Publications by authors named "Shelby L Kubicki"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody positivity and cutaneous IgA vasculitis in a patient with antisynthetase syndrome.

JAAD Case Rep 2021 Dec 20;18:26-28. Epub 2021 Oct 20.

Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdcr.2021.10.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8577075PMC
December 2021

Melatonin-Associated Facial Swelling in an Oncology Patient: Case Report and Review of Swelling of the Face in Individuals With Head and Neck Cancer.

Cureus 2020 Oct 9;12(10):e10866. Epub 2020 Oct 9.

Dermatology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA.

Facial swelling has several etiologies. In patients with head and neck malignancies, this can include primary disease progression or iatrogenic causes. A 66-year-old man presented with increased facial swelling and erythema for 18 months. He had a history of baseline postoperative facial lymphedema following head and neck surgery and radiotherapy for desmoplastic melanoma approximately 20 years ago. However, his facial edema acutely worsened 18 months prior to presentation. A medication review revealed that he was regularly taking melatonin for the past two years. Approximately two weeks after cessation of melatonin therapy, the patient's facial appearance returned to baseline. In conclusion, it is important for clinicians to perform a thorough medication review for patients with facial swelling and erythema.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.10866DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7652014PMC
October 2020

Ketoconazole shampoo-induced hair discoloration.

Int J Womens Dermatol 2020 Mar 14;6(2):121-122. Epub 2019 Nov 14.

Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of Dermatology, Bronx, NY, United States.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijwd.2019.10.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7105667PMC
March 2020

Twelve cases of acneiform eruptions while on anti-CTLA4 therapy.

Support Care Cancer 2020 Jun 9;28(6):2499-2502. Epub 2020 Mar 9.

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, FCT 11.5000, Unit 1452, Houston, TX, 77030-4009, USA.

We present the first detailed report of acneiform eruptions in patients on CTLA-4 inhibitor therapy. Acneiform eruptions commonly occur (up to 75-100%) as a cutaneous adverse event associated with EGFR inhibition; however, acneiform eruptions have not been highly reported as a cutaneous adverse event associated with CTLA-4 inhibitor therapy. We conducted a retrospective chart review of our institution's database to assess cutaneous adverse events associated with ipilimumab and tremelimumab, identifying 12 patients with acneiform eruptions (2 on tremelimumab and 10 on ipilimumab). The median time to onset of rash was 3 weeks after starting CTLA-4 inhibitor therapy, ranging from 0.7-45 weeks. Median time to cutaneous resolution was 6 weeks, ranging from 2 to 282 weeks. Treatment included oral and topical antibiotics, antihistamines, and oral or topical corticosteroids with four patients receiving no treatment. Acneiform eruptions are seen less commonly with CTLA-4 inhibitors than other cancer therapies, but awareness that it does occur is important for clinical practice. Better description is a necessary help to aid in early diagnosis and intervention. While EGFR inhibitor-associated acneiform eruptions are associated with clinical benefit, our sample size is too small to determine whether CTLA-4 inhibitor associated acneiform eruptions display the same correlation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-020-05381-5DOI Listing
June 2020

Laser Therapy of Traumatic and Surgical Scars and an Algorithm for Their Treatment.

Lasers Surg Med 2020 02 17;52(2):125-136. Epub 2019 Oct 17.

Department of Dermatology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, McGovern Medical School, 6655 Travis St. #700, Houston, Texas, 77030.

Background And Objectives: This paper describes the laser techniques available for the treatment of surgical and trauma scars and develops recommendations for an algorithmic-based treatment approach based on extensive clinical experience and published data.

Study Design/materials And Methods: We reviewed the literature regarding laser treatment of surgical and traumatic scars and incorporated the clinical experience of the authors to develop an algorithm for the treatment of surgical and trauma scars.

Results: In order to develop treatment recommendations, scars were differentiated based on their clinical characteristics. Specific scar characteristics aid in determining the appropriate treatment strategy for different types of complex surgical and trauma scars.

