Publications by authors named "Shira Barzilay"

27 Publications

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Excessive and pathological Internet use - Risk-behavior or psychopathology?

Addict Behav 2021 12 9;123:107045. Epub 2021 Jul 9.

National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention of Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Pathological Internet use (but only with respect to gaming) is classified as mental disorder in the ICD-11. However, there is a large group of adolescents showing excessive Internet use, which may rather be considered adolescent risk-behavior. The aim was to test whether pathological and excessive Internet use should be considered as "psychopathology" or "risk-behavior". A representative, cross-sectional sample of 11.110 students from 10 European Union countries was analyzed. Structural equation models, including the factors "risk-behavior" and "psychopathology" and the variables excessive and pathological Internet use, were tested against each other. "Risk-behavior" was operationalized by several risk-behaviors (e.g. drug abuse, truancy, etc). "Psychopathology" included measures of several mental disorders (e.g. depression, hyperactivity, etc). Excessive Internet use was assessed as the duration and frequency of Internet use. Pathological Internet use was assessed with the Young Diagnostic Questionnaire (i.e., presence of addiction criteria). Excessive Internet use loaded on "risk-behavior" (λ = 0.484, p < .001) and on "psychopathology" (λ = 0.071, p < .007). Pathological Internet use loaded on "risk-behavior" (λ = 0.333, p < .001) and on "psychopathology" (λ = 0.852, p < .001). Chi-square tests determined that the loadings of excessive Internet use (χ (1) = 81.98, p < .001) were significantly stronger on "risk-behavior" than "psychopathology". Vice versa, pathological Internet use loaded significantly stronger on "psychopathology" (χ (1) = 107.10, p < .001). The results indicate that pathological Internet use should rather be considered as psychopathology. Excessive Internet use on the other hand, should be classified as adolescent risk-behavior.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2021.107045DOI Listing
December 2021

Excessive and pathological Internet use - Risk-behavior or psychopathology?

Addict Behav 2021 12 9;123:107045. Epub 2021 Jul 9.

National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention of Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Pathological Internet use (but only with respect to gaming) is classified as mental disorder in the ICD-11. However, there is a large group of adolescents showing excessive Internet use, which may rather be considered adolescent risk-behavior. The aim was to test whether pathological and excessive Internet use should be considered as "psychopathology" or "risk-behavior". A representative, cross-sectional sample of 11.110 students from 10 European Union countries was analyzed. Structural equation models, including the factors "risk-behavior" and "psychopathology" and the variables excessive and pathological Internet use, were tested against each other. "Risk-behavior" was operationalized by several risk-behaviors (e.g. drug abuse, truancy, etc). "Psychopathology" included measures of several mental disorders (e.g. depression, hyperactivity, etc). Excessive Internet use was assessed as the duration and frequency of Internet use. Pathological Internet use was assessed with the Young Diagnostic Questionnaire (i.e., presence of addiction criteria). Excessive Internet use loaded on "risk-behavior" (λ = 0.484, p < .001) and on "psychopathology" (λ = 0.071, p < .007). Pathological Internet use loaded on "risk-behavior" (λ = 0.333, p < .001) and on "psychopathology" (λ = 0.852, p < .001). Chi-square tests determined that the loadings of excessive Internet use (χ (1) = 81.98, p < .001) were significantly stronger on "risk-behavior" than "psychopathology". Vice versa, pathological Internet use loaded significantly stronger on "psychopathology" (χ (1) = 107.10, p < .001). The results indicate that pathological Internet use should rather be considered as psychopathology. Excessive Internet use on the other hand, should be classified as adolescent risk-behavior.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2021.107045DOI Listing
December 2021

Excessive and pathological Internet use - Risk-behavior or psychopathology?

Addict Behav 2021 12 9;123:107045. Epub 2021 Jul 9.

