Publications by authors named "Shihua Shi"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Yanyu Decoction for Aged Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2021 17;2021:6615035. Epub 2021 Apr 17.

Hospital of Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China.

Background: There was limited evidence of treatments aiming at aged coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. Yanyu decoction (YD) has been used as adjuvant therapy in aged patients with stable CAD and might be a new treatment worthy of recommendation for CAD patients. This study was to evaluate the combined effects of YD plus conventional pharmaceutical treatment (CPT) on senile patients with stable CAD.

Methods: This review was designed according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reported Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis) recommendations. A literature search was conducted in seven electronic databases from their inception until August 2020. Primary outcomes of interest were adverse cardiovascular events, including cardiac mortality, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and unstable angina (UA). The secondary outcomes were blood lipids and hemorheology. Studies were pooled to calculate the risk ratio or weighted mean difference and corresponding 95% confidence interval.

Results: Five studies recruiting 848 aged patients with stable CAD were included. Patients receiving YD as an adjuvant have fewer adverse cardiovascular events, including cardiac mortality, AMI, and UA. Besides, YD plus CPT has a better effect on reducing triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and improving high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Moreover, significant effects of YD plus CPT for reducing blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, and platelet aggregation rate were found compared with CPT alone.

Conclusion: YD plus CPT showed better efficacy than CPT on reducing adverse cardiovascular events and improving hemorheology and blood lipids for aged patients with stable CAD. Our findings may suggest YD as an adjuvant natural-based treatment for CAD. However, more rigorous and larger trials are essential to validate our results, and further consideration of CAD studies specific to aged patients is needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2021/6615035DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8075676PMC
April 2021

The effect of Chinese herbal medicine on digestive system and liver functions should not be neglected in COVID-19: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis.

IUBMB Life 2021 05 2;73(5):739-760. Epub 2021 Apr 2.

Hospital of Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, China.

Gastrointestinal symptoms and liver injury are common in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, profiles of different pharmaceutical interventions used are relatively underexplored. Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) has been increasingly used for patients with COVID-19, but the efficacy of CHM used in COVID-19 on gastrointestinal symptoms and liver functions has not been well studied with definitive results based on the updated studies. The present study aimed at testing the efficacy of CHM on digestive symptoms and liver function (primary outcomes), the aggravation of COVID-19, and the time to viral assay conversion (secondary outcomes), among patients with COVID-19, compared with standard pharmacotherapy. The literature search was undertaken in 11 electronic databases from December 1, 2019 up to November 8, 2020. Appraisal of the evidence was conducted with Cochrane risk of bias tool or Newcastle Ottawa Scale. A random-effects model or subgroup analysis was conducted when significant heterogeneity was identified in the meta-analysis. The certainty of the evidence was assessed with the grading of recommendations assessment, development, and evaluation approach. Forty-eight included trials involving 4,704 participants were included. Meta-analyses favored CHM plus standard pharmacotherapy for COVID-19 on reducing the aggravation of COVID-19 and the time to viral assay conversion compared with standard pharmacotherapy. However, the present CHM as a complementary therapy for treating COVID-19 may not be beneficial for improving most gastrointestinal symptoms and liver function based on the current evidence. More well-conducted trials are warranted to confirm the potential efficacy of CHM furtherly.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/iub.2467DOI Listing
May 2021

Corn silk decoction for blood lipid in patients with angina pectoris: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Phytother Res 2019 Nov 18;33(11):2862-2869. Epub 2019 Aug 18.

Hospital of Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, China.

The aims of this study were to evaluate the efficacy of corn silk decoction on lipid profile in patients with angina pectoris. PubMed, Cochrane, Embase, Google Scholar, Chongqing VIP Chinese Science and Technology Periodical Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang database were searched up to January 2019 for randomized controlled trials that assessed the impact of corn silk decoction on total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in patients with angina pectoris. Study evaluation and synthesis methods were in accordance with the Cochrane Handbook, and data were analyzed using Review Manager (version 5.3) software. Random effects model was applied in this systematic review and meta-analysis to compensate for potential heterogeneity among the included studies. A total of four randomized controlled trials were eligible for meta-analysis. Pooled results of these studies indicated that corn silk decoction might improve high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and reduce total cholesterol, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in patients with angina pectoris. Subgroup analyses showed that corn silk decoction or modified corn silk decoction plus conventional pharmaceutical treatment could have favorable effects on blood lipids. However, the lack of blinding in most studies may have led to overestimation of these effects. Further studies with better design are needed to confirm these findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ptr.6474DOI Listing
November 2019

Corn Silk Tea for Hypertension: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2019 17;2019:2915498. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Cardiovascular Diseases Center, Xiyuan Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100091, China.

