Publications by authors named "Sheila J Franco"

3 Publications

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2013 NCHS Urban-Rural Classification Scheme for Counties.

Vital Health Stat 2 2014 Apr(166):1-73

Objectives: This report details development of the 2013 National Center for Health Statistics' (NCHS) Urban-Rural Classification Scheme for Counties (update of the 2006 NCHS scheme) and applies it to health measures to demonstrate urban-rural health differences.

Methods: The methodology used to construct the 2013 NCHS scheme was the same as that used for the 2006 NCHS scheme, but 2010 census-based data were used rather than 2000 census-based data. All U.S. counties and county-equivalent entities are assigned to one of six levels (four metropolitan and two nonmetropolitan) based on: 1) their February 2013 Office of Management and Budget designation as metropolitan, micropolitan, or noncore; 2) for metropolitan counties, the population size of the metropolitan statistical area (MSA) to which they belong; and 3) for counties in MSAs of 1 million or more, the location of principal city populations within the MSA. The 2013 and 2006 NCHS schemes were applied to data from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) and National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) to illustrate differences in selected health measures by urbanization level and to assess the magnitude of differences between estimates from the two schemes.

Results And Conclusions: County urban-rural assignments under the 2013 NCHS scheme are very similar to those under the 2006 NCHS scheme. Application of the updated scheme to NVSS and NHIS data demonstrated the continued usefulness of the six categories for assessing and monitoring health differences among communities across the full urbanization spectrum. Residents of large central and large fringe metro counties differed substantially on many health measures, illustrating the importance of continuing to separate these counties. Residents of large fringe metro counties generally fared better than residents of less urban counties. Estimates obtained from the 2013 and 2006 schemes were similar.
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April 2014

NCHS urban-rural classification scheme for counties.

Vital Health Stat 2 2012 Jan(154):1-65

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Office of Analysis and Epidemiology, Hyattsville, Maryland 20782, USA.

Objectives: This report details the National Center for Health Statistics' (NCHS) development of the 2006 NCHS Urban-Rural Classification Scheme for Counties and provides some examples of how the scheme can be used to describe differences in health measures by urbanization level.

Methods: The 2006 NCHS urban-rural classification scheme classifies all U.S. counties and county-equivalents into six levels--four for metropolitan counties and two for nonmetropolitan counties. The Office of Management and Budget's delineation of metropolitan and nonmetropolitan counties forms the foundation of the scheme. The NCHS scheme also uses the cut points of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural-Urban Continuum Codes to subdivide the metropolitan counties based on the population of their metropolitan statistical area (MSA): large, for MSA population of 1 million or more; medium, for MSA population of 250,000-999,999; and small, for MSA population below 250,000. Large metro counties were further separated into large central and large fringe metro categories using classification rules developed by NCHS. Nonmetropolitan counties were assigned to two levels based on the Office of Management and Budget's designated micropolitan or noncore status. The 2006 scheme was applied to data from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) and the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) to illustrate its ability to capture health differences by urbanization level.

Results And Conclusions: Application of the 2006 NCHS scheme to NVSS and NHIS data shows that it identifies important health disparities among communities, most notably those for inner city and suburban communities. The design of the NCHS Urban-Rural Classification Scheme for Counties makes it particularly well-suited for assessing and monitoring health differences across the full urbanization continuum.
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January 2012

Medicare home health care in rural America.

Authors:
Sheila J Franco

Policy Anal Brief W Ser 2004 Jan(1):1-4

The past decade has brought many changes to the home health care industry, largely as a result of Medicare policy changes. These policy reforms include a new payment system, eligibility restrictions, and stringent fraud and abuse enforcement. In addition, Medicare now pays for home health care based on the location of the beneficiary, not the agency. To examine the impact of these changes on access to care, we evaluated the degree to which beneficiaries are served by agencies outside of their county. We constructed an analytical file by linking the 1997 five percent Medicare Standard Analytical File home health claims file to the Provider of Services file to obtain the characteristics of the beneficiaries' primary agency. This beneficiary-level analytical file included information on 162,241 Medicare home health users - including 43,488 rural residents - of 9,410 home health agencies. We examined the characteristics of rural beneficiaries served by urban agencies as compared with those served by rural agencies. Our findings demonstrate that urban agencies - either directly or through their branch offices - play an important role in providing home health care to rural Medicare beneficiaries.
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January 2004