Publications by authors named "Sharon L Manne"

97 Publications

Financial hardship among cancer survivors in Southern New Jersey.

Support Care Cancer 2021 May 4. Epub 2021 May 4.

Rutgers School of Public Health, Piscataway, NJ, USA.

Purpose: To identify predictors of financial hardship, operationalized as foregoing health care, making financial sacrifices, and being concerned about having inadequate financial and insurance information.

Methods: Cancer survivors (n = 346) identified through the New Jersey State Cancer Registry were surveyed from August 2018 to September 2019. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed.

Results: Cancer survivors with household incomes less than $50,000 annually were more likely than those earning $50,0000-$90,000 to report foregoing health care (15.8 percentage points, p < 0.05). Compared to retirees, survivors who were currently unemployed, disabled, or were homemakers were more likely to forego doctor's visits (11.4 percentage points, p < 0.05), more likely to report borrowing money (16.1 percentage points, p < 0.01), and more likely to report wanting health insurance information (25.7 percentage points, p < 0.01). Employed survivors were more likely than retirees to forego health care (16.8 percentage points, p < 0.05) and make financial sacrifices (20.0 percentage points, p < 0.01). Survivors who never went to college were 9.8 percentage points (p < 0.05) more likely to borrow money compared to college graduates. Black survivors were more likely to want information about dealing with financial and insurance issues (p < 0.01); men were more likely to forego health care (p < 0.05).

Conclusion: Findings highlight the role of employment status and suggest that education, income, race, and gender also shape cancer survivors' experience of financial hardship. There is a need to refine and extend financial navigation programs. For employed survivors, strengthening family leave policies would be desirable.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-021-06232-7DOI Listing
May 2021

Influence of Caregiver Presence During Physician Office Visits on Patients Undergoing Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer.

Adv Radiat Oncol 2021 Mar-Apr;6(2):100649. Epub 2021 Jan 16.

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Department of Radiation Oncology, New Brunswick, New Jersey.

Purpose: Although the association of marital status with outcomes for patients with cancer has been widely studied, the mechanisms underpinning the protective effect of marriage are still not fully understood. The social support that marriage imparts is often discussed as an explanation for why patients with cancer who are married have better outcomes. Social support has been difficult to objectively quantify. Accompaniment of the patient at physician visits may be more meaningful than marital status itself. This study investigated the effect of caregiver presence at physician visits on treatment tolerance and outcome in patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for esophageal cancer.

Methods And Materials: Patients who received a diagnosis of esophageal cancer who underwent CRT from January 1, 2005, to January 1, 2016, as part of their curative-intent management were retrospectively reviewed. Data collected included the patients' marital status, caregiver presence at each physician visit, baseline performance status, serum albumin values and leukocyte values throughout treatment, patient weight values throughout treatment, tumor response to therapy, and overall survival. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on frequency of caregiver presence at physician visits (<50% or ≥50% of visits). Using χ tests, Wilcoxon rank sum tests, and log-rank tests, the patients' characteristics, treatment tolerance and treatment outcome, and overall survival, respectively, were compared.

Results: In total, 35 of 59 patients were defined as having frequent caregiver presence at physician visits (≥50% of all documented visits), whereas 24 patients were categorized as having infrequent caregiver accompaniment. No significant difference in performance status or weight loss before the diagnosis of esophageal cancer was found. Patients who had frequent caregiver presence at physician visits maintained body weight better than those who had infrequent caregiver presence (median weight loss of 2.7 kg compared with 4.9 kg; = .04). There was no difference in overall survival between the 2 groups.

Conclusions: Although patients with esophageal cancer undergoing CRT who had frequent caregiver presence at physician visits were not found to have an overall survival benefit, they had less weight loss, which may confer favorable treatment tolerance and maintenance of nutritional status during cancer treatment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.adro.2021.100649DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8071720PMC
January 2021

Randomized controlled trial of the mySmartSkin web-based intervention to promote skin self-examination and sun protection among individuals diagnosed with melanoma.

Transl Behav Med 2021 Apr 27. Epub 2021 Apr 27.

Department of Medicine, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, USA.

Adherence to regular, thorough skin self-examination (SSE) and consistent sun protection behaviors among melanoma survivors is relatively low. This study reports on the impact of an online intervention, called mySmartSkin (MSS), on engagement in SSE and sun protection behaviors among melanoma survivors, as well as the mediators of the intervention effects. The intervention was compared with usual care (UC), and primary outcomes were assessed at 24 and 48 weeks. Short-term outcomes were also evaluated at 8 weeks postbaseline. Results demonstrate a significant effect on SSE and sun protection. At all three follow-up assessments, the proportion of participants reporting conducting a thorough SSE in the time since the previous assessment was significantly greater in MSS than in UC. In addition, both multivariate and univariate analyses indicated that engagement in sun protection behaviors was significantly higher in MSS than UC at 24 weeks, but the effect on sun protection at 48 weeks was significant only in multivariate analyses. Beneficial effects of MSS were significantly mediated by knowledge about melanoma and characteristics of suspicious lesions, as well as self-efficacy. Participant engagement in MSS was satisfactory, with approximately two-thirds of participants completing at least two of the three core components. Content was rated as highly trusted, easy to understand, easy to navigate, and helpful. In conclusion, MSS illustrated significant and durable effects on SSE and mixed results on sun protection. Future studies should consider ways to further enhance treatment effects and engagement in MSS.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tbm/ibaa103DOI Listing
April 2021

Relationship communication and the course of psychological outcomes among couples coping with localised prostate cancer.

Eur J Cancer Care (Engl) 2021 Feb 14:e13401. Epub 2021 Feb 14.

