Publications by authors named "Sheila J Gross"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Efficacy of a proprietary formulation of fipronil/(S)-methoprene/cyphenothrin against Ixodes scapularis tick infestations on dogs.

Parasit Vectors 2015 Jul 17;8:379. Epub 2015 Jul 17.

Merial, Inc., 3239 Satellite Blvd, Duluth, GA, 30096, USA.

Background: Efficacy of FRONTLINE TRITAK For Dogs (fipronil/(S)-methoprene/cyphenothrin, Merial, Inc., Duluth, GA) against Ixodes scapularis was evaluated in two separate, but concurrent laboratory studies.

Methods: One day after topical treatment with placebo or active, dogs (n = 24) were infested with 50 unfed adult Ixodes scapularis ticks, with repeat infestations on Days 7, 14, 21 and 28. The number of live ticks was counted at 6 hours post-infestation in the first study (n = 12) and at 24 hours post-infestation in the second study (n = 12).

Results: Observed efficacies in study 1 were 93-99% at 6 hour assessments on Day 1 through Day 28 and in the second study, 98-100% at 24 hour assessments, occurring on Day 2 through Day 29.

Conclusions: A single dose of FRONTLINE TRITAK For Dogs (fipronil/(S)-methoprene/cyphenothrin) (0.67 ml or 1.34 ml) prevented the establishment of a new infestation following treatment, as well as the repeated weekly re-infestations with Ixodes scapularis ticks, for 4 weeks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13071-015-0992-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4504346PMC
July 2015

Efficacy of a barrier gel for reducing the development of plaque, calculus, and gingivitis in cats.

J Vet Dent 2012 ;29(2):89-94

All Pets Dental, Weston, FL 33326, USA.

This study was performed to assess the field efficacy of a professional and home-care barrier gel against the development of plaque, calculus, gingival bleeding, and gingivitis in client-owned cats over a 56-day period compared with negative controls. In a randomized, negative-controlled, outcome evaluator-blinded, client-owned animal clinical field study, 31 cats were evaluated to assess if the barrier gel dental product was effective in cats. Following an enrollment-qualification assessment and enrollment of each cat, all cats received a professional dental cleaning, including polishing and irrigation. Following cleaning, a post-cleaning assessment was performed by the evaluator. Then, using a pre-developed randomization schedule, cats were assigned to the treated or control group. The professional version of the barrier gel was applied to the treated group on day 0. The negative-control group patients did not receive any applications of the barrier gel following dental cleaning. Treated-group cats were brought back to the clinic for subsequent applications of the home-care version of the barrier gel, applied by a non-blinded trained assistant. The home-care version product applications began on day 14 and then were applied weekly (days, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49 and 56) through day 56. All cats enrolled in the study underwent full oral examinations and assessments by the blinded evaluator on or about their respective days 28 and 56. At these evaluations, the evaluator performed standardized assessments for plaque, calculus, gingivitis, and gingival bleeding. Numeric scores were assigned for each assessment using predetermined target teeth to ensure consistency. Using these assessment scores, statistical analyses were performed to determine the efficacies against plaque and calculus deposition; additionally, measurements of gingivitis and gingival bleeding were assessed. Change in plaque score from baseline, for all teeth assessed (all 4 canine teeth, and all 4 [corrected] premolar teeth), was significantly (P < 0.05) lower for treated cats than for control cats for both left side average and right side average on day 56. No statistical differences were seen for calculus, gingivitis, or gingival bleeding in this study. In cats with a history of developing plaque, application of the barrier gel dental product following dental cleaning reduced plaque deposition (P < 0.05) compared with control cats.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/089875641202900204DOI Listing
October 2012

Efficacy and safety of firocoxib for the treatment of pain associated with soft tissue surgery in dogs under field conditions in Japan.

J Vet Med Sci 2012 Oct 31;74(10):1283-9. Epub 2012 May 31.

Merial Japan, Tokyo Opera City Tower, 3-20-2 Nishi Shinjuku, Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan.

Use of firocoxib in dogs for postoperative pain control has not been published in any of the journals in Japan. A field study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of firocoxib in dogs in controlling pain associated with soft tissue surgery in Japan. The study followed a negative control, double-blind, multicenter clinical efficacy study using a randomized block design. A total of 131 client-owned dogs presented to the clinical practices for soft tissue surgery were enrolled. Sixty-nine dogs were allocated to the firocoxib-treated group and received 5 mg/kg of firocoxib orally on Day 0 before the surgery and once daily through Day 2, while 62 dogs were allocated to the non-treated group handled in a similar manner only without the firocoxib administration. Pain assessment took place on Day 0 before the surgery through Day 2. The primary efficacy variable was a success/failure variable based on whether the dog needed rescue medication (based on pain assessment after the surgery or Investigator's judgment) and a significant difference between firocoxib-treated group (16.4%) and non-treated group (50.0%) (P=0.0031) was observed. There was no adverse event during the study that was considered to be related to the administration of firocoxib. This study indicated the clinical efficacy and safety profile of firocoxib administered to control pain associated with soft tissue surgery under field condition.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1292/jvms.11-0306DOI Listing
October 2012

Gastric ulcer development in horses in a simulated show or training environment.

J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005 Sep;227(5):775-7

Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA.

Objective: To determine whether conditions representing activities that are typical in the recreational use of horses, including transport to and from show grounds, stall confinement in unfamiliar surroundings, and light exercise, are associated with increased incidence of gastric ulcers in horses.

Design: Randomized controlled study.

Animals: 20 client-owned horses.

Procedure: Horses had no gastric ulcers as determined by endoscopic examination on study day -1. Ten control horses were maintained on-site with no changes in management variables. Ten horses were transported via trailer for 4 hours on day 0 to another site, placed in individual stalls, fed twice daily, and exercised twice daily for 3 days. On day 4, they were transported back to the original site via trailer for 4 hours. On day 5, endoscopic examinations were performed on all horses to assess gastric mucosa status.

Results: Horses that were transported and housed off-site had a significantly higher incidence of hyperkeratosis and reddening of the gastric mucosa than control horses. Two control horses and 7 transported horses developed gastric ulcers by day 5. Ulcer scores of transported horses increased significantly from day -1, whereas ulcer scores in control horses did not change significantly from day -1.

Conclusions And Clinical Relevance: Activities that are typical in recreational use of horses were ulcerogenic, and ulcers in the gastric squamous mucosa can develop under these conditions within 6 days.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2460/javma.2005.227.775DOI Listing
September 2005
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