Publications by authors named "Shlomi Toussia-Cohen"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Pregnancy and neonatal outcomes of twin pregnancies - the role of maternal age.

J Perinat Med 2021 Feb 17. Epub 2021 Feb 17.

The Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Ramat-Gan, Israel.

Objectives: We aim to study the association of maternal age with maternal and neonatal complications in twin pregnancies.

Methods: A retrospective cohort study of dichorionic-diamniotic twin pregnancies stratified into three groups according to maternal age ("A" <25, "B" 25-34 and "C" 35-44 years old). Outcome measures included pregnancy, delivery and neonatal complications. A sub-analysis of fertilization pregnancies only was conducted.

Results: Compared with younger women (groups A [n=65] and B [n=783]), older women [group C (n=392)] demonstrated significantly higher rates of gestational diabetes mellitus (B 6.6% vs. A 0%, p =0.027, C 10.2% vs. B 6.6%, p =0.032), were more likely to undergo cesarean deliveries (C 66.6%, B 57.6%, A 52.3%, p =0.007), and were at increased risk of having more than 20% difference in weight between the twins (C 24.5%, B 17.4%, A 16.9%, p =0.013). Other outcomes, including preeclampsia, did not differ between the groups. A sub-analysis of the fertilization only pregnancies was performed. Compared with younger women (groups A [n=18] and B [n=388]), older women (group C [n=230]) underwent more cesarean deliveries (p=0.004), and had more than 20% difference in weight between the twins (p<0.004). Other outcomes, including gestational diabetes mellitus rates and preeclampsia, did not differ between the groups.

Conclusions: Women at advanced maternal age with dichorionic twin pregnancies had significantly higher rates of gestational diabetes mellitus, cesarean deliveries and fetal weight discordancy as compared with younger women. In contrast, the incidence of preeclampsia was not affected by maternal age.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/jpm-2020-0386DOI Listing
February 2021

Long-term follow-up on fetuses with isolated sonographic finding of short long bones: a cohort study.

Arch Gynecol Obstet 2020 02 24;301(2):459-463. Epub 2019 Dec 24.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, 52621, Ramat Gan, Israel.

Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome of fetuses with a diagnosis of isolated short long bones.

Methods: A retrospective review was conducted of all cases diagnosed with short long bones above 20 weeks of gestation during 2010-2017 in a single tertiary center. Exclusion criteria included abnormal sonographic findings other than short long bones, suspected genetic syndromes, chromosomal abnormalities, and abnormal Doppler flow indices. Follow-up was carried out by telephone questionnaire.

Results: During the study period, 54 (24.32%) women met inclusion criteria. Mean gestational age at delivery was 38.05 years (± 2.42 SD). Mean birth weight was 12-19th percentile according to the local fetal growth charts [2645 g (± 684 SD) 95% CI 2173-2980]. Median time for post-natal follow-up was 9.3 years (IQR 6.6-10.75). Growth below the 10th percentile was demonstrated in 27 (50%) children. 11 (20.37%) children were followed up by endocrinological clinics, of them 7 (12.96%) were treated with growth hormone. Three (5.6%) of the children were diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, an incidence that is considered lower than that of the general population (± 9%).

Conclusions: Prenatal fetal isolated short long bones diagnosed during the late second and third trimester is associated with short stature. No neurodevelopmental impact was observed in our study group.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00404-019-05421-4DOI Listing
February 2020

Immediate and delayed hyperbaric oxygen therapy as a neuroprotective treatment for traumatic brain injury in mice.

Mol Cell Neurosci 2017 09 8;83:74-82. Epub 2017 Jul 8.

Department of Anatomy and Anthropology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978, Israel; Sagol School of Neuroscience, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978, Israel; The Dr. Miriam and Sheldon G. Adelson Chair, Center for the Biology of Addictive Diseases, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978, Israel.

Background: Traumatic brain injury is the most common cause of death or chronic disability among people under-35-years-old. There is no effective pharmacological treatment currently existing for TBI. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is defined as the inhalation of pure oxygen in a hyperbaric chamber that is pressurized higher than 1atm. HBOT offers physiological and mechanical effects by inducing a state of increased pressure and hyperoxia. HBOT has been proposed as an effective treatment for moderate traumatic brain injury (mTBI), yet the exact therapeutic window and mechanism that underlies this effect is not completely understood.

Methods: HBOT was administrated for 4 consecutive days, post a mouse closed head weight drop moderate TBI (mTBI) in 2 different time lines: immediate treatment - initiated 3h post-injury and delayed treatment - initiated 7days post-injury. Behavioral cognitive tests and biochemical changes were assessed.

Results: The results were similar for both the immediate and the delayed treatments. mTBI mice exhibited impairment in learning abilities, whereas mTBI mice treated with HBO displayed significant improvement compared with the mTBI group, performing similar to the sham groups. mTBI mice had a decline in myelin basic protein, an increase in neuronal loss (NeuN staining), and an increase in the number of reactive astrocytes (GFAP). The HBO treated mice in both groups did not exhibit these changes and remained similar to the sham group.

Conclusions: The delayed HBOT has a potential to serve as a neuroprotective treatment for mTBI with a long therapeutic window. Further research is needed for fully understanding the cellular changes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mcn.2017.06.004DOI Listing
September 2017