Division of Urology, Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Objective: How couples communicate about cancer is an important predictor of psychological outcomes for men diagnosed with localised prostate cancer and their spouses. We examined the predictive role of disclosure, responsiveness, mutual avoidance, and holding back on depressive symptoms, psychological adjustment, cancer-specific distress, and cancer concerns.

Methods: Eighty-one prostate cancer patients and their spouses completed measures of communication at baseline and measures of four psychological outcomes at baseline, five, 12, and 26 weeks after baseline. Dyadic growth models tested the effects of time and role on each outcome over time.

Results: Higher disclosure and responsiveness predicted better psychological outcomes. Less mutual avoidance and holding back predicted poorer psychological outcomes. Across communication variables, individuals who engaged in poorer communication initially had poorer psychological outcomes that improved over time, whereas individuals who engaged in better communication initially maintained their more positive standing without change or changed in the positive direction. For all outcomes, those with better communication still had better psychological outcomes at six months.

Conclusion: Couples' cancer-specific relationship communication predicts their psychological outcomes. More research is needed to identify effective interventions, including a longer therapy course, individual communication training, or greater focus on addressing barriers to sharing and responsiveness.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ecc.13401DOI Listing
February 2021

Development of a Web-Based Supportive Care Program for Patients With Head and Neck Cancer.

Front Oncol 2020 15;10:602202. Epub 2020 Dec 15.

Triad Interactive Inc., Washington, DC, United States.

Patients undergoing radiation treatment for head and neck cancer experience significant side-effects that can impact a wide range of daily activities. Patients often report receiving insufficient information during and after treatment, which could impede rehabilitation efforts; they may also encounter practical and logistical barriers to receipt of supportive care. Thus, we developed a web-based program, , to provide information and strategies for managing symptom-focused concerns, which may be easily accessed from the patient's home. The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient acceptability and satisfaction with the program. In Phase 1, five patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) reviewed the web-based program and provided initial feedback, which informed program modifications. In Phase 2, 55 patients were recruited to evaluate the program. Patient assessments were obtained prior to and after use of the web-based program, and included measures of psychological distress, self-efficacy in coping with cancer-related issues, and satisfaction with the website. Among the 55 patients enrolled, 44 logged in and viewed the web-based program. Participants reported high levels of satisfaction with the information received, and indicated that the website was interesting and easy to use. Older age and higher levels of self-efficacy in coping were each associated with higher levels of satisfaction with the website. In summary, the web-based program was well-received by patients, the majority of whom found it to be informative and useful. An easy-to-use web-based program, particularly for older patients who may have difficulty locating reliable evidence-based information on the internet, may be helpful in addressing survivors' needs in symptom management and coping with cancer.

Clinical Trial Registration: https://clinicaltrials.gov/, NCT02442336.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fonc.2020.602202DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7771721PMC
December 2020

A randomized controlled trial of a web-based personalized feedback intervention targeting frequent indoor tanning bed users: Engagement, acceptability, and preliminary behavioral outcomes.

J Health Psychol 2020 Dec 22:1359105320982038. Epub 2020 Dec 22.

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, USA.

Frequent indoor tanning bed use is an established public health concern, yet research on tanning cessation interventions for frequent tanners is lacking. We describe the protocol for a brief, web-based tanning behavior change intervention and present evidence that it is acceptable and engaging to frequent indoor tanners. Lower tanning rates were not observed among participants receiving the intervention in a randomized controlled trial but participants' interest in changing tanning increased. This intervention could be a useful approach to increasing frequent tanners' interest in behavior change and openness to engaging within a more intensive, multi-component tanning cessation program. NCT03448224 Clinical Trials.gov (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03448224?cond=NCT03448224&draw=2&rank=1).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1359105320982038DOI Listing
December 2020

Quality of Life After Radiotherapy for Rectal and Anal Cancer.

Curr Colorectal Cancer Rep 2020 Feb 16;16(1):1-10. Epub 2020 Jan 16.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, United States.

Purpose Of Review: With advances in radiation therapy (RT) techniques for rectal and anal cancers allowing for the modulation of critical normal tissues, there has been an increased emphasis on improving the quality of life (QOL) of cancer survivors. Herein, we review the literature to examine the impact of RT on QOL and patient reported outcomes (PROs) to better inform providers about the challenges of survivorship.

Recent Findings: Large systematic reviews, recent studies and long-term follow-up of pivotal clinical trials have shown that RT impacts QOL, particularly fecal continence and sexual function. Modern preoperative RT techniques allow for decreased dose to organs-at-risk will likely improve QOL.

Summary: RT, though critical in the treatment of rectal and anal cancer, has a profound impact on QOL for some patients. Recent studies have included PROs and validated QOL metrics to better inform providers and patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11888-019-00448-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7336840PMC
February 2020

Prevalence and correlates of skin self-examination practices among cutaneous malignant melanoma survivors.

Prev Med Rep 2020 Sep 1;19:101110. Epub 2020 May 1.

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, United States.

Melanoma patients are at elevated risk for recurrence of the primary cancer as well as second primary melanomas. Regular skin self-examination (SSE) is recommended as part of follow-up surveillance. In this study, we examined SSE performance and comprehensiveness as well as knowledge and attitudinal correlates of SSE performance and comprehensiveness. Four hundred forty-one melanoma survivors completed measures of SSE performance as well as knowledge and attitudes about SSE and melanoma. Approximately two-thirds of the sample reported having conducted an SSE in the past two months; the average number of body parts examined was 10.64 (out of 15 maximum). Only 7.5% of the sample checked all 15 body parts. Greater worry about recurrence, fewer barriers to SSE, more planning for when to conduct SSE, and more confidence in the ability to conduct SSE and recognize a suspicious growth were associated with both SSE performance and greater SSE comprehensiveness. Physician influence was positively associated with SSE performance. Survivor education efforts may benefit from reminding survivors to check hard-to-see and sensitive areas, develop a plan for how to ask for assistance in conducting exams, as well as use mirrors to see hard-to-reach areas. Addressing perceived SSE barriers, fostering SSE planning, and improving SSE self-efficacy may be important foci for intervention efforts to enhance SSE performance and comprehensiveness.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pmedr.2020.101110DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7240727PMC
September 2020

Longitudinal course and predictors of communication and affect management self-efficacy among women newly diagnosed with gynecological cancers.