Corn silk, a traditional Chinese medicine, has been found to exert an antihypertensive effect in clinical practice and trials. However, systematic review of current evidence on this topic was not available. Thus, this study aims to assess safety and efficacy of corn silk tea (CST) in improving clinical outcomes in patients with hypertension. A systematic literature search was conducted through popular electronic databases up to October 2018. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing CST plus conventional antihypertensive drugs with conventional antihypertensive drugs alone were included. The main outcome was total blood pressure lowering efficacy. The risk of bias assessment according to the Cochrane Handbook was used to evaluate the methodological quality of the included trials. Review Manager 5.3 software was used for data analyses. Five RCTs involving 567 participants were included. Due to the poor quality of methodologies of most trials, limited evidence showed that CST plus antihypertensive drugs might be more effective in lowering blood pressure compared with antihypertensive drugs alone (RR = 1.27; 95% CI: 1.17 to 1.38, <0.00001; heterogeneity: = 0.51, = 0%, fixed-effect model). However, there is no evidence that CST plus conventional antihypertensive drugs has less adverse events than conventional antihypertensive drugs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2019/2915498DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6354158PMC
January 2019

[Retrospective study on incomplete intestinal obstruction treated with the adjuvant therapy of acupuncture and moxibustion].

Zhongguo Zhen Jiu 2018 Jul;38(7):707-10

General Surgery Department, Beijing Royal Integrative Medicine Hospital, Beijing 102209, China.

Objective: To evaluate the clinical effects on incomplete intestinal obstruction treated with the adjuvant therapy of acupuncture and moxibustion.

Methods: Using the retrospective analysis, 80 patients of incomplete intestinal obstruction were divided into an observation group and a control group, 40 cases in each one. In the control group, the routine treatment was given, such as fasting, gastrointestinal decompression, parenteral nutrition, infection prevention with antibiotics and enema laxative. In the observation group, on the basis of the treatment as the control group, acupuncture was applied at bilateral Zusanli (ST 36), Shangjuxu (ST 37) and Xiajuxu (ST 39); moxibustion was used at left Yangchi (TE 4), Zhongwan (CV 12), Qihai (CV 6) and Guanyuan (CV 4). The treatment was given once a day, 30 min each time. The average days of treatment, the surgical transfer rate, the time to first flatus, the recovery time of defecation and the time of solid food intake were observed in the patients of the two groups.

Results: The average days of treatment in the observation group was obviously less than that in the control group (<0.05). The surgical transfer rate in the observation group was obviously lower than that in the control group (<0.05). The time to first flatus, the recovery time of defecation and the time of solid food intake were all obviously earlier than those in the control group (all <0.05).

Conclusion: The adjuvant therapy of acupuncture and moxibustion achieves the significant therapeutic effects on incomplete intestinal obstruction, shortens the treatment duration and reduces the surgical transfer rate and the patient's economic burden.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.13703/j.0255-2930.2018.07.006DOI Listing
July 2018

Effects of Xuebijing Injection for Patients With Sepsis-induced Acute Kidney Injury After Wenchuan Earthquake.

Altern Ther Health Med 2017 Mar;23(2):36-42

Context • Earthquakes are devastating disasters that have claimed countless lives in the past, partially owing to the danger of direct and indirect injuries to vital organs. In the deadly earthquake that occurred in Sichuan Province of China on May 12, 2008, some victims suffered from severe damage to multiple organs and tissue and developed sepsis, a systematic inflammatory reaction resulting from infection and trauma. Xuebijing injection (CCXG) could beneficial for improvement of clinical symptoms in those patients, but no research has yet examined its potential. Objective • The study intended to investigate whether a combination of conventional treatment and CCXG was superior to conventional treatment alone, or the control group (CG), in the treatment of clinical symptoms in patients with sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI). Design • The study retrospectively analyzed the medical records of individuals who were injured in an earthquake that occurred in the Sichuan Province of China on May 12, 2008, and who developed AKI. Setting • The study took place in the hospital associated with Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Chengdu, Sichuan, China). Participants • Participants were 55 injured individuals who were treated at the hospital. The CG included 27 patients and the CCXG group included 28 patients. Intervention • Both the intervention group (CCXG group) and the CG received the conventional treatment. The CCXG group was also given intravenous drips containing 100 mL of CCXG. The CG was given 100 mL of a 10% normal saline injection in addition to conventional treatment. Both received the treatments within 30 to 40 min, 3 ×/d. Outcome Measures • Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatine phosphate kinase (CPK), serum creatinine (Cr), interleukin 1 (IL-1), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) were measured before treatment and on days 5, 7, and 10 after treatment. Results • The levels of CPK, BUN, Cr, and IL-6 for both groups were significantly lower than at baseline on day 5, 7, and 10 after treatment (P < .05). The levels of the CCXG group were significantly lower than those of the CG group on days 5, 7, and 10 (P < .05). Conclusions • As a supplement, CCXG is an effective method of improving the clinical symptoms of sepsis-induced AKI.
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March 2017