Publications by authors named "Shire Beach"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Use of Ballistocardiography to Monitor Cardiovascular Hemodynamics in Preeclampsia.

Womens Health Rep (New Rochelle) 2021 20;2(1):97-105. Epub 2021 Apr 20.

Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA.

Pregnancy requires a complex physiological adaptation of the maternal cardiovascular system, which is disrupted in women with pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia, putting them at higher risk of future cardiovascular events. The measurement of body movements in response to cardiac ejection ballistocardiogram (BCG) can be used to assess cardiovascular hemodynamics noninvasively in women with preeclampsia. Using a previously validated, modified weighing scale for assessment of cardiovascular hemodynamics through measurement of BCG and electrocardiogram (ECG) signals, we collected serial measurements throughout pregnancy and postpartum and analyzed data in 30 women with preeclampsia and 23 normotensive controls. Using BCG and ECG signals, we extracted measures of cardiac output, J-wave amplitude × heart rate (J-amp × HR). Mixed-effect models with repeated measures were used to compare J-amp × HRs between groups at different time points in pregnancy and postpartum. In normotensive controls, the J-amp × HR was significantly lower early postpartum (E-PP) compared with the second trimester (T2;  = 0.016) and third trimester (T3;  = 0.001). Women with preeclampsia had a significantly lower J-amp × HR compared with normotensive controls during the first trimester (T1;  = 0.026). In the preeclampsia group, there was a trend toward an increase in J-amp × HR from T1 to T2 and then a drop in J-amp × HR at T3 and further drop at E-PP. We observe cardiac hemodynamic changes consistent with those reported using well-validated tools. In pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia, the maximal force of contraction is lower, suggesting lower cardiac output and a trend in hemodynamics consistent with the hyperdynamic disease model of preeclampsia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/whr.2020.0127DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8080913PMC
April 2021

Women in Cardiology Twitter Network: An Analysis of a Global Professional Virtual Community From 2016 to 2019.

J Am Heart Assoc 2021 Feb 23;10(5):e019321. Epub 2021 Feb 23.

Division of Cardiology Department of Medicine University of California Los Angeles CA.

Background Social media is an effective channel for the advancement of women physicians; however, its use by women in cardiology has not been systematically studied. Our study seeks to characterize the current Women in Cardiology Twitter network. Methods and Results Six women-specific cardiology Twitter hashtags were analyzed: #ACCWIC (American College of Cardiology Women in Cardiology), #AHAWIC (American Heart Association Women in Cardiology), #ilooklikeacardiologist, #SCAIWIN (Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions Women in Innovations), #WomeninCardiology, and #WomeninEP (Women in Electrophysiology). Twitter data from 2016 to 2019 were obtained from Symplur Signals. Quantitative and descriptive content analyses were performed. The Women in Cardiology Twitter network generated 48 236 tweets, 266 180 903 impressions, and 12 485 users. Tweets increased by 706% (from 2083 to 16 780), impressions by 207% (from 26 755 476 to 82 080 472), and users by 440% (from 796 to 4300), including a 471% user increase internationally. The network generated 6530 (13%) original tweets and 43 103 (86%) amplification tweets. Most original and amplification tweets were authored by women (81% and 62%, respectively) and women physicians (76% and 52%, respectively), with an increase in original and amplification tweets authored by academic women physicians (98% and 109%, respectively) and trainees (390% and 249%, respectively) over time. Community building, professional development, and gender advocacy were the most common tweet contents over the study period. Community building was the most common tweet category for #ACCWIC, #AHAWIC, #ilooklikeacardiologist, #SCAIWIN, and #WomeninCardiology, whereas professional development was most common for #WomeninEP. Conclusions The Women in Cardiology Twitter network has grown immensely from 2016 to 2019, with women physicians as the driving contributors. This network has become an important channel for community building, professional development, and gender advocacy discussions in an effort to advance women in cardiology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.120.019321DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8174265PMC
February 2021

Fifty-second flat-line: A dramatic case of ictal asystole.

HeartRhythm Case Rep 2020 Oct 18;6(10):794-797. Epub 2020 Aug 18.

UCLA Cardio-Oncology Program, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hrcr.2020.08.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7573472PMC
October 2020

Of Heroes and Cowards.

Authors:
Shire Lynn Beach

N Engl J Med 2020 Aug 3;383(6):e36. Epub 2020 Jun 3.

From the Department of Internal Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMp2013266DOI Listing
August 2020

Characterising ICU-ward handoffs at three academic medical centres: process and perceptions.

BMJ Qual Saf 2019 08 12;28(8):627-634. Epub 2019 Jan 12.

Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Background: There is limited literature about physician handoffs between the intensive care unit (ICU) and the ward, and best practices have not been described. These patients are uniquely vulnerable given their medical complexity, diagnostic uncertainty and reduced monitoring intensity. We aimed to characterise the structure, perceptions and processes of ICU-ward handoffs across three teaching hospitals using multimodal methods: by identifying the handoff components involved in communication failures and describing common processes of patient transfer.

Methods: We conducted a study at three academic medical centres using two methods to characterise the structure, perceptions and processes of ICU-ward transfers: (1) an anonymous resident survey characterising handoff communication during ICU-ward transfer, and (2) comparison of process maps to identify similarities and differences between ICU-ward transfer processes across the three hospitals.

Results: Of the 295 internal medicine residents approached, 175 (59%) completed the survey. 87% of the respondents recalled at least one adverse event related to communication failure during ICU-ward transfer. 95% agreed that a well-structured handoff template would improve ICU-ward transfer. Rehabilitation needs, intravenous access/hardware and risk assessments for readmission to the ICU were the most frequently omitted or incorrectly communicated components of handoff notes. More than 60% of the respondents reported that notes omitted or miscommunicated pending results, active subspecialty consultants, nutrition and intravenous fluids, antibiotics, and healthcare decision-maker information at least twice per month. Despite variable process across the three sites, all process maps demonstrated flaws and potential for harm in critical steps of the ICU-ward transition.

Conclusion: In this multisite study, despite significant process variation across sites, almost all resident physicians recalled an adverse event related to the ICU-ward handoff. Future work is needed to determine best practices for ICU-ward handoffs at academic medical centres.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjqs-2018-008328DOI Listing
August 2019