Support Care Cancer 2020 Apr 1;28(4):1929-1939. Epub 2019 Aug 1.

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany Street, New Brunswick, NJ, 08901, USA.

Objective: Self-efficacy is an important psychological resource to assist people in managing chronic illness and has been associated with psychological outcomes among patients coping with cancer. Little is known about the course of self-efficacy among gynecological cancer patients coping with cancer and the sociodemographic, medical, and psychological factors that are associated with the course of self-efficacy among these patients.

Methods: One hundred twenty-five women recently diagnosed with gynecological cancer completed a measure of communication and affective management self-efficacy at baseline, 5 weeks, 9 weeks, 6 months, 1 year, and 18 months post-baseline. Participants also completed measures of functional impairment, holding back, perceived unsupportive behaviors of family and friends, emotional expressivity, cancer concerns, depressive symptoms, cancer-specific intrusions and avoidance, problem-solving, and positive reappraisal coping.

Results: Growth curve modeling suggested that women varied considerably in their average reports of self-efficacy and varied with regard to their linear trajectories of self-efficacy over time. Average affect management self-efficacy increased significantly over time. Greater functional impairment, more holding back, more unsupportive responses from friends and family, less emotional expressivity, more cancer concerns, depression, intrusions, or avoidance predicted lower average self-efficacy over time. Women who were less emotionally expressive or held back sharing concerns less reported lower self-efficacy which increased over time.

Conclusions: It will be important for providers to identify gynecological cancer patients who report low ability to communicate feelings and needs and manage emotional reactions to cancer and offer them interventions which bolster self-efficacy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-019-04989-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6994366PMC
April 2020

Randomized controlled trial of the mySmartSkin web-based intervention to promote skin self-examination and sun protection behaviors among individuals diagnosed with melanoma: study design and baseline characteristics.

Contemp Clin Trials 2019 08 27;83:117-127. Epub 2019 Jun 27.

Center for Behavioral Health and Technology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Sciences, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, United States.

>1.2 million people in the United States have a personal history of melanoma skin cancer and are at increased risk for disease recurrence and second primary melanomas. Many of these individuals do not follow recommendations to conduct regular, thorough skin self-examinations that facilitate early disease detection and do not sufficiently engage in sun protection behaviors. In this project, we are conducting a randomized controlled trial of an innovative, tailored, theory-driven Internet intervention-called mySmartSkin-to promote these behaviors among melanoma patients. This paper outlines the study design and characteristics of the study sample. A total of 441 patients were recruited (40.9% response rate) and randomized to the mySmartSkin or a Usual Care condition. Participants complete surveys at baseline and 8 weeks, 24 weeks, and 48 weeks later. The primary aim of the project is to examine the impact of mySmartSkin versus Usual Care on skin self-examination and sun protection behaviors. The secondary aim focuses on identifying mediators of the intervention's effects. In an exploratory aim, we will examine potential moderators of the impact of the intervention. At baseline, the recruited participants had a mean age of 61 years, 49% were female, 7.5% met criteria for having conducted a recent, thorough skin self-examination, and the mean score on the index of sun protection behaviors was 3.3 (on a scale from 1 to 5). The results of the project will determine whether the mySmartSkin intervention is efficacious in promoting skin self-examination and sun protection behaviors among individuals diagnosed with melanoma. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.govNCT03028948.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cct.2019.06.014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6690854PMC
August 2019

Association of Skin Cancer Risk and Protective Behaviors with Health Literacy Among Young Adults in the USA.

Int J Behav Med 2019 Aug;26(4):372-379

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany St, New Brunswick, NJ, 08901, USA.

Background: The goal of this study was to investigate the association of health literacy with skin cancer risk and protective behaviors among young adults at moderate to high risk of skin cancer, the most common cancer.

Method: A US national sample of 958 adults, 18-25 years old, at moderate to high risk of developing skin cancer, completed a survey online. Behavioral outcomes were ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure (e.g., indoor and outdoor tanning, sunburn) and protective (e.g., sunscreen use, sunless tanning) behaviors. Multivariable regression analyses were conducted to determine whether health literacy (a four-item self-report measure assessing health-related reading, understanding, and writing) was associated with behavioral outcomes while controlling for demographic factors.

Results: Higher health literacy was independently associated with less sunbathing, odds ratio (OR) = 0.77, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.60-0.98; less indoor tanning, OR = 0.38, CI = 0.31-0.48; and less use of tanning oils, OR = 0.54, CI = 0.43-0.69. However, health literacy was also associated with a lower likelihood of wearing long pants, OR = 0.76, CI = 0.58-0.99, or a hat, OR = 0.68, CI = 0.53-0.87, when outdoors. On the other hand, higher health literacy was associated with higher incidental UV exposure, OR = 1.69, CI = 1.34-2.14, and a greater likelihood of ever having engaged in sunless tanning, OR = 1.50, CI = 1.17-1.92.

