Dr. Shengwen Calvin Li, PhD (Mount Sinai School of Medicine) - University of California Irvine - PI, Scientist

Dr. Shengwen Calvin Li

PhD (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)

University of California Irvine

PI, Scientist

Orange, CA | United States

Main Specialties: Allergy & Immunology, Biochemical Genetics, Biology, Biotechnology, Child Neurology, Cytopathology, Hematology & Oncology, Medical Genetics, Molecular Genetic Pathology, Oncology, Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Pediatrics

Additional Specialties: Cancer

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-9699-9204

Dr. Shengwen Calvin Li, PhD (Mount Sinai School of Medicine) - University of California Irvine - PI, Scientist

Dr. Shengwen Calvin Li

PhD (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)

Introduction

2018- Elected overseas fellow, The Royal Society of Medicine (UK). PhD - Mount Sinai School of Medicine; Postdoctoral fellowship: Whitehead Institute/MIT; Research Fellowship: Harvard University Medical School. Have 154+ publications including research articles, reviews, abstracts, book chapters, books, and the USPTO patents. Principal Investigator. Adjunct Professor, teaching at University. Serve on editorial boards: PLOS One (Academic Editor), American Journal of Pathology (ASIP), Current Stem Cell Research & Therapy, World Journal of Stem Cells (Editor-in-Chief), J. Cell Science & Therapy. Ad hoc reviewer for journals and grant agencies Founder, biotechnology companies. Specialties: therapeutic development for diabetes and obesity and cancer immunotherapy, protein-based therapeutic for neurological diseases, pharmacology, marketing support. brain tumor bank, brain tumor stem cell line development and banking, cancer models, 3-D cell culture, organotypic culture, engineered tissue graft model; stem cell therapy, cancer genome; writing and editing grant proposals and manuscripts for publications, project management, journal editor and review board members. SOPs, clinical research regulation.

Principal Investigator - CHOC Children's Hospital of Orange County Research Institute, University of California, Irvine - Present

Primary Affiliation: University of California Irvine - Orange, CA , United States

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Education

Jun 1997
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
Fellowship
Joan S. Brugge, PhD (Mentor)
Aug 1994
Whitehead Institute-MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
postdoc.
Michael P. Lisanti, MD-PhD (Mentor)
Jul 1994
Mount Sinai School of Medicine
PhD
Saul Puszkin, PhD (Mentor)

Experience

Jan 2019
Editor-in-Chief
Editor-in-Chief
World J. Stem Cells (IF: 4.3, 2017, Journal)
Oct 2018
The Royal Society of Medicine, UK
Elected Fellow
Oct 2018
Guest Editor
Guest Editor
Biomolecules (MDPI Inc.)
Sep 2018
Academic Editor
Editorial Board
Public Library of Science (PLOS ONE)
Jul 2012
American Journal of Pathology
Editorial Board member
Editor-in-Chief, Kevin Roth, MD-PhD
Jan 2011 - Jun 2011
University of Southern California
Visiting Scientist
Pathology
Jan 2008 - Jun 2011
Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic
Visiting Scientist
Henry Hirschberg, MD-PhD; Zhongping Chen, PhD
Jun 2010
Sun Yat-sen University
Professor (visiting)
Collaboration (biological control)
Jul 2008
American Journal of Pathology
Editorial Board member
Editor-in-Chief, Michael P. Lisanti, MD-PhD
Jan 2007 - Jun 2007
California State University Fullerton
Adjunct Professor
Department of Biological Sciences (Robert Koch, PhD, Acting Dean, and Chair)
Jan 2006 - Aug 2006
Thomas Jefferson University
Assistant Professor
Cancer, Kimmel Cancer Center (Richard G. Pestell, MD-PhD)
Jan 2006 - May 2006
University of California Irvine School of Medicine
joint faculty/staff
Department of Neurology (John H. Weiss, MD-PhD)

Publications

20Publications

545Reads

307Profile Views

88PubMed Central Citations

Functional endoscopy techniques for tracking stem cell fate.

