Publications by authors named "Shirin Omidi"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Association of Peri-ictal Brainstem Posturing With Seizure Severity and Breathing Compromise in Patients With Generalized Convulsive Seizures.

Neurology 2021 01 2;96(3):e352-e365. Epub 2020 Dec 2.

From the NINDS Center for SUDEP Research (L.V., N.L., S.O., M.O.-U., S.T., M.R.S.R., R.K.S., D.F., M.N., C.S., L.A., B.K.G., J.S.H., S.S., J.O., R.M.H., B.D., L.M.B., O.D., G.B.R., P.R., G.-Q.Z., S.D.L.) and Department of Neurology (L.V., N.L., J.P.H., S.O., M.O.-U., S.T., M.R.S.R., N.J.H., J.S.H., G.-Q.Z., S.D.L.), McGovern Medical School, and Biostatistics and Epidemiology Research Design Core (L.Z., G.B.R.), Division of Clinical and Translational Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston; Departament de Medicina (L.V.), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain; University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine (R.K.S., B.K.G.), Iowa City; NYU Langone School of Medicine (D.F., O.D.), New York; Sidney Kimmel Medical College (M.N.), Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA; Division of Pulmonary (K.S.), Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University Hospitals Medical Center, Cleveland, OH; Institute of Neurology (C.S., L.A., B.D.), University College London, UK; Case Western Reserve University (N.S., X.Z., V.R.-M.), Cleveland, OH; Feinberg School of Medicine (S.S.), Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; Department of Neurobiology and the Brain Research Institute (J.O., R.M.H.), University of California, Los Angeles; Department of Neurology (L.M.B.), Columbia University, New York, NY; and Department of Clinical Neuroscience (P.R.), Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Objective: To analyze the association between peri-ictal brainstem posturing semiologies with postictal generalized electroencephalographic suppression (PGES) and breathing dysfunction in generalized convulsive seizures (GCS).

Methods: In this prospective, multicenter analysis of GCS, ictal brainstem semiology was classified as (1) decerebration (bilateral symmetric tonic arm extension), (2) decortication (bilateral symmetric tonic arm flexion only), (3) hemi-decerebration (unilateral tonic arm extension with contralateral flexion) and (4) absence of ictal tonic phase. Postictal posturing was also assessed. Respiration was monitored with thoracoabdominal belts, video, and pulse oximetry.

Results: Two hundred ninety-five seizures (180 patients) were analyzed. Ictal decerebration was observed in 122 of 295 (41.4%), decortication in 47 of 295 (15.9%), and hemi-decerebration in 28 of 295 (9.5%) seizures. Tonic phase was absent in 98 of 295 (33.2%) seizures. Postictal posturing occurred in 18 of 295 (6.1%) seizures. PGES risk increased with ictal decerebration (odds ratio [OR] 14.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 6.18-35.39, < 0.001), decortication (OR 11.26, 95% CI 2.96-42.93, < 0.001), or hemi-decerebration (OR 48.56, 95% CI 6.07-388.78, < 0.001). Ictal decerebration was associated with longer PGES ( = 0.011). Postictal posturing was associated with postconvulsive central apnea (PCCA) ( = 0.004), longer hypoxemia ( < 0.001), and Spo recovery ( = 0.035).

Conclusions: Ictal brainstem semiology is associated with increased PGES risk. Ictal decerebration is associated with longer PGES. Postictal posturing is associated with a 6-fold increased risk of PCCA, longer hypoxemia, and Spo recovery. Peri-ictal brainstem posturing may be a surrogate biomarker for GCS severity identifiable without in-hospital monitoring.

Classification Of Evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that peri-ictal brainstem posturing is associated with the GCS with more prolonged PGES and more severe breathing dysfunction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000011274DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7884980PMC
January 2021

Could the 2017 ILAE and the four-dimensional epilepsy classifications be merged to a new "Integrated Epilepsy Classification"?

Seizure 2020 May 5;78:31-37. Epub 2020 Mar 5.