Conclusion: Interestingly, higher health literacy was associated with lower levels of intentional tanning yet also higher incidental UV exposure and lower skin protection among US young adults. These findings suggest that interventions may be needed for young adults at varying levels of health literacy as well as populations (e.g., outdoor workers, outdoor athletes/exercisers) who may be receiving large amounts of unprotected incidental UV.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12529-019-09788-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7673460PMC
August 2019

Couple-focused interventions for men with localized prostate cancer and their spouses: A randomized clinical trial.

Br J Health Psychol 2019 05 10;24(2):396-418. Epub 2019 Mar 10.

Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, Newark, Delaware, USA.

Objectives: Few couple-focused interventions have improved psychological and relationship functioning among men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer and their spouses. This study compared the impact of intimacy-enhancing therapy (IET), a general health and wellness intervention (GHW), and usual care (UC) on the psychological and relationship functioning of localized prostate cancer patients and their partners. Relationship length, relationship satisfaction, and patient masculinity were evaluated as moderators.

Design: This study was a randomized clinical trial with three study arms and four assessment time points.

Methods: A total of 237 patients and partners were randomly assigned to receive IET, GHW, or UC. Participants completed measures of psychological functioning and relationship satisfaction at baseline, 5 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months post-baseline. Primary outcomes were psychological adjustment, depression, cancer-specific distress, cancer concerns, and relationship satisfaction.

Results: Spouses in IET showed greater increases in relationship satisfaction than spouses in GHW and UC between the baseline and 5-week follow-up. Among patients in longer relationships, significant increases in psychological adjustment were found in both treatments compared to UC. Among spouses in longer relationships, psychological adjustment increased in both IET and UC but declined in GHW.

Conclusions: Intimacy-enhancing therapy did not show an impact on general or cancer-specific distress, but did show an early impact on relationship satisfaction among spouses. IET was superior to UC for patients in longer relationships. It will be important for researchers to understand which couple-focused interventions benefits both patients and spouses and to identify characteristics of patients, partners, and couples who may not benefit from psychological treatments. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer report lower health-related quality of life and both patients and spouses report elevated distress. Relationship communication plays a role in couples' psychological adaptation to prostate cancer. Couple-focused interventions have illustrated an impact on relationship communication. There are no studies comparing different couple-focused interventions. What does this study add? Intimacy-enhancing therapy was not superior to no treatment or a comparison treatment for the broad range of psychological and relationship outcomes. Intimacy-enhancing therapy was superior to no treatment for patients in longer-term relationship. The general health and wellness intervention was not beneficial for men in shorter relationships and for men who did not endorse traditional masculine norms.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjhp.12359DOI Listing
May 2019

B-Sure: a randomized pilot trial of an interactive web-based decision support aid versus usual care in average-risk breast cancer patients considering contralateral prophylactic mastectomy.

Transl Behav Med 2020 05;10(2):355-363

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA.

The use of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) is increasing among breast cancer patients who are at average or "sporadic" risk for contralateral breast cancer. Because CPM provides no survival benefit for these patients, it is not medically recommended for them. Decision support aids may facilitate more informed, higher quality CPM decision. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of B-Sure, an online decision support aid to facilitate informed decisions regarding CPM, and to compare the impact of B-Sure in increasing CPM knowledge, reducing decisional conflict, and increasing preparedness to make the CPM decision among breast cancer patients at sporadic risk who are considering CPM. Ninety-three patients with unilateral, nonhereditary breast cancer considering CPM completed a baseline survey, were randomized to receive B-Sure or Usual care, and completed a 4-week follow-up survey assessing decisional conflict, preparedness to make the CPM decision, and CPM knowledge as well as self-efficacy, perceived risk, worry, CPM motivations, and the surgical decision. Study participation was high. B-Sure was viewed by almost 80% of the participants and was evaluated positively. At follow-up, patients assigned to B-Sure reported significantly higher clarity regarding the personal values relevant to the CPM decision and higher knowledge about CPM. B-Sure had smaller effects on other aspects of decisional conflict. B-Sure improved CPM knowledge and reduced decisional conflict. Patients considering CPM may benefit from an online decision support aid, but may be sensitive to approaches that they perceive as biased against CPM.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tbm/iby133DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7528847PMC
May 2020

Culturally-adapted behavioral intervention to improve colorectal cancer screening uptake among foreign-born South Asians in New Jersey: the Desi Sehat trial.

Ethn Health 2021 May 4;26(4):554-570. Epub 2018 Nov 4.

Section of Population Science, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, USA.

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer among Americans of South Asian (SA) descent and is a significant public health concern in SA communities. Rates of screening compliance among foreign-born SAs are very low. The goal of this study was to report on the development, acceptability, and preliminary impact of a culturally-targeted 1:1 intervention delivered in English, Hindi, and Urdu, called Desi-Sehat. Ninety-three foreign-born SAs between the ages of 50 and 75 were recruited using community-based organization methods. Participants completed a baseline survey, participated in a 1:1 session with a community health educator, and a follow-up survey was administered four months after the baseline. The acceptance rate was moderate (52.8%). Attendance at the intervention session was high. More than half of the population did not complete the follow-up survey (58.7%). Participant evaluations of the intervention were high. Intent-to-treat analyses indicate a 30% four month follow-up CRC screening uptake. There were significant increases in knowledge and significant reductions in perceived barriers to screening, worry about CRC screening tests, and worry about CRC. Effect sizes for significant changes were in the medium to large range. Desi Sehat was a well-evaluated and participation in the session was high, participant knowledge significantly increased, and screening barriers, worry about CRC, and worry about CRC screening tests declined significantly. Future studies should focus on enhancing recruitment and retention and include a randomized control design.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13557858.2018.1539219DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6500482PMC
May 2021

The course and predictors of perceived unsupportive responses by family and friends among women newly diagnosed with gynecological cancers.

