Laing Sharon S, PhD - University of Washington Tacoma - Assistant Professor of Nursing and Healthcare Leadership

Laing Sharon S

PhD

University of Washington Tacoma

Assistant Professor of Nursing and Healthcare Leadership

Tacoma, Washington | United States

Laing Sharon S, PhD - University of Washington Tacoma - Assistant Professor of Nursing and Healthcare Leadership

Laing Sharon S

PhD

Introduction

Primary Affiliation: University of Washington Tacoma - Tacoma, Washington , United States

Publications

15Publications

560Reads

414Profile Views

75PubMed Central Citations

Anxiety and Depression Mediate the Relationship Between Perceived Workplace Health Support and Presenteeism: A Cross-sectional Analysis.

J Occup Environ Med 2016 11;58(11):1144-1149

Nursing and Healthcare Leadership Programs, University of Washington Tacoma, and Health Promotion Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle (Dr Laing); and Group Health Research Institute, Seattle (Dr Jones), Washington.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JOM.0000000000000880DOI Listing
November 2016
148 Reads
1.800 Impact Factor

Psychological distress after a positive fecal occult blood test result among members of an integrated healthcare delivery system.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2014 Jan 12;23(1):154-9. Epub 2013 Nov 12.

Authors' Affiliations: Health Promotion Research Center, University of Washington; Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington; Group Health Research Institute, Seattle; and Department of Psychology, Eastern Washington University, Bellevue, Washington.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-0722DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3947142PMC
January 2014
47 Reads
5 Citations
4.125 Impact Factor

Uptake and positive predictive value of fecal occult blood tests: A randomized controlled trial.

Prev Med 2013 Nov 9;57(5):671-8. Epub 2013 Sep 9.

Group Health Research Institute, 1730 Minor Ave, Ste 1600, Seattle, WA 98101, USA; Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Box 357236, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.08.032DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3856243PMC
November 2013
58 Reads
10 Citations
3.090 Impact Factor

Increasing evidence-based workplace health promotion best practices in small and low-wage companies, Mason County, Washington, 2009.

Prev Chronic Dis 2012 5;9:E83. Epub 2012 Apr 5.

Health Promotion Research Center, Department of Health Services, University of Washington, School of Public Health, 1107 NE 45th St, Ste 200, Seattle, WA 98105, USA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3396550PMC
August 2012
63 Reads
15 Citations
1.960 Impact Factor

Nonparticipation in a population-based trial to increase colorectal cancer screening.

Am J Prev Med 2012 Apr;42(4):390-7

Group Health Permanente, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2011.11.014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3549634PMC
April 2012
24 Reads
14 Citations
4.530 Impact Factor

Fall prevention knowledge, attitude, and practices of community stakeholders and older adults.

J Aging Res 2011 7;2011:395357. Epub 2011 Sep 7.

Health Promotion Research Center, Department of Health Services, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/395357DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3170803PMC
November 2011
49 Reads
7 Citations

Evaluating the relationships among psychological distress, executive cognitive function and economic factors on mammography use in unaffected African American women at risk for breast cancer.

Ethn Dis 2010 ;20(4):467-73

Department of Psychology, Howard University, Washington DC, USA.

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March 2011
20 Reads
0.921 Impact Factor

Systems of support to increase colorectal cancer screening and follow-up rates (SOS): design, challenges, and baseline characteristics of trial participants

Cont Clin Trials. 31(6): 589-603

Contemporary Clinical Trials

ABSTRACT Screening decreases colorectal cancer (CRC) morbidity and mortality, yet remains underutilized. Screening breakdowns arise from lack of uptake and failure to follow-up after a positive screening test. Systems of support to increase colorectal cancer screening and follow-up (SOS) is a randomized trial designed to increase: (1) CRC screening and (2) follow-up of positive screening tests. The Chronic Care Model and the Preventive Health Model inform study design. The setting is a large nonprofit healthcare organization. In part-1 study, patients age 50-75 due for CRC screening are randomized to one of 4 study conditions. Arm 1 receives usual care. Arm 2 receives automated support (mailed information about screening choices and fecal occult blood tests (FOBT)). Arm 3 receives automated and assisted support (a medical assistant telephone call). Arm 4 receives automated, assisted, and care management support (a registered nurse provides behavioral activation and coordination of care). In part-2, study patients with a positive FOBT or adenomas on flexible sigmoidoscopy are randomized to receive either usual care or nurse care management. Primary outcomes are: 1) the proportion with CRC screening, 2) the proportion with a complete diagnostic evaluation after a positive screening test. We sent recruitment letters to 15,414 patients and 4675 were randomized. Randomly assigned treatment groups were similar in age, sex, race, education, self-reported health, and CRC screening history. We will determine the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of stepped increases in systems of support to increase CRC screening and follow-up after a positive screening test over 2years.

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November 2010
38 Reads

Predicting regular breast cancer screening in African-American women with a family history of breast cancer.

J Natl Med Assoc 2008 Nov;100(11):1309-17

Department of Psychology, Howard University, Washington, DC, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0027-9684(15)31510-8DOI Listing
November 2008
17 Reads
3 Citations

Startle eyeblink modulation: detecting changes in directed attentional allocation during early preattentive processing.

Int J Psychophysiol 2003 Apr;48(1):43-53

Psychophysiology Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Howard University, 525 Bryant Street, Washington, DC 20059, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0167-8760(03)00003-5DOI Listing
April 2003
18 Reads
2.882 Impact Factor

Startle eyeblink modulation: detecting changes in directed attentional allocation during early preattentive processing

Int J Psychophys, April 2003, vol 8, issue 1, pages 43-53

International Journal of Psychophysiology

Startle eyeblink modification was examined as a measure of allocation of attentional resources during active attention tasks in the early stage of information processing. Fifty-five participants were presented with a series of 250- and 40-ms tones of either high or low pitch which were followed by startle-eliciting stimuli at a lead interval of 120 ms. Attentional allocation was manipulated by instructing one group (Passive) to simply listen to the tones; the second group (Active 1) to count the number of low tones and the third group (Active 2) to count the long high-pitched tones and the short low-pitched tones. Startle eyeblink was significantly more inhibited for the Active 1 group than the Passive group (control) with no significant difference between the two directed attentional conditions (Active 1 and Active 2 groups). However, across the three attentional groups, the degree of startle eyeblink modulation appeared to reflect the degree of attention allocated to the task. The results support the utility of the startle probe in evaluating controlled attentional allocation during the early stages of information processing.

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April 2003
54 Reads

Top co-authors

Sharon S Laing
Sharon S Laing

University of Washington

9
Jessica Chubak
Jessica Chubak

Group Health Research Institute

4
Andy Bogart
Andy Bogart

University of Washington

4
Beverly B Green
Beverly B Green

Group Health Research Institute

4
Jeffrey R Harris
Jeffrey R Harris

University of Alberta

3
Sharon Fuller
Sharon Fuller

Group Health Research Institute

3
Cynthia Ko
Cynthia Ko

University of Washington

2
Richard T Meenan
Richard T Meenan

Center for Health Research

2
Sally W Vernon
Sally W Vernon

School of Public Health

2
Peggy A Hannon
Peggy A Hannon

University of Washington

2

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Following

Malgorzata Maciukiewicz
Malgorzata Maciukiewicz

Centre for Addiction and Mental Health