Conclusion: Laser therapy is first-line therapy for traumatic and surgical scars. The treatment approach should be guided by scar characteristics (e.g., anatomic location, type of injury, color, thickness, tension, scar age, and activity) and involves choosing the appropriate laser type and determining the benefit of combination therapy with surgical and nonsurgical treatment modalities to optimize treatment responses. Lasers Surg. Med. © 2019 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/lsm.23171DOI Listing
February 2020

Complete Resolution of Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma With Topical Imiquimod

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 May;18(5):460-462

Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (pc-ALCL) is a CD30+ subtype of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. It typically has a very favorable prognosis; however, traditional treatment can be expensive, invasive, and associated with significant adverse events. Imiquimod is a topical toll-like receptor approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for genital warts, actinic keratosis, and primary superficial basal cell carcinoma. In previous case reports, imiquimod has been shown to be effective against pc-ALCL. We present a case of complete resolution of pc-ALCL within 8 weeks with topical imiquimod and review the current literature. J Drugs Dermatol. 2019;18(5):460-462.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 2019

Retrospective Chart Review of Cutaneous Adverse Events Associated with Tremelimumab in 17 Patients.

Am J Clin Dermatol 2018 Dec;19(6):899-905

University of Texas McGovern Medical School, Houston, TX, USA.

Background And Objectives: Tremelimumab is a monoclonal human antibody that inhibits cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4, giving rise to increased T cell activation and interleukin-2 release. While this activation of the immune system provides a mechanism to recognize and destroy cancer cells, it also leads to off-target immune-related adverse events. Ipilimumab is a US Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 antibody, which has a high incidence of cutaneous adverse events. While cutaneous adverse events for ipilimumab have been extensively studied, there is a distinct lack of cutaneous adverse event data for tremelimumab.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of our institution's electronic medical records from January 2000 to March 2018 to characterize cutaneous adverse events induced by tremelimumab. Previous descriptions of tremelimumab cutaneous adverse events are limited to rash and pruritus.

Results: We found 17 patients treated with tremelimumab who had cutaneous adverse events including pruritus (12/17), eczematous dermatitis (8/17), morbilliform rash (5/17), vitiligo (2/17), xerosis (3/17), acneiform rash (2/17), and psoriasiform dermatitis (1/17).

Conclusions: This case series demonstrates that cutaneous adverse events seen in patients taking tremelimumab overlap with those of ipilimumab. While there are some differences between rash characterizations of the two drugs, such as time to onset and clearance, the sample size of this case series is too small to draw any definite conclusions. This study addresses a gap in the descriptive knowledge on tremelimumab cutaneous adverse events and highlights the need for further large cohort prospective studies. Awareness of expected cutaneous toxicities and how best to treat these can help patients continue on immunotherapy regimens without delays or interruptions and give patients the best quality of life while receiving treatment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40257-018-0376-3DOI Listing
December 2018

Granulomatous dermatitis associated with ipilimumab therapy (ipilimumab associated granulomatous dermatitis).

J Cutan Pathol 2018 Aug 29;45(8):636-638. Epub 2018 May 29.

Department of Dermatology, McGovern Medical School at UTHealth at Houston, Houston, Texas.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cup.13267DOI Listing
August 2018

The acetabular fossa hot spot on 18F-FDG PET/CT: epidemiology, natural history, and proposed etiology.

Skeletal Radiol 2015 Jan 7;44(1):107-14. Epub 2014 Oct 7.

Trinity University, San Antonio, TX, USA,

Objective: To describe a benign focus of increased activity in the acetabular fossa (the acetabular fossa hot spot, AFHS) on (18) F-FDG PET/CT that can mimic a neoplasm.

Materials And Methods: (18)F-FDG PET/CT images from four patient populations were examined. Group 1 (n = 13) was collected from a search of radiology reports and used to define the AFHS and for hypothesis generation. Group 2 (n = 1,150) was used for prevalence of AFHS. Group 3 (n = 1,213) had PET/CT and MRI pelvis within a week of each other and was used to correlate metabolic and anatomic findings. Group 4 (n = 100) was used to generate the control group. Data were collected on demographics, common comorbidities, underlying cancer diagnosis and status, and hip symptoms.

Results: Prevalence of AFHS was 0.36 % (95 % CI 0.10-0.91 %). None progressed to malignancy or was associated with cancer status. The majority (71 %) were on the left, and 6 % were bilateral. Mean SUVmax of the AFHS was 4.8 (range, 2.7-7.8). Male patients were more likely to have the AFHS (OR = 8.69, 95 % CI 1.88-40.13). There was no difference with respect to other collected data, including hip symptoms. Average minimum duration of AFHS was 346 days (range, 50-1,010 days). Readers did not detect corresponding hip abnormalities on MRIs.

Conclusions: AFHS is a benign finding that may be caused by subclinical ligamentum teres injury, focal synovitis, or degeneration of acetabular fossa fat. Despite uncertainty regarding its etiology, recognition of AFHS as a benign finding can prevent morbidity associated with unnecessary biopsy or initiation of therapy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00256-014-2011-6DOI Listing
January 2015
-->