Transl Behav Med 2019 07;9(4):682-692

Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Temple Health, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Perceived unsupportive responses from close others play an important role in psychological adaptation of patients with cancer. Little is known about whether these negative responses change after someone experiences a serious life event, and even less is known about the individual characteristics and related factors that might contribute to both the levels of and changes in perceived unsupportive responses over the course of adaptation to an experience. This longitudinal study aimed to evaluate changes in perceived unsupportive behavior from family and friends among women newly with gynecologic cancer as well as initial demographic, disease, and psychological factors that predict the course of perceived unsupportive behavior over time. Women (N = 125) assigned to the usual care arm of a randomized clinical trial comparing a coping and communication intervention with a supportive counseling intervention to usual care completed six surveys over an 18 month period. Growth models using multilevel modeling were used to predict unsupportive responses over time. Average levels of perceived unsupportive responses from family and friends were low. Unsupportive responses varied from patient to patient, but patients did not report a systematic change in perceived unsupportive responses over time. Cultivating meaning and peace and coping efficacy were associated with fewer perceived unsupportive responses as well as reductions in perceived unsupportive responses over time. Emotional distress, cancer concerns, functional impairment, holding back sharing concerns, and cognitive and behavioral avoidance predicted higher perceived unsupportive responses over time. The findings are discussed in terms of the self-presentation theory and social network responses to persons undergoing difficult life events.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tbm/iby087DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7184866PMC
July 2019

Acceptance, social support, benefit-finding, and depression in women with gynecological cancer.

Qual Life Res 2018 Nov 20;27(11):2991-3002. Epub 2018 Aug 20.

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany Street, New Brunswick, NJ, 08903, USA.

Purpose: Although studies have demonstrated a protective role for benefit finding in psychological distress, little is known about how benefit finding leads to lower psychological distress. This study's goal was to use a multiple mediator model to evaluate whether the effect of benefit-finding on depression was mediated by acceptance of cancer, acceptance of emotions, and received social support.

Methods: One hundred seventy-four women recently diagnosed with gynecological cancer completed measures of perceived benefits from the cancer experience, acceptance-based strategies, social support, and depression. Using a cross-sectional approach, we analyzed a multiple mediator model with benefit-finding as the independent variable, depressive symptom severity as the outcome, and acceptance-based strategies and social support as mediators.

Results: Acceptance-based strategies and social support significantly mediated the relationship between benefit-finding and depression. Emotional acceptance had the strongest mediational effect, controlling for the other two mediators.

Conclusions: Helping women diagnosed with gynecological cancers identify benefits from their cancer experience may reduce depression by paving the way for them to accept their emotional reactions, accept life changes associated with cancer, and facilitate supportive reactions from family and friends. Future longitudinal research is needed to confirm whether gynecological cancer patients who perceive more benefits will feel less depressed later.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11136-018-1953-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6196117PMC
November 2018

Levels of emotional awareness during psychotherapy among gynecologic cancer patients.

Palliat Support Care 2019 02 8;17(1):87-94. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey,New Brunswick,NJ.

Objective: Emotional awareness is the ability to recognize, describe, and attend to emotions. A known correlate is emotional processing, the ability to orient to and use inner experiences for information. The goal was to examine emotional awareness during therapy among gynecologic cancer patients, identify baseline predictors, and explore the relationship between in-session emotional awareness and processing.

Method: Psychotherapy and baseline data from a randomized controlled trial comparing a supportive counseling (SC) intervention and a cognitive-behavioral coping and communication (CCI) intervention were used. The sample was patients with gynecologic cancers randomized to either therapy (N = 246). Emotion episode transcripts from the first, middle, and sixth of seven in-person sessions were coded for emotional awareness using the Program for Open-Ended Scoring and emotional processing using the Experiencing Scale. Descriptive and regression analyses were conducted.ResultParticipants had moderate in-session emotional awareness. SC participants exhibited higher levels of awareness in the first (p < 0.001) and sixth (p = 0.002) sessions than CCI participants. Awareness was positively correlated with emotional processing in the first and sixth SC sessions (r = 0.25 and 0.24, respectively) and all CCI sessions (r = 0.29-0.31). Baseline negative emotion expression was associated with awareness during the sixth SC session. Baseline cancer-specific distress was associated with awareness during the sixth CCI session.Significance of resultsSC may facilitate emotional awareness. Greater emotional awareness in therapy may facilitate emotional processing, which is an important component of most psychotherapies. Patients who are psychologically distressed may exhibit more awareness than others. Similarly, greater emotional awareness may signal greater patient distress.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1478951518000263DOI Listing
February 2019

The Potential of Behavioral Counseling to Prevent Skin Cancer.

JAMA Dermatol 2018 05;154(5):519-521

Cancer Prevention, Control, and Population Research, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamadermatol.2018.0325DOI Listing
May 2018

Healthy Body Image Intervention Delivered to Young Women via Facebook Groups: Formative Study of Engagement and Acceptability.

JMIR Res Protoc 2018 Feb 20;7(2):e54. Epub 2018 Feb 20.

Institute for Collaboration on Health, Intervention and Policy, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, United States.

Background: There is increasing interest in using social media sites such as Facebook to deliver health interventions so as to expose people to content while they are engaging in their usual social media habit. This formative intervention development study is novel in describing a preliminary test of using the secret group feature of Facebook to deliver a behavioral intervention targeting users of indoor tanning beds to reduce their risk of skin cancer. Intervention content was designed to challenge body image-related constructs associated with indoor tanning through the use of dissonance-inducing content.

