Publications by authors named "Shigeo Aoki"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Hepatectomy for rapidly growing solitary liver metastasis from non-small cell lung cancer: a case report.

Surg Case Rep 2019 May 2;5(1):71. Epub 2019 May 2.

Department of Thoracic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan.

Background: Patients with liver metastasis from non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) usually have multiple metastases at other sites and thus rarely undergo liver surgery. We present a case involving successful resection of rapidly growing liver metastasis from squamous cell carcinoma of the lung.

Case Presentation: A 74-year-old man had undergone left lower lobectomy for squamous cell carcinoma of the lung, which was diagnosed pathologically as stage IA. A computed tomography (CT) scan that was taken 12 months after lung resection showed an irregularly shaped mass lesion (size, 8.3 cm) in segment five of the liver. Retrospectively, the mass was identifiable on CT 6 months before this initial recognition. Although the lesion showed rapid growth, positron emission tomography and brain magnetic resonance imaging ruled out the possibility of other metastatic lesions. Therefore, we performed right hepatectomy 14 months after the initial lung surgery. The patient was pathologically diagnosed with liver metastasis from lung cancer and has remained free from recurrence 41 months after the liver surgery, without receiving any adjuvant chemotherapy.

Conclusions: Although there is no reliable clinical indicator for selecting oligo-recurrence, hepatectomy could be an option for solitary liver metastasis from NSCLC for patients who are in good health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40792-019-0633-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6497696PMC
May 2019

Giant insulinoma: report of a case and review of published reports.

Surg Case Rep 2016 Dec 19;2(1):136. Epub 2016 Nov 19.

Department of Surgery, Hitachi General Hospital, 2-1-1 Jonan-cho, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0077, Japan.

Background: Larger insulinomas are reportedly more likely to be malignant; however, their biological behavior has not been clearly elucidated. We here report the characteristics and treatment of a giant insulinoma with local invasion and lymph node metastasis. We also review published reports concerning the clinical features of giant insulinomas and comparing their grading with that of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

Case Presentation: A 71-year-old man was referred to our hospital for investigation of persistent hypoglycemia. On the current presentation, laboratory tests showed serum glucose, immunoreactive insulin, and C peptide concentrations of 45 mg/dL, 17.2 μIU/mL and 4.1 ng/mL, respectively. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging showed a hypervascular tumor measuring 13.5 cm in the head of the pancreas. Computed tomography scanning demonstrated local invasion and lymph node involvement. He thus had Whipple's triad, which is associated with malignant insulinoma. No distant metastases having been identified, pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. Intraoperatively, three separate tumors were identified in the pancreatic head. Pathological examination showed all three tumors were pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors; the tumor cells in the largest mass were strongly immunoreactive for insulin. The Ki-67 index was 2-5% in most parts of the largest tumor and over 20% in the poorly differentiated areas. This tumor was classified as neuroendocrine carcinoma in accordance with the 2010 World Health Organization classification of pancreatic endocrine neoplasms. He remains free of evidence of recurrence 2 years postsurgery. A review of published reports indicated that giant insulinomas are more malignant than smaller ones, and metastatic disease is found on presentation in 56% of patients with giant insulinomas; however, we were unable to identify any correlation between grade of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor and biological behavior of giant insulinomas.

Conclusions: Giant insulinomas more frequently exhibit malignant behavior, such as local invasion, lymph node involvement, and liver metastasis, than smaller ones. However, there was no relationship between grade and rate of metastases or survival in this small case series. Identification of useful biological markers is necessary.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40792-016-0265-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5116022PMC
December 2016

Primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the liver: a case report and review of the literature.

Surg Case Rep 2016 Dec 1;2(1):87. Epub 2016 Sep 1.

Department of Surgery, Hitachi General Hospital, 2-1-1 Jonan-cho, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0077, Japan.

Background: Recently, gastrointestinal stromal tumors that have developed outside of the digestive tract have been reported. These tumors are collectively termed extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumors can also develop in the liver. Only eight case reports involving primary GIST of the liver have been published. We report a case and review the literature regarding this disease.

Case Presentation: A 70-year-old woman with a past history of gastric cancer visited our hospital for regular inspection. With extensive radiological imaging, a computed tomography scan revealed a mass with a size of 6.8 cm in the lateral segment of the liver. (18)F-Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed no other malignancies except for the liver tumor. Because the lesion was suspected of being a primary malignant hepatic tumor, lateral segmentectomy was performed. The immunohistochemical analysis supported the diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors in the liver. The patient has had no evidence of recurrence during the 10-month follow-up period; imatinib chemotherapy was not administered.