Quant Imaging Med Surg 2019 Mar;9(3):510-520

Department of Neurology, University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Orange, CA, USA.

Tracking and monitoring implanted stem cells are essential to maximize benefits and to minimize the side effects of stem cell therapy for personalized or "precision" medicine. Previously, we proposed a comprehensive biological Global Positioning System (bGPS) to track and monitor stem cells . Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), bioluminescent imaging, fluorescence imaging, and single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) have been utilized to track labeled or genetically-modified cells in rats and humans. A large amount of research has been dedicated to the design of reporter genes and molecular probes for imaging and the visualization of the biodistribution of the implanted cells in high resolution. On the other hand, optical-based functional imaging, such as photoacoustic imaging (PAI), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and multiphoton microscopy (MPM), has been implemented into small endoscopes to image cells inside the body. The optical fiber allows miniaturization of the imaging probe while maintaining high resolution due to light-based imaging. Upon summarizing the recent progress in the design and application of functional endoscopy techniques for stem cell monitoring, we offer perspectives for the future development of endoscopic molecular imaging tools for tracking of spatiotemporal changes in subclonal evolution at the single cell level.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/qims.2019.02.12DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6462564PMC
March 2019
3.434 Impact Factor

Cancer Subclones Derived from the Patient's Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Tumor Stem Cells for the Screening of Personalized Antitumor Immunotherapy and Chemotherapy.

Stem Cell Res Ther (Walnut) 2018 29;3(1):116-121. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

VA Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA, USA.

Studying on subclonal evolution of cancer stem cells can help illustrate how the immune system recognizes tumor cells, leading to subclonal treatment by immune-based therapies. Here, we discuss that cancer subclones derived from the patient's head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumor stem cells can be used for the screening of personalized antitumor immunotherapy and chemotherapy, to maximize benefits and to minimize the adversary effects, toward personalized or precision medicine. We propose a "wait-and-watch" scheme for monitoring a lifetime cancer stem cell subclonal development evolved with local environments to cancer.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6453126/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6453126/

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6453126PMC
November 2018

Single-cell transcriptomes reveal the mechanism for a breast cancer prognostic gene panel.

Oncotarget 2018 Sep 7;9(70):33290-33301. Epub 2018 Sep 7.

Division of Periodontology, Diagnostic Sciences and Dental Hygiene, and Division of Biomedical Sciences, Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

The clinical benefits of the MammaPrint signature for breast cancer is well documented; however, how these genes are related to cell cycle perturbation have not been well determined. Our single-cell transcriptome mapping (algorithm) provides details into the fine perturbation of all individual genes during a cell cycle, providing a view of the cell-cycle-phase specific landscape of any given human genes. Specifically, we identified that 38 out of the 70 (54%) MammaPrint signature genes are perturbated to a specific phase of the cell cycle. The MammaPrint signature panel derived its clinical prognosis power from measuring the cell cycle activity of specific breast cancer samples. Such cell cycle phase index of the MammaPrint signature suggested that measurement of the cell cycle index from tumors could be developed into a prognosis tool for various types of cancer beyond breast cancer, potentially improving therapy through targeting a specific phase of the cell cycle of cancer cells.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.26044DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6161791PMC
September 2018
18 Reads
6.359 Impact Factor

Relapse pathway of glioblastoma revealed by single-cell molecular analysis.

Carcinogenesis 2018 07;39(7):931-936

Division of Periodontology, Diagnostic Sciences and Dental Hygiene, and Division of Biomedical Sciences, Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains an incurable brain tumor. The highly malignant behavior of GBM may, in part, be attributed to its intraclonal genetic and phenotypic diversity (subclonal evolution). Identifying the molecular pathways driving GBM relapse may provide novel, actionable targets for personalized diagnosis, characterization of prognosis and improvement of precision therapy. We screened single-cell transcriptomes, namely RNA-seq data of primary and relapsed GBM tumors from a patient, to define the molecular profile of relapse. Characterization of hundreds of individual tumor cells identified three mutated genes within single cells, involved in the RAS/GEF GTP-dependent signaling pathway. The identified molecular pathway was further verified by meta-analysis of RNA-seq data from more than 3000 patients. This study showed that single-cell molecular analysis overcomes the inherent heterogeneity of bulk tumors with respect to defining tumor subclonal evolution relevant to GBM relapse.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgy052DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6248540PMC
July 2018
7 Reads
5.600 Impact Factor

The Differentiation Balance of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Is Crucial to Hematopoiesis.