Objective: To evaluate engagement with and acceptability of using a secret Facebook group to deliver a healthy body image intervention to young women engaged in indoor tanning.

Methods: Seventeen young women completed a baseline survey and joined a secret Facebook group with intervention content delivered via daily posts for 4 weeks. Engagement data was extracted and acceptability was measured via a follow-up survey.

Results: The study had a high retention rate (94%, [16/17]). On average, posts were viewed by 91% of participants, liked by 35%, and commented on by 26%. The average comment rate was highest (65%) for posts that elicited comments by directly posing questions or discussion topics to the group. Average intervention acceptability ratings were highly positive and participants reported feeling connected to the group and its topic. Average rates of past 1-month indoor tanning reported following the intervention were lower than the baseline rate (P=.08, Cohen d=0.47).

Conclusions: This study is novel in demonstrating participant engagement with and acceptability of using Facebook secret groups to deliver a dissonance-inducing intervention approach that utilizes group-based discussions related to body image. The study is also unique within the field of skin cancer prevention by demonstrating the potential value of delivering an indoor tanning intervention within an interactive social media format. The findings suggest that Facebook metrics of intervention post engagement (ie, likes and comments) may vary based on post types and that designing specifically labeled discussion posts may be helpful for soliciting engagement as well as challenging beliefs.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/resprot.9429DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5840477PMC
February 2018

Review of interventions to reduce ultraviolet tanning: Need for treatments targeting excessive tanning, an emerging addictive behavior.

Psychol Addict Behav 2017 Dec 22;31(8):962-978. Epub 2017 Jun 22.

Division of Population Sciences, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey.

Millions of Americans engage in tanning each year, defined as intentional ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure in the form of sunbathing or the use of indoor tanning beds. An emerging body of research suggests that UVR has addictive properties and some tanners engage in excessive tanning. This article provides an overview of the evidence of tanning addiction and a systematic review of existing tanning interventions with the goal of evaluating their potential to impact addicted tanners. Our search identified 24 intervention studies that were summarized and discussed according to 3 primary themes. First, there is a dearth of tanning interventions that target excessive tanning or are designed as treatments for tanning addiction. Second, tanning interventions are primarily educational interventions designed to increase knowledge of the risks of tanning. Third, there are notable aspects of existing tanning interventions that are relevant to addiction science, including the use of brief motivational and cognitive-behavioral-based interventions. Future directions are considered including recommendations for utilizing the existing evidence base to formulate interventions targeting excessive tanners. (PsycINFO Database Record
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/adb0000289DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5714671PMC
December 2017

Emotional processing during psychotherapy among women newly diagnosed with a gynecological cancer.

Palliat Support Care 2017 08 14;15(4):405-416. Epub 2016 Dec 14.

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey,New Brunswick,New Jersey.

Objective: Our aim was to compare changes in emotional processing by women newly diagnosed with gynecological cancer enrolled in either a coping and communication skills intervention (CCI) or a supportive counseling (SC) intervention. We examined the association between in-session emotional processing and patient-rated therapeutic progress.

Method: Three therapy sessions with 201 patients were rated for the depth of emotional processing (peak and mode) during emotion episodes (EEs) using the Experiencing Rating Scale (EXP). Participants completed measures of dispositional emotional expressivity, depressive symptoms, and cancer-related distress before treatment began, as well as ratings of perceived progress in therapy after each session.

Results: Peak EXP ratings averaged between 2.7 and 3.1, indicating that women discussed events, their emotional reactions, and their private experiences in sessions. A small proportion of patients had high levels of processing, indicating deeper exploration of the meaning of their feelings and experiences. Women in SC were able to achieve a higher level of emotional processing during the middle and later sessions, and during cancer-related EEs in the later session. However, emotional processing was not significantly associated with a patient's perceived therapeutic progress with SC. In the CCI group, higher levels of emotional processing were associated with greater session progress, suggesting that it may play an important role in patient-rated treatment outcomes.

Significance Of Results: Newly diagnosed gynecological cancer patients are able to attend to their emotions and personal experiences, particularly when discussing cancer-related issues during both short-term SC and prescriptive coping skills interventions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1478951516000845DOI Listing
August 2017

A comparison of two psychological interventions for newly-diagnosed gynecological cancer patients.

Gynecol Oncol 2017 Feb 23;144(2):354-362. Epub 2016 Nov 23.

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA.

Objective: This study compared the efficacy of two psychological interventions, a coping and communication-enhancing intervention (CCI) and supportive counseling (SC), in reducing depressive symptoms, cancer-specific distress, fear of recurrence, and emotional well-being of women diagnosed with gynecological cancer. Demographic, medical, and psychological moderators of intervention effects were evaluated.

Methods: Three hundred fifty-two women with gynecological cancer were randomly assigned to eight sessions of CCI, eight sessions of SC, or usual care (UC). Participants completed measures of distress and wellbeing at six time points over an 18month period of time.

Results: CCI had a beneficial impact on depressive symptoms and cancer specific distress over the first six months as compared with UC and SC and had a beneficial impact on emotional well-being. The greater coping skill development in CCI has made it a more effective intervention than traditional SC across a broader range of key psychological outcomes. Declines among women in the SC condition were not significantly different from UC.

Conclusions: The CCI intervention had significant effect on patients' depression, cancer-specific distress, and emotional well-being during a time when the majority of newly diagnosed patients experience elevated levels of distress. Ameliorating such distress post-diagnosis merits its incorporation into clinical care. A brief 8-session structured intervention can be readily applied to this distressed population in need. Brief supportive counseling did not evidence treatment effects, suggesting that more structured approaches are crucial to truly deliver benefits.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2016.11.025DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5239741PMC
February 2017

Group therapy processes and treatment outcomes in 2 couple-focused group interventions for breast cancer patients.

