polyarthritic patients who were bedridden for 6 to 11 years. Surgeries were performed in a phased manner and after extensive rehabilitation both patients were able to walk unaided. Various problems and difficulties encountered have been addressed so as to serve as a guide to surgeons who may have to deal with such unusual situations of chronic neglect. We also report a modified exposure technique without trochanteric osteotomy for total hip replacement, which is valuable in extreme external rotation ankylosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/230949900000800214DOI Listing
December 2000
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