National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention of Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Pathological Internet use (but only with respect to gaming) is classified as mental disorder in the ICD-11. However, there is a large group of adolescents showing excessive Internet use, which may rather be considered adolescent risk-behavior. The aim was to test whether pathological and excessive Internet use should be considered as "psychopathology" or "risk-behavior". A representative, cross-sectional sample of 11.110 students from 10 European Union countries was analyzed. Structural equation models, including the factors "risk-behavior" and "psychopathology" and the variables excessive and pathological Internet use, were tested against each other. "Risk-behavior" was operationalized by several risk-behaviors (e.g. drug abuse, truancy, etc). "Psychopathology" included measures of several mental disorders (e.g. depression, hyperactivity, etc). Excessive Internet use was assessed as the duration and frequency of Internet use. Pathological Internet use was assessed with the Young Diagnostic Questionnaire (i.e., presence of addiction criteria). Excessive Internet use loaded on "risk-behavior" (λ = 0.484, p < .001) and on "psychopathology" (λ = 0.071, p < .007). Pathological Internet use loaded on "risk-behavior" (λ = 0.333, p < .001) and on "psychopathology" (λ = 0.852, p < .001). Chi-square tests determined that the loadings of excessive Internet use (χ (1) = 81.98, p < .001) were significantly stronger on "risk-behavior" than "psychopathology". Vice versa, pathological Internet use loaded significantly stronger on "psychopathology" (χ (1) = 107.10, p < .001). The results indicate that pathological Internet use should rather be considered as psychopathology. Excessive Internet use on the other hand, should be classified as adolescent risk-behavior.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2021.107045DOI Listing
December 2021

Excessive and pathological Internet use - Risk-behavior or psychopathology?

Addict Behav 2021 12 9;123:107045. Epub 2021 Jul 9.

National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention of Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Pathological Internet use (but only with respect to gaming) is classified as mental disorder in the ICD-11. However, there is a large group of adolescents showing excessive Internet use, which may rather be considered adolescent risk-behavior. The aim was to test whether pathological and excessive Internet use should be considered as "psychopathology" or "risk-behavior". A representative, cross-sectional sample of 11.110 students from 10 European Union countries was analyzed. Structural equation models, including the factors "risk-behavior" and "psychopathology" and the variables excessive and pathological Internet use, were tested against each other. "Risk-behavior" was operationalized by several risk-behaviors (e.g. drug abuse, truancy, etc). "Psychopathology" included measures of several mental disorders (e.g. depression, hyperactivity, etc). Excessive Internet use was assessed as the duration and frequency of Internet use. Pathological Internet use was assessed with the Young Diagnostic Questionnaire (i.e., presence of addiction criteria). Excessive Internet use loaded on "risk-behavior" (λ = 0.484, p < .001) and on "psychopathology" (λ = 0.071, p < .007). Pathological Internet use loaded on "risk-behavior" (λ = 0.333, p < .001) and on "psychopathology" (λ = 0.852, p < .001). Chi-square tests determined that the loadings of excessive Internet use (χ (1) = 81.98, p < .001) were significantly stronger on "risk-behavior" than "psychopathology". Vice versa, pathological Internet use loaded significantly stronger on "psychopathology" (χ (1) = 107.10, p < .001). The results indicate that pathological Internet use should rather be considered as psychopathology. Excessive Internet use on the other hand, should be classified as adolescent risk-behavior.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2021.107045DOI Listing
December 2021

Excessive and pathological Internet use - Risk-behavior or psychopathology?

Addict Behav 2021 12 9;123:107045. Epub 2021 Jul 9.

National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention of Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Pathological Internet use (but only with respect to gaming) is classified as mental disorder in the ICD-11. However, there is a large group of adolescents showing excessive Internet use, which may rather be considered adolescent risk-behavior. The aim was to test whether pathological and excessive Internet use should be considered as "psychopathology" or "risk-behavior". A representative, cross-sectional sample of 11.110 students from 10 European Union countries was analyzed. Structural equation models, including the factors "risk-behavior" and "psychopathology" and the variables excessive and pathological Internet use, were tested against each other. "Risk-behavior" was operationalized by several risk-behaviors (e.g. drug abuse, truancy, etc). "Psychopathology" included measures of several mental disorders (e.g. depression, hyperactivity, etc). Excessive Internet use was assessed as the duration and frequency of Internet use. Pathological Internet use was assessed with the Young Diagnostic Questionnaire (i.e., presence of addiction criteria). Excessive Internet use loaded on "risk-behavior" (λ = 0.484, p < .001) and on "psychopathology" (λ = 0.071, p < .007). Pathological Internet use loaded on "risk-behavior" (λ = 0.333, p < .001) and on "psychopathology" (λ = 0.852, p < .001). Chi-square tests determined that the loadings of excessive Internet use (χ (1) = 81.98, p < .001) were significantly stronger on "risk-behavior" than "psychopathology". Vice versa, pathological Internet use loaded significantly stronger on "psychopathology" (χ (1) = 107.10, p < .001). The results indicate that pathological Internet use should rather be considered as psychopathology. Excessive Internet use on the other hand, should be classified as adolescent risk-behavior.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2021.107045DOI Listing
December 2021