Conclusions: Primary hepatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors had no characteristics that distinguished them from ordinary tumors in imaging examinations. Primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors might have developed from interstitial Cajal-like cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40792-016-0218-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5009116PMC
December 2016

Level of arterial ligation in sigmoid colon and rectal cancer surgery.

World J Surg Oncol 2016 Apr 1;14:99. Epub 2016 Apr 1.

Department of Surgical Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, the University of Tokyo Hospital, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033, Japan.

Background: Curative resection of sigmoid colon and rectal cancer includes "high tie" of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA). However, IMA ligation compromises blood flow to the anastomosis, which may increase the leakage rate, and it is unclear whether this confers a survival advantage. Accordingly, the IMA may be ligated at a point just below the origin of the left colic artery (LCA) "low tie" combined with lymph node dissection (LND) around the origin of the IMA (low tie with LND). However, no study has investigated the detailed prognostic results between "high tie" and "low tie with LND." The aim of this study was to assess the utility of "low tie with LND" on survival in patients with sigmoid colon or rectal cancer.

Methods: A total of 189 sigmoid colon or rectal cancer patients who underwent curative operation from 1997 to 2007 were enrolled in this study. The patient's medical records were reviewed to obtain clinicopathological information. Overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, with differences assessed using log-rank test.

Results: Forty-two and 147 patients were ligated at the origin of the IMA (high tie) and just below the origin of the LCA combined with LND around the origin of the IMA (low tie with LND), respectively. No significant differences were observed in the complication rate and OS and RFS rates in the two groups. Further, no significant difference was observed in the OS and RFS rates in the lymph node-positive cases in the two groups.

Conclusions: "Low tie with LND" is anatomically less invasive and is not inferior to "high tie" with prognostic point of view.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12957-016-0819-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4818479PMC
April 2016

Risk factors for lymph node metastasis from gastric cancers with submucosal invasion.

Ann Surg Oncol 2010 Jun 4;17(6):1597-604. Epub 2010 Feb 4.

Division of Gastroenterological & General Surgery, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan.

Background: Accurate prediction of the metastatic status of lymph nodes (LNs) is clinically important for selecting treatment strategies in patients with gastric cancer with submucosal invasion (GCSM). In this study, we determined the risk factors for lymph node metastasis (LNM), including micrometastasis, in patients with GCSM.

Materials And Methods: A total of 5610 LNs dissected from 189 patients with GCSM who had undergone a standard gastrectomy were immunostained with CAM 5.2 monoclonal antibody to detect LN micrometastasis. Clinicopathological risk factors for lymph node metastasis (LNM), including micrometastasis, were determined.

Results: LNM was detected in 216 LNs (107 macroscopic metastases, 72 micrometastases, and 37 isolated tumor cells) in 55 (29.1%) of the 189 patients with GCSM. A multivariate analysis revealed that a tumor size of more than 20 mm, a mixed- or undifferentiated-type histology, a vertical tumor invasion depth in the submucosal layer (VTIDSM) of more than 0.5 mm, and the presence of lymphatic vessel invasion (LVI) were independent risk factors for LNM. The incidences of LNM in patients with 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 risk factors were 0, 4.5, 11.4, 36.1, and 52.9%, respectively. Among the patients with only 1 or 2 risk factors, all the metastatic lesions were located only in the first tier. On the other hand, LNM in the second tier was also detected in 24.5% of the patients with more than 3 risk factors.

Conclusions: Tumor size, histologic type, VTIDSM, and LVI are important risk factors for predicting the presence and extent of LNM in patients with GCSM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1245/s10434-010-0930-6DOI Listing
June 2010

Gastric and intestinal phenotypic marker expression in early differentiated-type tumors of the stomach: clinicopathologic significance and genetic background.

Clin Cancer Res 2006 Nov;12(21):6469-79

Division of General and Gastroenterological Surgery, Department of Surgery and Clinical Research Laboratory, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Purpose: Gastric and intestinal phenotypic cell markers are expressed in gastric carcinomas, irrespective of their histologic type. In the present study, we determined the clinicopathologic significance of phenotypic marker expression in early-stage gastric differentiated-type tumors and the association between marker expression and genetic alterations.