Department of Neurology, Beaumont Hospital, and FutureNeuro Research Centre, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.

Over the last few decades the ILAE classifications for seizures and epilepsies (ILAE-EC) have been updated repeatedly to reflect the substantial progress that has been made in diagnosis and understanding of the etiology of epilepsies and seizures and to correct some of the shortcomings of the terminology used by the original taxonomy from the 1980s. However, these proposals have not been universally accepted or used in routine clinical practice. During the same period, a separate classification known as the "Four-dimensional epilepsy classification" (4D-EC) was developed which includes a seizure classification based exclusively on ictal symptomatology, which has been tested and adapted over the years. The extensive arguments for and against these two classification systems made in the past have mainly focused on the shortcomings of each system, presuming that they are incompatible. As a further more detailed discussion of the differences seemed relatively unproductive, we here review and assess the concordance between these two approaches that has evolved over time, to consider whether a classification incorporating the best aspects of the two approaches is feasible. To facilitate further discussion in this direction we outline a concrete proposal showing how such a compromise could be accomplished, the "Integrated Epilepsy Classification". This consists of five categories derived to different degrees from both of the classification systems: 1) a "Headline" summarizing localization and etiology for the less specialized users, 2) "Seizure type(s)", 3) "Epilepsy type" (focal, generalized or unknown allowing to add the epilepsy syndrome if available), 4) "Etiology", and 5) "Comorbidities & patient preferences".
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2020.02.018DOI Listing
May 2020

Cardiac arrest associated with epileptic seizures: A case report with simultaneous EEG and ECG.

Epilepsy Behav Case Rep 2014 29;2:145-51. Epub 2014 Aug 29.

Shefa Neuroscience Research Center, Khatamolanbia Hospital, Tehran, Iran ; Pars Advanced Medical Research Center, Pars Hospital, Tehran, Iran.

Ictal asystole is a rare, probably underestimated manifestation of epileptic seizures whose pathophysiology is still debated. This report describes two patients who had cardiac asystole at the end of their seizure. The first patient was a 13-year-old boy with complex partial seizures.. His MRI showed symmetrical signal abnormality in the bilateral parietooccipital lobe accompanied by mild gliosis and volume loss. During a 3-day long-term video-EEG monitoring, he had cardiac arrest at the end of one of his seizures that was secondarily generalized. The second one was a 42-year-old veteran with penetrating head trauma in the left frontal lobe due to shell injury. During long-term video-EEG monitoring, he had one generalized tonic-clonic seizure accompanied by bradycardia and cardiac asystole. Asystoles could have a role in the incidence of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), meaning that the presence of ictal bradycardia is a risk factor for SUDEP. In cases of epileptic cardiac dysrhythmia, prolonged simultaneous EEG/ECG monitoring may be required. Cardiological investigation should be included in epilepsy management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ebcr.2014.07.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4307967PMC
February 2015

Giant Virchow-Robin spaces as an incidental finding in a patient with parkinsonism.

Arch Iran Med 2014 Aug;17(8):587-8

Neurology Department, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Virchow-Robin spaces are perivascular spaces that surround small arteries and arterioles as they enter the brain parenchyma. They are usually normal findings on MRI of healthy people. Rarely, Virchow-Robin spaces look strikingly enlarged, causing mass effect and unusual cystic conformations that may be misinterpreted as other pathologic processes, such as a cystic neoplasm. Here, we describe a 52-year-old woman in whom brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), performed to evaluate Parkinsonism, incidentally found giant Virchow-Robins space or Swiss cheese brain syndrome. In our patient, it seems that the giant Virchow-Robin spaces have been found incidentally and are not associated with the patient's Parkinsonism symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/014178/AIM.0012DOI Listing
August 2014

Iranian neurological events: The 1(st) Iranian congress of neurointervention.

Iran J Neurol 2013 ;12(4):176-9

Resident, Department of Neurology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3829304PMC
November 2013