Publications by authors named "Sherif M Negm"

3 Publications

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Predicting cesarean delivery for failure to progress as an outcome of labor induction in term singleton pregnancy.

Am J Obstet Gynecol 2021 Jan 4. Epub 2021 Jan 4.

Fetal Medicine Research Institute, King's College Hospital, London, United Kingdom.

Background: Induction of labor is one of the most common interventions in modern obstetrics, and its frequency is expected to continue to increase. There is inconsistency as to how failed induction of labor is defined; however, the majority of studies define success as the achievement of vaginal delivery. Induction of labor in nulliparous women poses an additional challenge with a 15% to 20% incidence of failure, ending in emergency operative deliveries. The Bishop score has been traditionally used before decisions for induction of labor. Nonetheless, it is subjective and prone to marked interobserver variation. Several studies have been conducted to find alternative predictors, yet a reliable, objective method still remains to be introduced and validated. Hence, there is still a need for the development of new predictive tools to facilitate informed decision making, optimization of resources, and minimization of potential risks of failure. Furthermore, a peripartum transperineal ultrasound scan has been proven to provide objective, noninvasive assessment of labor.

Objective: This study aimed to assess the feasibility of developing and validating an objective and reproducible model for the prediction of cesarean delivery for failure to progress as an outcome of labor induction in term singleton pregnancies.

Study Design: This was a prospective observational cohort study conducted in Cairo University Hospitals and University of Bologna Hospitals between November 2018 and November 2019. We recruited 382 primigravidae with singleton term pregnancies in cephalic presentation. All patients had baseline Bishop scoring together with various transabdominal and transperineal ultrasound assessments of the fetus, maternal cervix, and pelvic floor. The managing obstetricians were blinded to the ultrasound scan findings. The method and indication of induction of labor, the total duration of stages of labor, mode of birth, and neonatal outcomes were all recorded. Women who had operative delivery for fetal distress or indications other than failure to progress in labor were excluded from the final analysis, leaving a total of 344 participants who were randomly divided into 243 and 101 pregnancies that constituted the model development and cross-validation groups, respectively.

Results: It was possible to perform transabdominal and transperineal scans and assess all the required parameters on all study participants. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used for selection of potential predictors and model fitting. The independent predictive variables for cesarean delivery included maternal age (odds ratio, 1.12; P=.003), cervical length (odds ratio, 1.08; P=.04), angle of progression at rest (odds ratio, 0.9; P=.001), and occiput posterior position (odds ratio, 5.7; P=.006). We tested the performance of the prediction model on our cross-validation group. The calculated areas under the curve for the ability of the model to predict cesarean delivery were 0.7969 (95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.87) and 0.88 (95% confidence interval, 0.79-0.97) for the developed and validated models, respectively.

Conclusion: Maternal age and sonographic fetal occiput position, angle of progression at rest, and cervical length before labor induction are very good predictors of induction outcome in nulliparous women at term.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2020.12.1212DOI Listing
January 2021

The value of three-dimensional ultrasound in identifying Mullerian anomalies at risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes.

J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2020 Sep 1:1-8. Epub 2020 Sep 1.

Fetal Medicine Research Institute, King's College London, London, UK.

Objective: To examine the reliability of three-dimensional ultrasound (3 D-US) in the differentiation between subseptate and arcuate uteri, due to the different associated pregnancy outcomes; refine the existing 3 D-US parameters and evaluate the concordance between 3 D-US and MRI in diagnosing these anomalies.

Study Design: This was a prospective cohort study of 455 women suspected of having a Mullerian anomaly. The diagnosis of subseptate, bicornuate or arcuate uterus was made by 3 D-US in 55 women. Two independent examiners manipulated the 3 D-US volume datasets and recorded the internal intercornual distance, indentation length, indentation tip angle, and myometrial wall thickness in the coronal plane of the uterus. Subsequently, 48 women underwent MRI which was used as the reference test for diagnosis. We calculated the degree of correlation between the two ultrasound assessors' 3 D-US measurements using interclass correlation coefficient and as well as a Bland-Altman plot. The mean values of the four parameters were used to create receiver operating characteristic curves for determining the best cutoff values for differentiation between subseptate and arcuate uterui. We used the Cohen's Kappa test to measure the level of agreement between 3 D-US and MRI.

