Publications by authors named "Shinichiro Asakawa"

10 Publications

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Renal Involvement as Rare Acute Tubulointerstitial Nephritis in a Patient with Eosinophilic Disorder Treated with Early Add-on Administration of Mepolizumab.

Intern Med 2021 Jun 5. Epub 2021 Jun 5.

Department of Internal Medicine, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Japan.

A 39-year-old man presented with peripheral eosinophilia, pulmonary eosinophilic infiltrate, and renal failure due to acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN). He had experienced childhood asthma and was negative for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA). He was tentatively diagnosed with ANCA-negative eosinophilic granulomatous polyangiitis (EGPA) or idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES). Renal involvement of isolated TIN with eosinophil infiltration is rare in EGPA and HES and does not seem to have a good prognosis in the literature. However, his condition improved well with corticosteroids and mepolizumab. The revised classification of EGPA based on the etiology should dictate the proper treatment in suspected EGPA patients with nonsystemic vasculitis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2169/internalmedicine.7490-21DOI Listing
June 2021

A Ruptured Jejunal Arterial Aneurysm in a Young Woman Undergoing Chronic Hemodialysis Due to Myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-associated Vasculitis.

Intern Med 2021 Mar 29. Epub 2021 Mar 29.

Department of Internal Medicine, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Japan.

A 21-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of massive intestinal bleeding. She started hemodialysis due to myeloperoxidase antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) at 18 years of age. Her ANCA titers remained stable; however, her C-reactive protein increased on 5 mg/day prednisolone before admission. Computed tomography angiography revealed a ruptured jejunal arterial aneurysm. Transcatheter arterial embolization, blood transfusion and the reinforcement of steroid therapy resolved her symptoms of AAV. Our case of a young patient with AAV and medium-sized arterial vasculitis is rare and emphasizes that the ANCA titer does not always rise, especially in patients with nonrenal vasculitis flare-ups.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2169/internalmedicine.6721-20DOI Listing
March 2021

Pyuria without Casts and Bilateral Kidney Enlargement Are Probable Hallmarks of Severe Acute Kidney Injury Induced by Acute Pyelonephritis: A Case Report and Literature Review.

Intern Med 2021 Jan 5;60(2):293-298. Epub 2020 Sep 5.

Department of Internal Medicine, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Japan.

The patient was a 38-year-old man who had experienced nausea and fever for a few days and presented with back pain, oliguria, and pyuria, suggesting acute pyelonephritis (APN). He showed acute kidney injury (AKI) with bilateral kidney enlargement and was using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). AKI-induced by APN was confirmed by kidney biopsy. The AKI was successfully treated with antibiotic therapy. A search of the relevant literature for reports on histopathologically-proven APN-induced severe AKI revealed that the key characteristics were bilateral kidney enlargement with pyuria without casts. Oligoanuria was frequently associated with APN-induced severe AKI, and NSAID use may be a possible risk factor. Prompt antibiotic treatment based on the clinical characteristics of APN-induced AKI can improve the renal outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2169/internalmedicine.5721-20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7872795PMC
January 2021

ABCG2 expression and uric acid metabolism of the intestine in hyperuricemia model rat.

Nucleosides Nucleotides Nucleic Acids 2020 25;39(5):744-759. Epub 2020 Jan 25.

Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

To elucidate roles of the intestine in uric acid (UA) metabolism, we examined ABCG2 expression, tissue UA content and xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) activity in different intestinal segments. Male SD rats were assigned to control group or oxonic acid-induced hyperuricemia (HUA) group. In control rats, ABCG2 was present both in villi and crypts in each segment. Tissue UA content and XOR activity were relatively high in duodenum and jejunum. However, in HUA rats, tissue UA content was significantly elevated in the ileum, whereas it remained unaltered in other segments. Moreover, ABCG2 expression in the HUA group was upregulated both in the villi and crypts of the ileum. These data indicate that the ileum may play an important role in the extra-renal UA excretion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15257770.2019.1694684DOI Listing
December 2020

A Patient with MPO-ANCA-positive IgA Nephropathy Diagnosed with the Clinical Onset of Macrohematuria.