Psychooncology 2017 Dec 28;26(12):2175-2185. Epub 2016 Dec 28.

Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Background: There has been little attention paid to the role of therapeutic processes in group therapy outcomes for cancer patients participating in group. The goal was to evaluate the contribution of 3 group processes-group climate (conflict, engagement, and avoidance) working alliance and therapeutic realizations-to the outcomes of 2 couple-focused approaches to group treatment.

Methods: Three hundred and two women with early stage breast cancer and their partners were randomized to one of 2 conditions: an 8-session enhanced couple-focused group (ECG) intervention or a couples' support group participated. Couples completed measures of depressive symptoms and well-being before and 6 months after group. Group process measures were completed after sessions 4 and 8.

Results: Support group participants (both patients and partners) perceived higher engagement and less avoidance than ECG participants. Conflict, working alliance, and therapeutic realizations did not differ. Group engagement, working alliance, and therapeutic realizations increased, and group conflict decreased over the course of both treatments. Greater conflict was associated with more posttreatment anxiety and lower well-being, and engagement was associated with higher posttreatment well-being. Patients whose partners reported higher conflict reported greater posttreatment anxiety. Working alliance was associated with posttreatment anxiety for ECG patients and with well-being among participants whose partners reported higher working alliance.

Conclusions: Fostering a positive group environment bolsters treatment efficacy for women with early stage breast cancer and their partners attending couple-focused groups. Facilitating the leader-member alliance bolsters treatment efficacy. Improving engagement with one member of a couple impacts the other member.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pon.4323DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5548627PMC
December 2017

Therapy processes, progress, and outcomes for 2 therapies for gynecological cancer patients.

Psychooncology 2017 Dec 22;26(12):2069-2078. Epub 2016 Dec 22.

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, USA.

Objective: Although a number of effective psychotherapies have been identified for cancer patients, little is known about therapy processes, as they unfold the course of treatment and the role of therapy processes in treatment outcome. We used growth curve modeling to evaluate the associations between therapy processes and outcomes among gynecological cancer patients participating in 2 types of therapy.

Methods: Two hundred twenty five women newly diagnosed with gynecological cancer were randomly assigned to receive 8 sessions of a coping and communication intervention or a client-centered supportive therapy. Participants completed measures of preintervention and postintervention depression, working alliance after Session 2, and postsession progress and depressive symptoms after each session. Therapists completed measures of perceived patient progress.

Results: Both patients and therapists reported a steady increase in session progress and patients reported a steady decrease in depressive symptoms over the course of both the coping and communication intervention and client-centered supportive sessions. Perceived progress in one session predicted progress in the subsequent session. Early working alliance predicted improved session progress and reductions in postsession depressive symptoms over sessions. Working alliance did not predict prepost treatment changes in depression. Patient-rated session progress predicted greater reductions in pretreatment to posttreatment depression, but therapist-rated progress did not.

Conclusions: For 2 types of treatment delivered to women diagnosed with gynecological cancer, patient-rated session progress and depressive symptoms rated over therapy sessions may serve as a yardstick that can be useful to therapists to gauge patient's response to treatment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pon.4310DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5526739PMC
December 2017

An online skin cancer risk-reduction intervention for young adults: Mechanisms of effects.

Health Psychol 2017 Mar 7;36(3):215-225. Epub 2016 Nov 7.

ncer Prevention and Control, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey.

Objective: The study's purpose was to investigate moderator, implementation, and mediator variables related to the efficacy of UV4.me, an Internet intervention that decreased ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposure and increased skin protection behaviors among young adults.

Method: A total of 965 18-25 year olds at risk for skin cancer were recruited nationally online. Participants were randomized to an experimental website (UV4.me), a control website, or assessment only. Participant characteristics (moderators), engagement with and perceptions of interventions (implementation measures), and exposure and protection attitudinal variables (mediators) were assessed. Linear regression and mediation analyses were conducted.

Results: Intervention effects on skin protection were greater for participants with a family history of skin cancer (p = .01). Intervention effects on UV exposure were greater among recent indoor tanners (p = .04). Improvements in skin protection (but not UV exposure) were associated with perceiving the interventions as satisfying or helpful (ps < .01). The experimental group had better outcomes if they completed more modules (ps < .01) or set more behavioral goals (ps < .01). Knowledge and exposure decisional balance mediated intervention effects for UV exposure (ps < .05), and protection decisional balance, self-efficacy, and intentions mediated intervention effects for protection (ps < .05).

Conclusions: The experimental intervention was more efficacious for certain high risk groups. The more individuals liked and engaged with the interventions (e.g., by setting goals), the better their outcomes. Mediation results inform theory about change mechanisms and differed by behavioral outcome. (PsycINFO Database Record
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hea0000420DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5328853PMC
March 2017

Attitudes and Decisional Conflict Regarding Breast Reconstruction Among Breast Cancer Patients.

Cancer Nurs 2016 Nov/Dec;39(6):427-436

Author Affiliations: Section of Population Science, Department of Medicine, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers, the Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick (Drs Manne, Kirstein, Myers Virtue, and Devine and Mss Gajda, Frederick, and Darabos); Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Dr Topham); MD Anderson Cancer Center at Cooper Health Systems, Voorhees Township, New Jersey (Dr Brill); and Department of Surgery, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Ms Sorice).

Background: The decision to undergo breast reconstruction (BR) surgery after mastectomy is made during stressful circumstances. Many women do not feel well prepared to make this decision.

Objective: Using the Ottawa Decision Support Framework, this study aims to describe women's reasons to choose or not choose BR, BR knowledge, decisional preparedness, and decisional conflict about BR. Possible demographic, medical, BR knowledge, and attitudinal correlates of decisional conflict about BR were also evaluated.