Experimental Design: Phenotypic marker expression was determined by examining the expressions of human gastric mucin (HGM), MUC6, MUC2, and CD10 in 63 gastric adenomas, 133 early differentiated-type carcinomas, and 24 follow-up cases with gastric adenoma. Tumors were classified into gastric, gastric and intestinal mixed, or intestinal phenotypes according to the immunopositivity of the above markers. The presence of mutations in APC, K-ras, and p53 and the microsatellite instability status were also determined in all tumors.

Results: The expressions of HGM and MUC6, representing gastric or gastric and intestinal mixed phenotypes, were significantly associated with high-grade atypia in the 63 gastric adenomas. Among the 133 early differentiated-type carcinomas, HGM expression was significantly associated with mixed-type (with an undifferentiated-type component) tumors and lymph node metastasis. MUC2 expression was inversely associated with submucosal invasion. A multivariate analysis revealed that gastric adenomas were significantly associated with the intestinal phenotype and were inversely associated with p53 mutation compared with early differentiated-type carcinomas. Among all 196 tumors, APC mutation was significantly associated with CD10 expression and the intestinal phenotype and was inversely associated with the expressions of HGM and MUC6. The microsatellite instability status was significantly associated with MUC6 expression. Malignant transformation from gastric adenoma to carcinoma was shown in 5 of the 24 follow-up cases of gastric adenoma. The malignant transformation was significantly associated with the gastric and intestinal mixed phenotype and was inversely associated with APC mutation. No malignant transformation was found in intestinal phenotype gastric adenomas with APC mutation.

Conclusions: Our present findings show that phenotypic marker expression is associated with tumor aggressiveness during the early stage of gastric differentiated-type tumors. Differences in the biological behavior of tumors with different phenotypes may result from differences in the genetic backgrounds during the incipient phase of gastric tumorigenesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-06-1339DOI Listing
November 2006

Tumor differentiation phenotype in gastric differentiated-type tumors and its relation to tumor invasion and genetic alterations.

World J Gastroenterol 2006 Jun;12(24):3803-9

Department of Surgery, Division of General and Gastroenterological Surgery, Showa University, School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Aim: To clarify the relations between tumor differentiation phenotype and tumor invasion or genetic alterations in gastric differentiated-type tumors.

Methods: We examined the tumor differentiation phenotype, the presence of mutations in APC and p53, and the microsatellite instability (MSI) status in 48 gastric adenomas and 171 differentiated-type carcinomas. The tumor differentiation phenotype was determined by examining the expression of human gastric mucin (HGM), MUC6, MUC2 and CD10. The tumors were then classified into gastric- (G-), gastric and intestinal mixed- (GI-), or intestinal- (I-) phenotypes, according to the immunopositivity of the above markers. The presence of mutations in APC and p53 and the MSI status were also investigated in all the tumors.

Results: Gastric adenomas were significantly associated with CD10 expression, I-phenotype tumors and the presence of APC mutations, compared with carcinomas (66.7% vs 25.1%, P < 0.0001; 56.3% vs 14.6%, P < 0.0001; 39.6% vs 14.0%, P < 0.0001, respectively) and inversely associated with expressions of HGM and MUC6 and the presence of p53 mutations (10.4% vs 62.6%, P < 0.0001; 39.6% vs 64.3%, P = 0.003; 2.0% vs 26.3%, P = 0.001, respectively). The frequency of APC mutations was significantly higher in HGM-negative tumors, MUC6-negative tumors, CD10-positive tumors and I-phenotype tumors than in HGM-positive tumors, MUC6-positive tumors, CD10-negative tumors and G-phenotype tumors (32.7% vs 7.1%, P < 0.0001; 27.8% vs 14.0%, P = 0.0182; 37.3% vs 10.4%, P < 0.0001; and 38.5% vs 9.5%, P = 0.0017, respectively). The frequency of MSI was significantly higher in MUC6-positive tumors, CD10-negative tumors and G-phenotype tumors than in MUC6-negative tumors, CD10-positive tumors and I-phenotype tumors (24.8% vs 6.7%, P = 0.0009; 22.2% vs 8.0%, P = 0.0143; and 28.6% vs 9.6%, P = 0.0353, respectively).

Conclusion: The tumor differentiation phenotype is closely related to tumor invasion and genetic alterations in gastric differentiated-type tumors.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4087925PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3748/wjg.v12.i24.3803DOI Listing
June 2006

Gastric and intestinal phenotypic cell marker expressions in gastric differentiated-type carcinomas: association with E-cadherin expression and chromosomal changes.