Intern Med 2019 Jul 28;58(14):2051-2056. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

Department of Internal Medicine, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Japan.

A 21-year-old woman presented with renal dysfunction during macrohematuria. A kidney biopsy revealed IgA nephropathy with a small percentage of crescent formation and macrohematuria-associated tubular injury. Macrohematuria-associated acute kidney injury could explain her renal dysfunction. However, she was seropositive for myeloperoxidase (MPO)-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) and showed fibrin deposition around one arteriole. Corticosteroids and mycophenolate mofetil were administered as for ANCA vasculitis, and the serum creatinine, abnormal urinalysis and MPO-ANCA titer all gradually ameliorated. The presence of extra-glomerular vasculitis, which was probably induced by ANCA, suggested that MPO-ANCA was an exacerbating factor for her prolonged renal dysfunction. This condition has so far only rarely been addressed in ANCA-positive IgA nephropathy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2169/internalmedicine.2475-18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6702016PMC
July 2019

Discontinuation of Hemodialysis in a Patient with Anti-GBM Disease by the Treatment with Corticosteroids and Plasmapheresis despite Several Predictors for Dialysis-Dependence.

Case Rep Nephrol 2017 11;2017:7143649. Epub 2017 Oct 11.

Department of Internal Medicine, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo, Japan.

A 26-year-old man highly suspected of having antiglomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease was treated with corticosteroid pulse therapy 9 days after initial infection-like symptoms with high procalcitonin value. The patient required hemodialysis the next day of the treatment due to oliguria. In addition to corticosteroid therapy, plasmapheresis was introduced and the patient could discontinue hemodialysis 43 days after the treatment. Kidney biopsy after initiation of hemodialysis confirmed anti-GBM disease with 86.3% crescent formation. Physician should keep in mind that active anti-GBM disease shows even high procalcitonin value in the absence of infection. To pursue recovery of renal function, the challenge of the immediate and persistent treatment with high-dose corticosteroids plus plasmapheresis for highly suspected anti-GBM disease is vitally important despite the presence of reported predictors for dialysis-dependence including oliguria and requiring hemodialysis at presentation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2017/7143649DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5660776PMC
October 2017

Podocyte Injury and Albuminuria in Experimental Hyperuricemic Model Rats.

Oxid Med Cell Longev 2017 28;2017:3759153. Epub 2017 Feb 28.

Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605, Japan.

Although hyperuricemia is shown to accelerate chronic kidney disease, the mechanisms remain unclear. Accumulating studies also indicate that uric acid has both pro- and antioxidant properties. We postulated that hyperuricemia impairs the function of glomerular podocytes, resulting in albuminuria. Hyperuricemic model was induced by oral administration of 2% oxonic acid, a uricase inhibitor. Oxonic acid caused a twofold increase in serum uric acid levels at 8 weeks when compared to control animals. Hyperuricemia in this model was associated with the increase in blood pressure and the wall-thickening of afferent arterioles as well as arcuate arteries. Notably, hyperuricemic rats showed significant albuminuria, and the podocyte injury marker, desmin, was upregulated in the glomeruli. Conversely, podocin, the key component of podocyte slit diaphragm, was downregulated. Structural analysis using transmission electron microscopy confirmed podocyte injury in this model. We found that urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine levels were significantly increased and correlated with albuminuria and podocytopathy. Interestingly, although the superoxide dismutase mimetic, tempol, ameliorated the vascular changes and the hypertension, it failed to reduce albuminuria, suggesting that vascular remodeling and podocyte injury in this model are mediated through different mechanisms. In conclusion, vasculopathy and podocytopathy may distinctly contribute to the kidney injury in a hyperuricemic state.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2017/3759153DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5350416PMC
April 2017

Rapid Deterioration of the Renal Function Caused by the Coexistence of Intratubular Amyloidosis and Myeloma Cast Nephropathy.