Results: There was good interobserver agreement between the two 3 D-US assessors for all four parameters. There was a substantial level of agreement between 3 D-US and MRI in differentiating between bicornuate, subseptate and arcuate uteri with a kappa value of 0.727 (95% CI 0.443-0.856). Distinction between subseptate and arcuate uterus was improved when using an indentation length ≥12.5 mm (AUC 0.99) and indentation tip angle ≤89.25 degrees (AUC 0.97) as cutoffs for diagnosis but not the internal intercornual distance or myometrial wall thickness.

Conclusion: 3 D-US evaluation of the coronal view of the uterus can be relied upon to make a noninvasive, accurate differentiation between subseptate and arcuate uteri. The fundal indentation length and indentation tip angle cut offs of ≥12.5 mm and ≤88 mm, respectively were found to be most accurate for distinction. Thus, allowing for individualizing pre-pregnancy management plans and patient-informed healthcare choices. Highlights There are no agreed upon criteria for differentiating arcuate from subseptate uteri. Such differentiation is critical for counseling and management due to the substantial difference in pregnancy outcome. We aimed to propose cut off values for ultrasound measurements standardized against MRI diagnostic criteria for accurate differentiation between arcuate and subseptate uteri. We demonstrated substantial agreement between 3D-US and MRI in differentiating between bicornuate, subseptate and arcuate uteri. 3D-US evaluation of the coronal view of the uterus is reliable to make an accurate differentiation between subseptate and arcuate uteri. Using the indentation length ≥12.5 mm and indentation tip angle ≤89.25 degrees as parameters to be measured on the coronal view by 3D-US increases its diagnostic accuracy for distinction between arcuate and subseptate uteri.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14767058.2020.1815189DOI Listing
September 2020

Three-dimensional sonohysterography compared with vaginoscopic hysteroscopy for evaluation of the uterine cavity in patients with recurrent implantation failure in in vitro fertilization cycles.

J Minim Invasive Gynecol 2012 Jul-Aug;19(4):503-8

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Hayat Fertility and Women's Health Center, Maadi, Cairo, Egypt.

Study Objective: To estimate the degree of agreement between 3-dimensional sonohysterography (3D-SHG) and vaginoscopic hysteroscopy (VH) in detection of uterine cavity abnormalities in patients with recurrent implantation failure in in vitro fertilization cycles.

Design: Comparative observational cross-sectional study (Canadian Task Force classification II-1).

Setting: Private assisted-conception unit.

Patients: One hundred forty-three patients with a history of at least 2 previous implantation failures despite transfer of good quality embryos in assisted-conception cycles.

Interventions: 3D-SHG was followed by VH. The Cohen κ for interrater agreement was calculated for the level of agreement between the 2 diagnostic procedures. Procedure time in seconds was recorded for both procedures. Patients were asked to rate their degree of discomfort or pain during both procedures using a visual analog scale.

Measurements And Main Results: There was a substantial degree of concordance between 3D-SHG and VH (κ = 0.77; 95% confidence interval, 0.6-0.84). The median procedure time for 3D-SHG was 296 seconds (range, 231-327 seconds), and for VH was 315 seconds (range, 232-361 seconds), and the difference was statistically significant (p =.02). The visual analog scale pain scores also showed that 3D-SHG, with a median pain score of 2.1 (range, 1-3) was better tolerated than VH, with a median pain score of 2.9 (range, 2-4) (p < .001).

Conclusion: Our results show that there is a substantial degree of concordance between 3D-SHG and VH in diagnosing uterine cavity anomalies. We also found that 3D-SHG took significantly less time and induced less patient discomfort than did VH. We recommend that 3D-SHG should be the method of first choice for outpatient evaluation of the uterine cavity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmig.2012.03.021DOI Listing
December 2012