Publications by authors named "Shashikala Sasidharan"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

RhoGAP RGA-8 supports morphogenesis in by polarizing epithelia.

Biol Open 2020 11 26;9(11). Epub 2020 Nov 26.

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Rutgers - RWJMS, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA

CDC-42 regulation of non-muscle myosin/NMY-2 is required for polarity maintenance in the one-cell embryo of CDC-42 and NMY-2 regulate polarity throughout embryogenesis, but their contribution to later events of morphogenesis are less understood. We have shown that epidermal enclosure requires the GTPase CED-10/Rac1 and WAVE/Scar complex, its effector, to promote protrusions that drive enclosure through the branch actin regulator Arp2/3. Our analysis here of RGA-8, a homolog of SH3BP1/Rich1/ARHGAP17/Nadrin, with BAR and RhoGAP motifs, suggests it regulates CDC-42, so that actin and myosin/NMY-2 promote ventral enclosure during embryonic morphogenesis. Genetic and molecular data suggest RGA-8 regulates CDC-42, and phenocopies the CDC-42 pathway regulators WASP-1/WSP-1 and the F-BAR proteins TOCA-1 and TOCA-2. Live imaging shows RGA-8 and WSP-1 enrich myosin and regulate F-actin in migrating epidermal cells during ventral enclosure. Loss of RGA-8 alters membrane recruitment of active CDC-42. We propose TOCA proteins and RGA-8 use BAR domains to localize and regenerate CDC-42 activity, thus regulating F-actin levels, through the branched actin regulator WSP-1, and myosin enrichment. RhoGAP RGA-8 thus polarizes epithelia, to promote cell migrations and cell shape changes of embryonic morphogenesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/bio.056911DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7710025PMC
November 2020

WAVE regulates Cadherin junction assembly and turnover during epithelial polarization.

Dev Biol 2018 02 6;434(1):133-148. Epub 2017 Dec 6.

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Rutgers - Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA. Electronic address:

Actin is an integral component of epithelial apical junctions, yet the interactions of branched actin regulators with apical junction components are still not clear. Biochemical data have shown that α-catenin inhibits Arp2/3-dependent branched actin. These results suggested that branched actin is only needed at earliest stages of apical junction development. We use live imaging in developing C. elegans embryos to test models for how WAVE-induced branched actin collaborates with other apical junction proteins during the essential process of junction formation and maturation. We uncover both early and late essential roles for WAVE in apical junction formation. Early, as the C. elegans intestinal epithelium becomes polarized, we find that WAVE components become enriched concurrently with the Cadherin components and before the DLG-1 apical accumulation. Live imaging of F-actin accumulation in polarizing intestine supports that the Cadherin complex components and branched actin regulators work together for apical actin enrichment. Later in junction development, the apical accumulation of WAVE and Cadherin components is shown to be interdependent: Cadherin complex loss alters WAVE accumulation, and WAVE complex loss increases Cadherin accumulation. To determine why Cadherin levels rise when WVE-1 is depleted, we use FRAP to analyze Cadherin dynamics and find that loss of WAVE as well as of the trafficking protein EHD-1/RME-1 increases Cadherin dynamics. EM studies in adults depleted of branched actin regulators support that WVE-1 maintains established junctions, presumably through its trafficking effect on Cadherin. Thus we propose a developmental model for junction formation where branched actin regulators are tightly interconnected with Cadherin junctions through their previously unappreciated role in Cadherin transport.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ydbio.2017.12.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5812483PMC
February 2018

Fodrin in centrosomes: implication of a role of fodrin in the transport of gamma-tubulin complex in brain.

PLoS One 2013 1;8(10):e76613. Epub 2013 Oct 1.

Cancer Research Programme III, Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Thiruvanantha-puram, Kerala, India.

Gamma-tubulin is the major protein involved in the nucleation of microtubules from centrosomes in eukaryotic cells. It is present in both cytoplasm and centrosome. However, before centrosome maturation prior to mitosis, gamma-tubulin concentration increases dramatically in the centrosome, the mechanism of which is not known. Earlier it was reported that cytoplasmic gamma-tubulin complex isolated from goat brain contains non-erythroid spectrin/fodrin. The major role of erythroid spectrin is to help in the membrane organisation and integrity. However, fodrin or non-erythroid spectrin has a distinct pattern of localisation in brain cells and evidently some special functions over its erythroid counterpart. In this study, we show that fodrin and γ-tubulin are present together in both the cytoplasm and centrosomes in all brain cells except differentiated neurons and astrocytes. Immunoprecipitation studies in purified centrosomes from brain tissue and brain cell lines confirm that fodrin and γ-tubulin interact with each other in centrosomes. Fodrin dissociates from centrosome just after the onset of mitosis, when the concentration of γ-tubulin attains a maximum at centrosomes. Further it is observed that the interaction between fodrin and γ-tubulin in the centrosome is dependent on actin as depolymerisation of microfilaments stops fodrin localization. Image analysis revealed that γ-tubulin concentration also decreased drastically in the centrosome under this condition. This indicates towards a role of fodrin as a regulatory transporter of γ-tubulin to the centrosomes for normal progression of mitosis.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0076613PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3788121PMC
April 2014

Cytoplasmic gamma-tubulin complex from brain contains nonerythroid spectrin.

J Cell Biochem 2010 Aug;110(6):1334-41

Cytoskeleton Research Laboratory, Division of Cancer Research, Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Trivandrum 695014, India.

The newer member of the tubulin superfamily, gamma-tubulin, is known to mediate microtubule nucleation from the centrosome of eukaryotic cells with the aid of some other proteins. The major amount of gamma-tubulin is believed to be located in the centrosome before the onset of mitotic division. However, a considerable amount has been found in the cytoplasm in the form of a complex whose function is not well known. Microtubules are most abundant in brain tissues and brain microtubules have been extensively used in many in vitro studies. Thus, it is relevant to use brain tissue to characterize cytoplasmic gamma-tubulin complex. Here we show that cytoplasmic gamma-tubulin in brain tissues exists as a ring complex as in other tissues. Interestingly, along with the common members of the gamma-TuRC reported from several tissues and species, the purified brain cytoplasmic complex contains some high molecular weight proteins including alpha and beta nonerythroid spectrin which are not found in other tissues. Immunohistochemical studies of brain tissue sections also show the co-localization of gamma-tubulin and spectrin. The possible implications have been discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcb.22647DOI Listing
August 2010
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