Publications by authors named "Shiori Takeuchi"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Whole exome sequencing of fetal structural anomalies detected by ultrasonography.

J Hum Genet 2021 May 3;66(5):499-507. Epub 2020 Nov 3.

Department of Human Genetics, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan.

The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of whole exome sequencing (WES) for the genetic diagnosis of cases presenting with fetal structural anomalies detected by ultrasonography. WES was performed on 19 cases with prenatal structural anomalies. Genomic DNA was extracted from umbilical cords or umbilical blood obtained shortly after birth. WES data were analyzed on prenatal phenotypes alone, and the data were re-analyzed after information regarding the postnatal phenotype was obtained. Based solely on the fetal phenotype, pathogenic, or likely pathogenic, single nucleotide variants were identified in 5 of 19 (26.3%) cases. Moreover, we detected trisomy 21 in two cases by WES-based copy number variation analysis. The overall diagnostic rate was 36.8% (7/19). They were all compatible with respective fetal structural anomalies. By referring to postnatal phenotype information, another candidate variant was identified by a postnatal clinical feature that was not detected in prenatal screening. As detailed phenotyping is desirable for better diagnostic rates in WES analysis, we should be aware that fetal phenotype is a useful, but sometimes limited source of information for comprehensive genetic analysis. It is important to amass more data of genotype-phenotype correlations, especially to appropriately assess the validity of WES in prenatal settings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s10038-020-00869-8DOI Listing
May 2021

Birth of first foals through embryo transfer after artificial insemination using frozen semen in Japan.

J Reprod Dev 2020 Apr 26;66(2):193-197. Epub 2020 Jan 26.

Department of Clinical Veterinary Sciences, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido 080-8555, Japan.

Until now, there have been no reports of foals born through embryo transfer after artificial insemination using frozen semen in Japan. The aims of this study were to develop a riding crossbred horse and evaluate the prospects of embryo transfer technology in multiplying horse population. In both donor and recipient mares, luteolysis was induced by the administration of 0.1 mg Cloprostenol to synchronize the onset of estrus, and ovulation was induced by administering 2000 IU human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) or 0.75 mg Deslorelin. Frozen semen from an Irish Connemara pony stallion was used to breed a Hokkaido native pony mare by deep-horn artificial insemination (dose, 400 × 10 sperm). A non-surgical technique was used to collect embryos from the donor mare at day 7 post-ovulation and transfer them transcervically into the uterus of recipient mares (n = 4) immediately after collection. Weekly blood samples were collected from the recipients throughout pregnancy. A total of four embryos were recovered from seven collection attempts (57% recovery) from a donor mare in a single breeding season. Three of the four transferred embryos maintained successful pregnancy and delivered a healthy live foal (75% birth). A normal progesterone profile was observed throughout gestation in recipient mares. In conclusion, for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, this study describes the birth of foals through non-surgical transcervical embryo transfer in Japan after artificial insemination using frozen semen. We expect that this new crossbreed (Connemara pony × Hokkaido native pony) will be a good riding breed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1262/jrd.2019-117DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7175392PMC
April 2020

Hereditary angioedema with deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism during pregnancy.

Taiwan J Obstet Gynecol 2019 Nov;58(6):895-896

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tjog.2019.04.003DOI Listing
November 2019

Interaction of a bacterial flagellar chaperone FlgN with FlhA is required for efficient export of its cognate substrates.

Mol Microbiol 2012 Feb 11;83(4):775-88. Epub 2012 Jan 11.

Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, 1-3 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan.

FlgN chaperone acts as a bodyguard to protect its cognate substrates, FlgK and FlgL, from proteolysis in the cytoplasm. Docking of the FlgN-FlgK complex with the FliI ATPase of the flagellar type III export apparatus is key to the protein export process. However, a ΔfliH-fliI flhB(P28T) mutant forms some flagella even in the absence of FliH and FliI, raising the question of how FlgN promotes the export of its cognate substrates. Here, we report that the interaction of FlgN with an integral membrane export protein, FlhA, is directly involved in efficient protein export. A ΔfliH-fliI flhB(P28T) ΔflgN mutant caused extragenic suppressor mutations in the C-terminal domain of FlhA (FlhA(C) ). Pull-down assays using GST affinity chromatography showed an interaction between FlgN and FlhA(C) . The FlgN-FlgK complex bound to FlhA(C) and FliJ to form the FlgN-FlgK-FliJ-FlhA(C) complex. The FlgN-FlhA(C) interaction was enhanced by FlgK but not by FliJ. FlgN120 missing the last 20 residues still bound to FlgK and FliJ but not to FlhA(C) . A highly conserved Tyr-122 residue was required for the interaction with FlhA(C) . These results suggest that FlgN efficiently transfers FlgK/L subunits to FlhA(C) to promote their export.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2958.2011.07964.xDOI Listing
February 2012