Publications by authors named "Sherri Mudri"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

ICOSL plasmacytoid dendritic cells as inducer of graft-versus-host disease, responsive to a dual ICOS/CD28 antagonist.

Sci Transl Med 2020 10;12(564)

Department of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA.

Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) remains a major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). CD146 and CCR5 are proteins that mark activated T helper 17 (Th17) cells. The Th17 cell phenotype is promoted by the interaction of the receptor ICOS on T cells with ICOS ligand (ICOSL) on dendritic cells (DCs). We performed multiparametric flow cytometry in a cohort of 156 HCT recipients and conducted experiments with aGVHD murine models to understand the role of ICOSL DCs. We observed an increased frequency of ICOSL plasmacytoid DCs, correlating with CD146CCR5 T cell frequencies, in the 64 HCT recipients with gastrointestinal aGVHD. In murine models, donor bone marrow cells from ICOSL-deficient mice compared to those from wild-type mice reduced aGVHD-related mortality. Reduced aGVHD resulted from lower intestinal infiltration of pDCs and pathogenic Th17 cells. We transplanted activated human ICOSL pDCs along with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells into immunocompromised mice and observed infiltration of intestinal CD146CCR5 T cells. We found that prophylactic administration of a dual human ICOS/CD28 antagonist (ALPN-101) prevented aGVHD in this model better than did the clinically approved belatacept (CTLA-4-Fc), which binds CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2) and interferes with the CD28 T cell costimulatory pathway. When started at onset of aGVHD signs, ALPN-101 treatment alleviated symptoms of ongoing aGVHD and improved survival while preserving antitumoral cytotoxicity. Our data identified ICOSL-pDCs as an aGVHD biomarker and suggest that coinhibition of the ICOSL/ICOS and B7/CD28 axes with one biologic drug may represent a therapeutic opportunity to prevent or treat aGVHD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/scitranslmed.aay4799DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7811191PMC
October 2020

IL-31 receptor (IL-31RA) knockout mice exhibit elevated responsiveness to oncostatin M.

J Immunol 2010 Nov 18;185(10):6023-30. Epub 2010 Oct 18.

Department of Immunology, ZymoGenetics Inc., Seattle, WA 98102, USA.

IL-31 signals through the heterodimeric receptor IL-31RA and oncostatin M receptor (OSMR), and has been linked with the development of atopic dermatitis, a Th2 cytokine-associated disease in humans. However, recent studies of IL-31RA knockout (KO) mice have suggested that IL-31 signaling may be required to negatively regulate Th2 type responses rather than exacerbate them. Because those studies were performed on genetically modified mice, we examined whether neutralizing IL-31 with a specific mAb would give similar results to IL-31RA KO mice in two Th2 cytokine-associated immune models. We report no difference in lymphocyte Th2-type cytokine production after Ag immunization between IL-31RA KO mice, mice treated with the IL-31 mAb, or control animals. Second, we tested whether the absence of the IL-31RA subunit in IL-31RA KO mice may allow for increased pairing of the OSMR subunit with another cytokine receptor, gp130, resulting in overrepresentation of the heterodimeric receptor for OSM and increased responsiveness to OSM protein. We found that intranasal OSM challenge of IL-31RA KO mice resulted in increased IL-6 and vascular endothelial growth factor production in the lung compared with wild-type littermate control animals. Moreover, PBS-challenged IL-31RA KO mice already had increased levels of vascular endothelial growth factor, which were further increased by OSM challenge. These data imply that IL-31RA-deficient mice produce increased levels of OSM-inducible cytokines during airway sensitization and challenge, which may be the driving force behind the apparent exacerbation of Th2-type inflammatory responses previously observed in these mice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.0902769DOI Listing
November 2010

Interleukin 31, a cytokine produced by activated T cells, induces dermatitis in mice.

Nat Immunol 2004 Jul 6;5(7):752-60. Epub 2004 Jun 6.

Department of Immunology, ZymoGenetics, 1201 Eastlake Avenue East, Seattle, Washington 98102, USA.

T cell-derived cytokines are important in the development of an effective immune response, but when dysregulated they can promote disease. Here we identify a four-helix bundle cytokine we have called interleukin 31 (IL-31), which is preferentially produced by T helper type 2 cells. IL-31 signals through a receptor composed of IL-31 receptor A and oncostatin M receptor. Expression of IL-31 receptor A and oncostatin M receptor mRNA was induced in activated monocytes, whereas epithelial cells expressed both mRNAs constitutively. Transgenic mice overexpressing IL-31 developed severe pruritus, alopecia and skin lesions. Furthermore, IL-31 receptor expression was increased in diseased tissues derived from an animal model of airway hypersensitivity. These data indicate that IL-31 may be involved in promoting the dermatitis and epithelial responses that characterize allergic and non-allergic diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ni1084DOI Listing
July 2004