Perspectives on cross-diagnostic trajectories and outcomes in children's mental health.

Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2020 08;29(8):1031-1033

Fienberg Child Study Center, Schneider Children' Medical Center of Israel, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-020-01584-7DOI Listing
August 2020

Perspectives on cross-diagnostic trajectories and outcomes in children's mental health.

Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2020 08;29(8):1031-1033

Fienberg Child Study Center, Schneider Children' Medical Center of Israel, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-020-01584-7DOI Listing
August 2020

Perspectives on cross-diagnostic trajectories and outcomes in children's mental health.

Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2020 08;29(8):1031-1033

Fienberg Child Study Center, Schneider Children' Medical Center of Israel, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-020-01584-7DOI Listing
August 2020

Perspectives on cross-diagnostic trajectories and outcomes in children's mental health.

Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2020 08;29(8):1031-1033

Fienberg Child Study Center, Schneider Children' Medical Center of Israel, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-020-01584-7DOI Listing
August 2020

Perspectives on cross-diagnostic trajectories and outcomes in children's mental health.

Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2020 08;29(8):1031-1033

Fienberg Child Study Center, Schneider Children' Medical Center of Israel, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-020-01584-7DOI Listing
August 2020

Perspectives on cross-diagnostic trajectories and outcomes in children's mental health.

Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2020 08;29(8):1031-1033

Fienberg Child Study Center, Schneider Children' Medical Center of Israel, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-020-01584-7DOI Listing
August 2020

Perspectives on cross-diagnostic trajectories and outcomes in children's mental health.

Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2020 08;29(8):1031-1033

Fienberg Child Study Center, Schneider Children' Medical Center of Israel, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-020-01584-7DOI Listing
August 2020

Perspectives on cross-diagnostic trajectories and outcomes in children's mental health.

Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2020 08;29(8):1031-1033

Fienberg Child Study Center, Schneider Children' Medical Center of Israel, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-020-01584-7DOI Listing
August 2020

Perspectives on cross-diagnostic trajectories and outcomes in children's mental health.

Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2020 08;29(8):1031-1033

Fienberg Child Study Center, Schneider Children' Medical Center of Israel, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-020-01584-7DOI Listing
August 2020

Perspectives on cross-diagnostic trajectories and outcomes in children's mental health.

Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2020 08;29(8):1031-1033

Fienberg Child Study Center, Schneider Children' Medical Center of Israel, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-020-01584-7DOI Listing
August 2020

Perspectives on cross-diagnostic trajectories and outcomes in children's mental health.

Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2020 08;29(8):1031-1033

Fienberg Child Study Center, Schneider Children' Medical Center of Israel, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-020-01584-7DOI Listing
August 2020

Perspectives on cross-diagnostic trajectories and outcomes in children's mental health.

Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2020 08;29(8):1031-1033

Fienberg Child Study Center, Schneider Children' Medical Center of Israel, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-020-01584-7DOI Listing
August 2020

Perspectives on cross-diagnostic trajectories and outcomes in children's mental health.

Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2020 08;29(8):1031-1033

Fienberg Child Study Center, Schneider Children' Medical Center of Israel, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-020-01584-7DOI Listing
August 2020

Perspectives on cross-diagnostic trajectories and outcomes in children's mental health.

Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2020 08;29(8):1031-1033

Fienberg Child Study Center, Schneider Children' Medical Center of Israel, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-020-01584-7DOI Listing
August 2020

Perspectives on cross-diagnostic trajectories and outcomes in children's mental health.

Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2020 08;29(8):1031-1033

Fienberg Child Study Center, Schneider Children' Medical Center of Israel, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-020-01584-7DOI Listing
August 2020

Perspectives on cross-diagnostic trajectories and outcomes in children's mental health.

Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2020 08;29(8):1031-1033

Fienberg Child Study Center, Schneider Children' Medical Center of Israel, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-020-01584-7DOI Listing
August 2020

Perspectives on cross-diagnostic trajectories and outcomes in children's mental health.

Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2020 08;29(8):1031-1033

Fienberg Child Study Center, Schneider Children' Medical Center of Israel, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-020-01584-7DOI Listing
August 2020

Explicit Motives, Antecedents, and Consequences of Direct Self-Injurious Behaviors.

Crisis 2018 Jul 8;39(4):255-266. Epub 2017 Dec 8.

3 National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention of Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: Self-injurious behaviors in adolescence are a serious public health concern.

Aims: The current study aims to expand our understanding of motives for direct self-injurious behaviors (D-SIB). We examined the explicit motives but also the actual antecedents and consequences of D-SIB over time.

Method: As part of the Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE) study, adolescents between the ages of 14 and 18 years from Israel completed self-report questionnaires at baseline, 3-month, and 12-month follow-ups.

Results: Decreases in social support predicted later increases in D-SIB, an effect mediated by negative affect. Both peer and parental support also exerted quadratic effects on D-SIB. Thus, low as well as high support predicted subsequent D-SIB. In turn, D-SIB was followed by increased peer and parental support.

Limitations: Our methodology relies on self-reports, affected by social desirability and recall biases.

Conclusion: The findings support a causal path for the development of D-SIB: from interpersonal distress to emotional distress and then to D-SIB. They also point to interesting avenues regarding subgroupings of adolescents who self-injure depending on their motives. Finally, our results reveal that D-SIB, although of negative import, might paradoxically be effective in serving certain functions such as gaining support from parents and peers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1027/0227-5910/a000493DOI Listing
July 2018

Explicit Motives, Antecedents, and Consequences of Direct Self-Injurious Behaviors.

Crisis 2018 Jul 8;39(4):255-266. Epub 2017 Dec 8.

3 National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention of Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: Self-injurious behaviors in adolescence are a serious public health concern.

Aims: The current study aims to expand our understanding of motives for direct self-injurious behaviors (D-SIB). We examined the explicit motives but also the actual antecedents and consequences of D-SIB over time.

Method: As part of the Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE) study, adolescents between the ages of 14 and 18 years from Israel completed self-report questionnaires at baseline, 3-month, and 12-month follow-ups.

Results: Decreases in social support predicted later increases in D-SIB, an effect mediated by negative affect. Both peer and parental support also exerted quadratic effects on D-SIB. Thus, low as well as high support predicted subsequent D-SIB. In turn, D-SIB was followed by increased peer and parental support.

Limitations: Our methodology relies on self-reports, affected by social desirability and recall biases.

Conclusion: The findings support a causal path for the development of D-SIB: from interpersonal distress to emotional distress and then to D-SIB. They also point to interesting avenues regarding subgroupings of adolescents who self-injure depending on their motives. Finally, our results reveal that D-SIB, although of negative import, might paradoxically be effective in serving certain functions such as gaining support from parents and peers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1027/0227-5910/a000493DOI Listing
July 2018

Explicit Motives, Antecedents, and Consequences of Direct Self-Injurious Behaviors.

Crisis 2018 Jul 8;39(4):255-266. Epub 2017 Dec 8.

3 National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention of Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: Self-injurious behaviors in adolescence are a serious public health concern.

Aims: The current study aims to expand our understanding of motives for direct self-injurious behaviors (D-SIB). We examined the explicit motives but also the actual antecedents and consequences of D-SIB over time.

Method: As part of the Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE) study, adolescents between the ages of 14 and 18 years from Israel completed self-report questionnaires at baseline, 3-month, and 12-month follow-ups.

Results: Decreases in social support predicted later increases in D-SIB, an effect mediated by negative affect. Both peer and parental support also exerted quadratic effects on D-SIB. Thus, low as well as high support predicted subsequent D-SIB. In turn, D-SIB was followed by increased peer and parental support.

Limitations: Our methodology relies on self-reports, affected by social desirability and recall biases.

