Publications by authors named "Shraddha Chavan"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A review on production of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biopolyesters by thermophilic microbes using waste feedstocks.

Bioresour Technol 2021 Sep 8;341:125900. Epub 2021 Sep 8.

INRS Eau, Terre et Environnement, 490, rue de la Couronne, Québec G1K 9A9, Canada.

Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are produced by numerous microbes as a subcellular energy source. Despite of their diverse applications, exorbitant production cost limits their commercial synthesis. Apart from various cost determining factors such as cost-effective feedstocks or economic recovery methods, the use of appropriate bacteria holds the key to reduce the fermentation economics. Extremophiles, especially thermophilic PHA producers, could make the bioprocess economically viable by reducing the production cost in several aspects. Using variety of waste feedstocks as carbon substrates could open the way for the valorisation of industrial waste streams and cost-effective PHA production. Therefore, the article critically reviews the current knowledge of the synthesis of PHA polyesters in thermophilic conditions. Additionally, it summarises several studies on thermophilic PHA producing bacteria grown on various waste substrates. To conclude, the paper focuses on screening and recovery methods as well as technical challenges in thermophilic PHA production.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2021.125900DOI Listing
September 2021

A review on recovery of proteins from industrial wastewaters with special emphasis on PHA production process: Sustainable circular bioeconomy process development.

Bioresour Technol 2020 Dec 12;317:124006. Epub 2020 Aug 12.

INRS Eau, Terre et Environnement, 490, rue de la Couronne, Québec G1K 9A9, Canada.

The economy of the polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production process could be supported by utilising the different by-products released simultaneously during its production. Among these, proteins are present in high concentrations in liquid stream which are released after the cell disruption along with PHA granules. These microbial proteins can be used as animal feed, adhesive material and in manufacturing of bioplastics. The recycling of the protein containing liquid stream also serves as a promising approach to maintain circular bioeconomy in the route. For this aim, it is important to obtain good yield and limit the drawbacks of protein recovery processes and associated costs. The review focuses on recycling of the liquid stream generated during acid/thermal-alkali treatment for PHA production that would close the gap in linear economy and attain circularity in the process. Examples to recover proteins from other industrial waste streams along with their applications have also been discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2020.124006DOI Listing
December 2020

Rhizobium indicum sp. nov., isolated from root nodules of pea (Pisum sativum) cultivated in the Indian trans-Himalayas.

Syst Appl Microbiol 2020 Sep 30;43(5):126127. Epub 2020 Jul 30.

National Centre for Microbial Resource, National Centre for Cell Science, Pune, Maharashtra 411007, India.

Three strains of rhizobia isolated from effective root nodules of pea (Pisum sativum L.) collected from the Indian trans-Himalayas were characterized using 16S rRNA, atpD and recA genes. Phylogeny of the 16S rRNA genes revealed that the newly isolated strains were members of the genus Rhizobium with ≥99.9% sequence similarity to the members within the "Rhizobium leguminosarum" group. Phylogenetic analyses based on the concatenated sequences of atpD and recA gene, and 92 core genes extracted from the genome sequences indicated that strains JKLM 12A2 and JKLM 13E are grouped as a separate clade closely related to R. laguerreae FB206. In contrast, the strain JKLM 19E was placed with "R. hidalgonense" FH14. Whole-genome average nucleotide identity (ANI) values were 97.6% within strains JKLM 12A2 and JKLM 13E, and less than 94% with closely related species. The digital DNA-DNA hybridization (dDDH) values were 81.45 within the two strains and less than 54.8% to closely related species. The major cellular fatty acids were C in summed feature 8, C/C in summed feature 2, and C. The DNA G+C content of JKLM 12A2 and JKLM 13E was 60.8mol%. The data on genomic, chemotaxonomic, and phenotypic characteristics indicates that the strains JKLM 12A2 and JKLM 13E represent a novel species, Rhizobium indicum sp. nov. The type strain is JKLM 12A2 (= MCC 3961=KACC 21380=JCM 33658). However, the strain JKLM 19E represents a member of "R. hidalgonense" and the symbiovar viciae.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.syapm.2020.126127DOI Listing
September 2020

A systematic review of economic evaluations of chemoprophylaxis for tuberculosis.

J Trop Med 2011 1;2011:130976. Epub 2011 Nov 1.

Population Health Section, Institute of Applied Health Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3fx, UK.

Since treatment of active disease remains the priority for tuberculosis control, donors and governments need to be convinced that investing resources in chemoprophylaxis provides health benefits and is good value for money. The limited evidence of cost effectiveness has often been presented in a fragmentary and inconsistent fashion. Objective. This review is aimed at critically reviewing the evidence of cost effectiveness of chemoprophylaxis against tuberculosis, identifying the important knowledge gaps and the current issues which confront policy makers. Methods. A systematic search on economic evaluations for chemoprophylaxis against tuberculosis was carried out, and the selected studies were checked for quality assessment against a standard checklist. Results. The review provides evidence of the cost effectiveness of chemoprophylaxis for all age groups which suggests that current policy should be amended to include a focus on older adults. Seven of the eight selected studies were undertaken wholly in high income countries but there are considerable doubts about the transferability of the findings of the selected studies to low and middle income countries which have the greatest incidence of latent tuberculosis infection. Conclusion. There is a pressing need to expand the evidence base to low and middle income countries where the vast majority of sufferers from tuberculosis live.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/130976DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3206325PMC
August 2012
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