Methods: Participants were 55 women with early-stage breast cancer drawn from the baseline data of a pilot randomized trial evaluating the efficacy of a BR decision support aid for breast cancer patients considering BR.

Results: The most highly ranked reasons to choose BR were the desire for breasts to be equal in size, the desire to wake up from surgery with a breast in place, and perceived bother of a scar with no breast. The most highly ranked reasons not to choose BR were related to the surgical risks and complications. Regression analyses indicated that decisional conflict was associated with higher number of reasons not to choose BR and lower levels of decisional preparedness.

Conclusions: The results suggest that breast cancer patients considering BR may benefit from decisional support.

Implications For Clinical Practice: Healthcare professionals may facilitate decision making by focusing on reasons for each patient's uncertainty and unaddressed concerns. All patients, even those who have consulted with a plastic surgeon and remain uncertain about their decision, may benefit from decision support from a health professional.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000320DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4947023PMC
July 2017

Quality of life trajectories after diagnosis of gynecologic cancer: a theoretically based approach.

Support Care Cancer 2017 02 19;25(2):589-598. Epub 2016 Oct 19.

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Purpose: The course of quality of life after diagnosis of gynecologic cancer is not well understood. We aimed to identify subgroups of gynecologic cancer patients with distinct trajectories of quality of life outcomes in the 18-month period after diagnosis. We also aimed to determine whether these subgroups could be distinguished by predictors derived from Social-Cognitive Processing Theory.

Methods: Gynecologic cancer patients randomized to usual care as part of a psychological intervention trial (NCT01951807) reported on depressed mood, quality of life, and physical impairment soon after diagnosis and at five additional assessments ending 18 months after baseline. Clinical, demographic, and psychosocial predictors were assessed at baseline, and additional clinical factors were assessed between 6 and 18 months after baseline.

Results: A two-group growth mixture model provided the best and most interpretable fit to the data for all three outcomes. One class revealed subclinical and improving scores for mood, quality of life, and physical function across 18 months. A second class represented approximately 12 % of patients with persisting depression, diminished quality of life, and greater physical disability. Membership of this high-risk subgroup was associated with holding back concerns, more intrusive thoughts, and use of pain medications at the baseline assessment (ps < .05).

Conclusions: Trajectories of quality of life outcomes were identified in the 18-month period after diagnosis of gynecologic cancer. Potentially modifiable psychosocial risk factors were identified that can have implications for preventing quality of life disruptions and treating impaired quality of life in future research.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-016-3443-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5199611PMC
February 2017

Group-based trajectory modeling of fear of disease recurrence among women recently diagnosed with gynecological cancers.

Psychooncology 2017 Nov 9;26(11):1799-1809. Epub 2016 Aug 9.

Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Objective: Fear of cancer recurrence is an important clinical phenomenon and is associated with decrements in life domains. The study goals were to characterize patterns of global fear of recurrence (FOR) and 4 domains of fear (health, role, womanhood, and death worry) over time in women who were diagnosed with gynecological cancer and to identify demographic, medical, and psychological predictors of FOR.

Method: One hundred eighteen women participating in the usual care arm of a randomized trial completed the Concerns about Recurrence scale as well as measures of depressive symptoms, cancer-specific distress, coping, coping efficacy, and social network responses at 4 time points. The majority of the sample was diagnosed with stage 3 ovarian cancer.

Results: Group-based trajectory modeling identified subgroups of women with high-stable (49.1%), high-decreasing (25.3%), and low-stable (25.5%) trajectories for global FOR. For role worries, 3 similar group trajectories were identified. For health worries, modeling identified subgroups with high-decreasing (19.1%) and low-increasing (80.9%) trajectories. For womanhood worries, modeling identified subgroups with high-increasing (15.7%) and low-decreasing (84.2%) trajectories. Young age, metastatic cancer, depression, cancer distress, holding back, and lower coping efficacy were associated with the high-stable global FOR and at least 1 domain of FOR.

Conclusion: Almost half of the women recently diagnosed with gynecological cancer evidence persistently elevated FOR over the 6-month period postdiagnosis. Psychological interventions to reduce FOR may be more effective if they focus on teaching patients coping skills, as well as greater comfort expressing cancer-specific concerns to others.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pon.4223DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5507742PMC
November 2017

Erratum to: Recall of indoor tanning salon warnings and safety guidelines among a national sample of tanners.

Transl Behav Med 2016 12;6(4):628

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany Street, New Brunswick, NJ, 08903-2681, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13142-016-0413-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5110496PMC
December 2016

Recall of indoor tanning salon warnings and safety guidelines among a national sample of tanners.

Transl Behav Med 2016 12;6(4):622-627

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany Street, 5th floor, Room 5549.20, New Brunswick, NJ, 08903-2681, USA.

Indoor tanning (IT) is a known carcinogen, and regulation has increased across the USA. However, there is minimal point-of-sale regulation for adult users. The purpose of the present study is to explore whether IT users recall being provided with warnings or safety guidelines at tanning salons. A national sample of 273 young adult, female IT users (mean age = 22.26, SD = 2.38) was surveyed regarding the frequency that they recalled being provided with six different warnings and safety guidelines when at tanning salons. Between 65 and 90.1 % of participants reported recalling the various warnings and guidelines. Having very fair skin was reported by 16.8 % of participants, and these high-risk individuals were less likely to recall having read and signed a consent form than other IT users (p = .002). The current level of regulation is insufficient to provide IT users with consistent warnings and safety guidelines at tanning salons.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13142-016-0392-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5110492PMC
December 2016