Stem Cells Int 2018 3;2018:1540148. Epub 2018 Apr 3.

Department of Blood Transfusion, Lab of Radiation Biology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Army Medical University, Chongqing 400037, China.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/1540148DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5903338PMC
April 2018
2 Reads
2.810 Impact Factor

Spatiotemporal switching signals for cancer stem cell activation in pediatric origins of adulthood cancer: Towards a watch-and-wait lifetime strategy for cancer treatment.

World J Stem Cells 2018 Feb;10(2):15-22

Children's Hospital of Orange County, Department of Surgery, University of California-Irvine School of Medicine, Orange, CA 92868-3874, United States.

Pediatric origin of cancer stem cell hypothesis holds great promise and potential in adult cancer treatment, however; the road to innovation is full of obstacles as there are plenty of questions left unanswered. First, the key question is to characterize the nature of such stem cells (concept). Second, the quantitative imaging of pediatric stem cells should be implemented (technology). Conceptually, pediatric stem cell origins of adult cancer are based on the notion that plasticity in early life developmental programming evolves local environments to cancer. Technologically, such imaging in children is lacking as all imaging is designed for adult patients. We postulate that the need for quantitative imaging to measure space-time changes of plasticity in early life developmental programming in children may trigger research and development of the imaging technology. Such quantitative imaging of pediatric origin of adulthood cancer will help develop a spatiotemporal monitoring system to determine cancer initiation and progression. Clinical validation of such speculative hypothesis-that cancer originates in a pediatric environment-will help implement a wait-and-watch strategy for cancer treatment.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4252/wjsc.v10.i2.15DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5840533PMC
February 2018
22 Reads
4.270 Impact Factor

Interaction of infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus ORF119L with PINCH leads to dominant-negative inhibition of integrin-linked kinase and cardiovascular defects in zebrafish.

J Virol 2015 Jan 29;89(1):763-75. Epub 2014 Oct 29.

MOE Key Laboratory of Aquatic Product Safety/State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China School of Marine Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China

Unlabelled: Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV) is the type species of the Megalocytivirus genus, Iridoviridae family, causing a severe systemic disease with high mortality in mandarin fish (Siniperca chuatsi) in China and Southeast Asia. At present, the pathogenesis of ISKNV infection is still not fully understood. Based on a genome-wide bioinformatics analysis of ISKNV-encoded proteins, we found that ISKNV open reading frame 119L (ORF119L) is predicted to encode a three-ankyrin-repeat (3ANK)-domain-containing protein, which shows high similarity to the dominant negative form of integrin-linked kinase (ILK); i.e., viral ORF119L lacks the ILK kinase domain. Thus, we speculated that viral ORF119L might affect the host ILK complex. Here, we demonstrated that viral ORF119L directly interacts with particularly interesting Cys-His-rich protein (PINCH) and affects the host ILK-PINCH interaction in vitro in fathead minnow (FHM) cells. In vivo ORF119L overexpression in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos resulted in myocardial dysfunctions with disintegration of the sarcomeric Z disk. Importantly, ORF119L overexpression in zebrafish highly resembles the phenotype of endogenous ILK inhibition, either by overexpressing a dominant negative form of ILK or by injecting an ILK antisense morpholino oligonucleotide. Intriguingly, ISKNV-infected mandarin fish develop disorganized sarcomeric Z disks in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, phosphorylation of AKT, a downstream effector of ILK, was remarkably decreased in ORF119L-overexpressing zebrafish embryos. With these results, we show that ISKNV ORF119L acts as a domain-negative inhibitor of the host ILK, providing a novel mechanism for the megalocytivirus pathogenesis.

