Publications by authors named "Shilen V Lakhani"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and thiamine deficiency after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery in obese patients.

Nutr Res 2008 May;28(5):293-8

Department of Medicine, Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC 20010-2975, USA.

It has been proposed that thiamine deficiency after gastric bypass surgery in obese patients results from prolonged nausea and emesis. We hypothesized that thiamine deficiency is induced by altered gut ecology. This report includes 2 retrospective studies of obese patients who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery at our institution from 1999 to 2005. In the first study, 80 patients (52 women and 28 men) had measurement of whole-blood thiamine diphosphate level and serum folate level. In these 80 patients, 39 (49%) had thiamine diphosphate levels less than the lower limit of the reference range, and 28 (72%) of the 39 had folate levels higher than the upper limit of the reference range, an indicator of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. In 41 patients with normal thiamine levels, only 14 (34%) had folate levels higher than the upper limit of the reference range (chi(2) test, P < .01). In the second study, 21 patients (17 women and 4 men) had thiamine diphosphate levels less than the lower limit of the reference range and abnormal glucose-hydrogen breath tests, consistent with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Fifteen patients received oral thiamine supplements, but repeated thiamine levels remained low in all 15. Nine of these patients then received oral antibiotic therapy; repeated thiamine levels were found to be normal in all 9 patients. These results support the hypothesis that small intestinal bacterial overgrowth results from altered gut ecology and induces thiamine deficiency after gastric bypass surgery in obese patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nutres.2008.03.002DOI Listing
May 2008

Major noncardiac surgery following coronary stenting: when is it safe to operate?

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv 2004 Oct;63(2):141-5

Division of Cardiology, Washington Hospital Center, Washington, District of Columbia 20010, USA.

The optimal timing for elective noncardiac surgery (NCS) after coronary stenting is uncertain. We identified 47 patients who underwent elective NCS within 90 days of coronary stent placement between January 1995 and December 2000. Twenty-seven patients had NCS within 3 weeks of coronary stenting. Six of the seven in whom thienopyridine antiplatelet therapy was discontinued died postoperatively in a manner suggestive of stent thrombosis. In contrast, only 1 of the 20 patients in whom the thienopyridine was continued through the NCS died. The frequency of perioperative hemorrhage was similar whether or not the antiplatelet agent was continued. Only 1 perioperative death occurred in the 20 patients with NCS more than 3 weeks following stenting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ccd.20124DOI Listing
October 2004