Intern Med 2015 1;54(23):3023-8. Epub 2015 Dec 1.

Department of Internal Medicine, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Japan.

Multiple myeloma presents with various kidney injuries, including cast nephropathy, light chain deposition disease, and amyloidosis. Cast nephropathy is the most common form and mostly consists of monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains with Tamm-Horsfall protein. Immunoglobulin light chain (AL) amyloidosis may affect all compartments of the kidney, but it is rare in the tubuli. We herein present a rare case with rapid progression of renal failure caused by the co-occurrence of intratubular amyloidosis and cast nephropathy due to multiple myeloma. Our case suggests unique amyloidogenic light chain cast, which can form amyloid fibrils under specific tubular fluid conditions, and illustrates the complicated light chain pathophysiology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2169/internalmedicine.54.5174DOI Listing
July 2016

Predictors and the Subsequent Risk of End-Stage Renal Disease - Usefulness of 30% Decline in Estimated GFR over 2 Years.

PLoS One 2015 15;10(7):e0132927. Epub 2015 Jul 15.

Department of Internal Medicine, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Background: A goal of searching risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD) is to halt progressing to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by potential intervention. To predict the future ESRD, 30% decline in estimated GFR over 2 years was examined in comparison with other time-dependent predictors.

Methods: CKD patients who had measurement of serum creatinine at baseline and 2 years were enrolled (n = 701) and followed up to 6 years. Time-dependent parameters were calculated as time-averaged values over 2 years by a trapezoidal rule. Risk factors affecting the incidence of ESRD were investigated by the extended Cox proportional hazard model with baseline dataset and 2-year time-averaged dataset. Predictive significance of 30% decline in estimated GFR over 2 years for ESRD was analyzed.

Results: For predicting ESRD, baseline estimated GFR and proteinuria were the most influential risk factors either with the baseline dataset or the 2-year time-averaged dataset. Using the 2-year time-averaged dataset, 30% decline in estimated GFR over 2 years by itself showed the highest HR of 31.6 for ESRD whereas addition of baseline estimated GFR, proteinuria, serum albumin and hemoglobin yielded a better model by a multivariate Cox regression model. This novel surrogate was mostly associated with time-averaged proteinuria over 2 years with the cut-off of ~1 g/g creatinine.

Conclusion: These results suggest that decline in estimated GFR and proteinuria are the risk factors while serum albumin and hemoglobin are the protective factors by the time-to-event analysis. Future incidence of ESRD is best predicted by 30% decline in eGFR over 2 years that can be modified by intervention to proteinuria, hemoglobin, uric acid, phosphorus, blood pressure and use of renin-angiotensin system inhibitors in the follow-up of 2 years.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0132927PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4503403PMC
April 2016

Therapeutic dose of acetaminophen as a possible risk factor for acute kidney injury: learning from two healthy young adult cases.

Intern Med 2014 15;53(14):1531-4. Epub 2014 Jul 15.

Department of Internal Medicine, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Japan.

Acetaminophen overdose can lead to severe liver and kidney failure; however, the risk of therapeutic doses in healthy individuals causing acute kidney injury (AKI) is less clear. We herein describe the cases of two young adults with renal biopsy-proven acute tubular necrosis under a therapeutic dose of acetaminophen. The first patient exhibited mild reversible renal insufficiency, whereas, in the second case, the patient demonstrated a slightly increased serum creatinine level and enlarged kidneys and the administration of contrast media and antibiotics may have worsened the renal dysfunction, leading to the need for temporal hemodialysis. Physicians should be aware of the risk of acetaminophen causing AKI and avoid administering other nephrotoxic agents in such cases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2169/internalmedicine.53.1502DOI Listing
June 2015