Importance: Our work is the first to show the role of a dominant negative inhibitor of the host ILK from ISKNV (an iridovirus). Mechanistically, the viral ORF119L directly binds to the host PINCH, attenuates the host PINCH-ILK interaction, and thus impairs ILK signaling. Intriguingly, ORF119L-overexpressing zebrafish embryos and ISKNV-infected mandarin fish develop similar disordered sarcomeric Z disks in cardiomyocytes. These findings provide a novel mechanism for megalocytivirus pathogenesis.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.01955-14DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4301147PMC
January 2015
32 Reads
6.000 Impact Factor

Training stem cells for treatment of malignant brain tumors.

World J Stem Cells 2014 Sep;6(4):432-40

Shengwen Calvin Li, Mustafa H Kabeer, Long T Vu, Vic Keschrumrus, Brent A Dethlefs, William G Loudon, Neuro-Oncology and Stem Cell Research Laboratory, Center for Neuroscience Research, Children's Hospital of Orange County, University of California-Irvine, Orange, CA 92868, United States.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4252/wjsc.v6.i4.432DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4172671PMC
September 2014
49 Reads
4 Citations

Mandarin fish caveolin 1 interaction with major capsid protein of infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus and its role in early stages of infection.

J Virol 2013 Mar 2;87(6):3027-38. Epub 2013 Jan 2.

School of Marine Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00552-12DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3592132PMC
March 2013
6 Reads
3 Citations
4.440 Impact Factor

Cultivating stem cells for treating amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

World J Stem Cells 2012 Dec;4(12):117-9

Shengwen Calvin Li, William G Loudon, CHOC Children's Hospital, University of California Irvine, Orange, CA 92868, United States.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4252/wjsc.v4.i12.117DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3600561PMC
December 2012
21 Reads

Cancer stem cells from a rare form of glioblastoma multiforme involving the neurogenic ventricular wall.

Cancer Cell Int 2012 Sep 20;12(1):41. Epub 2012 Sep 20.

Neuro-Oncology Research Laboratory, Center for Neuroscience and Stem Cell Research, Children's Hospital of Orange County (CHOC) Research Institute, 455 South Main Street, Orange, CA 92868, USA.

Unlabelled:

Background: The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis posits that deregulated neural stem cells (NSCs) form the basis of brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). GBM, however, usually forms in the cerebral white matter while normal NSCs reside in subventricular and hippocampal regions. We attempted to characterize CSCs from a rare form of glioblastoma multiforme involving the neurogenic ventricular wall.

Methods: We described isolating CSCs from a GBM involving the lateral ventricles and characterized these cells with in vitro molecular biomarker profiling, cellular behavior, ex vivo and in vivo techniques.

Results: The patient's MRI revealed a heterogeneous mass with associated edema, involving the left subventricular zone. Histological examination of the tumor established it as being a high-grade glial neoplasm, characterized by polygonal and fusiform cells with marked nuclear atypia, amphophilic cytoplasm, prominent nucleoli, frequent mitotic figures, irregular zones of necrosis and vascular hyperplasia. Recurrence of the tumor occurred shortly after the surgical resection. CD133-positive cells, isolated from the tumor, expressed stem cell markers including nestin, CD133, Ki67, Sox2, EFNB1, EFNB2, EFNB3, Cav-1, Musashi, Nucleostemin, Notch 2, Notch 4, and Pax6. Biomarkers expressed in differentiated cells included Cathepsin L, Cathepsin B, Mucin18, Mucin24, c-Myc, NSE, and TIMP1. Expression of unique cancer-related transcripts in these CD133-positive cells, such as caveolin-1 and -2, do not appear to have been previously reported in the literature. Ex vivo organotypic brain slice co-culture showed that the CD133+ cells behaved like tumor cells. The CD133-positive cells also induced tumor formation when they were stereotactically transplanted into the brains of the immune-deficient NOD/SCID mice.