Conclusion: The findings support a causal path for the development of D-SIB: from interpersonal distress to emotional distress and then to D-SIB. They also point to interesting avenues regarding subgroupings of adolescents who self-injure depending on their motives. Finally, our results reveal that D-SIB, although of negative import, might paradoxically be effective in serving certain functions such as gaining support from parents and peers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1027/0227-5910/a000493DOI Listing
July 2018

Life-time prevalence and psychosocial correlates of adolescent direct self-injurious behavior: a comparative study of findings in 11 European countries.

J Child Psychol Psychiatry 2014 Apr 12;55(4):337-48. Epub 2013 Nov 12.

Clinic of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Centre of Psychosocial Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.

Objectives: To investigate the prevalence and associated psychosocial factors of occasional and repetitive direct self-injurious behavior (D-SIB), such as self-cutting, -burning, -biting, -hitting, and skin damage by other methods, in representative adolescent samples from 11 European countries.

Methods: Cross-sectional assessment of adolescents was performed within the European Union funded project, Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE), which was conducted in 11 European countries. The representative sample comprised 12,068 adolescents (F/M: 6,717/5,351; mean age: 14.9 ± 0.89) recruited from randomly selected schools. Frequency of D-SIB was assessed by a modified 6-item questionnaire based on previously used versions of the Deliberate Self-Harm Inventory (DSHI). In addition, a broad range of demographic, social, and psychological factors was assessed.

Results: Overall lifetime prevalence of D-SIB was 27.6%; 19.7% reported occasional D-SIB and 7.8% repetitive D-SIB. Lifetime prevalence ranged from 17.1% to 38.6% across countries. Estonia, France, Germany, and Israel had the highest lifetime rates of D-SIB, while students from Hungary, Ireland, and Italy reported low rates. Suicidality as well as anxiety and depressive symptoms had the highest odds ratios for both occasional and repetitive D-SIB. There was a strong association of D-SIB with both psychopathology and risk-behaviors, including family related neglect and peer-related rejection/victimization. Associations between psychosocial variables and D-SIB were strongly influenced by both gender and country. Only a minor proportion of the adolescents who reported D-SIB ever received medical treatment.

Conclusion: These results suggest high lifetime prevalence of D-SIB in European adolescents. Prevalence as well as psychosocial correlates seems to be significantly influenced by both gender and country. These results support the need for a multidimensional approach to better understand the development of SIB and facilitate culturally adapted prevention/intervention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12166DOI Listing
April 2014

Prevalence of pathological internet use among adolescents in Europe: demographic and social factors.

Addiction 2012 Dec 26;107(12):2210-22. Epub 2012 Jul 26.

National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention of Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Aims: To investigate the prevalence of pathological internet use (PIU) and maladaptive internet use (MIU) among adolescents in 11 European countries in relation to demographic, social factors and internet accessibility.

Design: Cross-sectional survey.

Setting: The 7th Framework European Union (EU) funded project, Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE), is a randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluating interventions for risk behaviours among adolescents in Austria, Estonia, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Romania, Slovenia and Spain, with Sweden serving as the coordinating centre.

Participants: A total of 11 956 adolescents (female/male: 6731/5225; mean age: 14.9 ± 0.89) recruited from randomly selected schools within the 11 study sites.

Measurements: Internet users were classified by gender into three categories: adaptive, maladaptive and pathological, based on their score in the Young Diagnostic Questionnaire for Internet Addiction (YDQ).

Findings: The overall prevalence of PIU was 4.4%; it was higher among males than females (5.2% versus 3.8%) and differed between countries (χ(2)  = 309.98; d.f. = 20; P < 0.001). PIU correlated significantly with mean hours online and male gender. The highest-ranked online activities were watching videos, frequenting chatrooms and social networking; significantly higher rates of playing single-user games were found in males and social networking in females. Living in metropolitan areas was associated with PIU. Students not living with a biological parent, low parental involvement and parental unemployment showed the highest relative risks of both MIU and PIU.

Conclusions: Across a range of countries in Europe, using the Young Diagnostic Questionnaire for Internet Addiction yields a prevalence of 'pathological internet use' of 4.4% among adolescents, but varies by country and gender; adolescents lacking emotional and psychological support are at highest risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2012.03946.xDOI Listing
December 2012
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