J Cancer Res Clin Oncol 2006 Jun 31;132(6):363-75. Epub 2006 Jan 31.

Department of Surgery, Division of General and Gastroenterological Surgery, Showa University, School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Gastric and intestinal phenotypic cell markers are widely expressed in gastric carcinomas, irrespective of their histological type. In the present study, the relations between the phenotypic marker expression of the tumour, histological findings, expression of cell adhesion molecules, and the chromosomal changes in gastric differentiated-type carcinomas were examined. The phenotypic marker expression of the tumour was determined by the combination of the expression of the human gastric mucin (HGM), MUC6, MUC2 and CD10, and was evaluated in comparison with the expression of cell adhesion molecules, such as E-cadherin and beta-catenin, and chromosomal changes by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) in 34 gastric differentiated-type carcinomas. Tumours were classified into the gastric- (G-), gastric and intestinal mixed- (GI-), intestinal- (I-), or unclassified- (UC-) phenotype according to the immunopositivity of staining for HGM, MUC6, MUC2, and CD10. G-phenotype tumours were significantly associated with a higher incidence of differentiated-type tumours mixed with undifferentiated-type component, compared with GI- and I-phenotype tumours (88.9 vs 33.3%, P=0.0498 and 88.9 vs 42.9%, P=0.0397; respectively). HGM-positive tumours were significantly associated with a higher incidence of tumours with abnormal expression of E-cadherin, compared with HGM-negative tumours (66.7 vs 21.1%, P=0.0135). GI-phenotype tumours were significantly associated with a higher incidence of tumours with abnormal expression of E-cadherin, compared with I-phenotype tumours (77.8 vs 21.4%, P=0.0131). HGM-negative tumours were significantly associated with higher frequencies of the gains of 19q13.2 and 19q13.3, compared with HGM-positive tumours (57.9 vs 20.0%, P=0.0382 and 63.2 vs 13.3%, P=0.0051; respectively). MUC6-positive tumours were significantly associated with higher frequencies of the gains of 20q13.2, compared with MUC6-negative tumours (71.4 vs 30.0%, P=0.0349). MUC2-positive tumours were significantly associated with the gain of 19p13.3, compared with MUC2-negative tumours (41.2 vs 5.9%, P=0.0391). I-phenotype tumours were significantly associated with higher frequencies of gains of 5p15.2 and 13q33-34, compared with G-phenotype tumours (66.7 vs 0%, P=0.0481, each) and also associated with higher frequencies of gain of 7p21, compared with GI-phenotype tumours (66.7 vs 0%, P=0.0481). Our present results show that gastric differentiated-type carcinomas have different characteristics according to the phenotypic marker expression of the tumour in terms of histological findings, E-cadherin expression and pattern of chromosomal changes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00432-005-0062-8DOI Listing
June 2006

A pancreatic abscess 7 years after a pancreatojejunostomy for calcifying chronic pancreatitis.

J Gastroenterol 2002 ;37(12):1062-7

Department of Internal Medicine, Doto Hospital, A Not-For-Profit Medical Foundation, N17, E14, Higashi-ku, Sapporo 065-8555, Japan.

We present herein a case of a 75-year-old Japanese man who had developed a pancreatic abscess 7 years after a longitudinal pancreatojejunostomy for chronic pancreatitis. The patient, a heavy drinker of alcohol, underwent surgical decompression of a ductal obstruction to relieve persistent abdominal pain due to severely calcifying chronic pancreatitis. After the surgery, he stopped drinking alcohol and was treated with insulin to control secondary diabetes mellitus. Thereafter, his symptoms disappeared. Seven years after the surgery, however, he was hospitalized due to obstructive jaundice, high-grade fever, and right hypochondria pain. Ultrasound and computed tomographic scans of the abdomen both disclosed a cystic mass, approximately 6 cm in size, in the pancreatic head. Magnetic resonance imaging strongly suggested a pancreatic abscess with necrotic fluid and debris. First, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage (PTCD) was done to treat the progressively obstructive jaundice. Subsequently, fine-needle aspiration of the pancreatic abscess was performed under ultrasound guidance. Enterococcus avium and Klebsiella oxytoca were revealed by culture of abscess aspirates. He was successfully cured by treatment with both appropriate antibiotic and continuous PTCD for the obstructive jaundice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s005350200179DOI Listing
April 2003
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