Conclusions: This brain tumor involving the neurogenic lateral ventricular wall was comprised of tumor-forming, CD133-positive cancer stem cells, which are likely the driving force for the rapid recurrence of the tumor in the patient.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1475-2867-12-41DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3546918PMC
September 2012
273 Reads
3.400 Impact Factor

Mechanisms for progenitor cell-mediated repair for ischemic heart injury.

Curr Stem Cell Res Ther 2012 Jan;7(1):2-14

CHOC Children's Hospital Research Institute, University of California, Irrine, Orange, 92868, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2012
35 Reads
6 Citations
2.861 Impact Factor

Convergence of normal stem cell and cancer stem cell developmental stage: Implication for differential therapies.

World J Stem Cells 2011 Sep;3(9):83-8

Shengwen Calvin Li, Katherine L Lee, William G Loudon, Neuro-Oncology Research Laboratory, Center for Neuroscience and Stem Cell Research, Children's Hospital of Orange County, University of California Irvine, 455 South Main Street, Orange, CA 92868, United States.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4252/wjsc.v3.i9.83DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3192222PMC
September 2011
6 Reads
2 Citations

Increase developmental plasticity of human keratinocytes with gene suppression.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2011 Aug 18;108(31):12793-8. Epub 2011 Jul 18.

Department of Pathology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1100509108DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3150912PMC
August 2011
4 Reads
11 Citations
9.810 Impact Factor

Therapeutic window, a critical developmental stage for stem cell therapies.

Curr Stem Cell Res Ther 2010 Dec;5(4):297-3

Neuro-Oncology Research Laboratory, Center for Neuroscience and Stem Cell Research, CHOC Children's Hospital, 455 S. Main Street, Orange, CA 92868-3874, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 2010
4 Reads
10 Citations
2.861 Impact Factor

A biological global positioning system: considerations for tracking stem cell behaviors in the whole body.

Stem Cell Rev 2010 Jun;6(2):317-33

Center for Neuroscience and Stem Cell Research, Children's Hospital of Orange County Research Institute, University of California Irvine, 455 South Main Street, Orange, CA 92868, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12015-010-9130-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2887536PMC
June 2010
19 Reads
18 Citations
2.770 Impact Factor

Twisting immune responses for allogeneic stem cell therapy.

World J Stem Cells 2009 Dec;1(1):30-5

Shengwen Calvin Li, CHOC Children's Hospital Research Institute, University of California Irvine, 455 South Main Street, Orange, California, CA 92868, United States.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4252/wjsc.v1.i1.30DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2958105PMC
December 2009
4 Reads
4 Citations

Stem cell engineering for treatment of heart diseases: potentials and challenges.

Cell Biol Int 2009 Mar 3;33(3):255-67. Epub 2008 Dec 3.

Children's Hospital of Orange County Research Institute, CA 92868, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cellbi.2008.11.009DOI Listing
March 2009
36 Reads
14 Citations
1.933 Impact Factor

A novel and generalizable organotypic slice platform to evaluate stem cell potential for targeting pediatric brain tumors.

Cancer Cell Int 2008 May 22;8. Epub 2008 May 22.

Center for Neuroscience and Stem Cell Research, Neuroscience Institute, Children's Hospital of Orange County Research Institute, 455 S, Main Street, Orange, CA 92868, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1475-2867-8-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2474582PMC
May 2008
3 Reads
9 Citations
1.990 Impact Factor

Top co-authors

William G Loudon
William G Loudon

University of California

10
Jiang F Zhong
Jiang F Zhong

University of Southern California

7
Mustafa H Kabeer
Mustafa H Kabeer

Neuro-Oncology and Stem Cell Research Laboratory

4
Hong Zhen Yin
Hong Zhen Yin

Neuro-Oncology and Stem Cell Research Laboratory

3
Brent A Dethlefs
Brent A Dethlefs

Neuro-Oncology and Stem Cell Research Laboratory

3
John H Weiss
John H Weiss

Neuro-Oncology and Stem Cell Research Laboratory

3
Long T Vu
Long T Vu

California State University

2
Jian-Guo He
Jian-Guo He

School of Life Sciences

2
Chang-Jun Guo
Chang-Jun Guo

Sun Yat-sen University

2