Publications by authors named "Sharon Carpinello"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Project Liberty: New York's crisis counseling program created in the aftermath of September 11, 2001.

Psychiatr Serv 2006 Sep;57(9):1253-8

Center for Information Technology and Evaluation Research, New York State Office of Mental Health, Albany, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/ps.2006.57.9.1253DOI Listing
September 2006

The role of state mental health authorities in promoting improved client outcomes through evidence-based practice.

Community Ment Health J 2005 Jun;41(3):347-63

University of Kansas School of Social Welfare, 1545 Lilac Lane, Lawrence, KS, USA.

The role of state mental health authorities (SMHA) is critical to implementing and sustaining evidence-based practices. This paper describes the seven major tasks of SMHA's that comprise that role and provides examples from states which have been actively pursuing evidence-based practices.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10597-005-5008-8DOI Listing
June 2005

Going proactive: embracing outreach and prevention in the public mental health arena.

Behav Healthc Tomorrow 2004 Dec;13(6):8-9

New York State Office of Mental Health, USA.

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December 2004

Psychotropic medications prescribing patterns for children and adolescents in New York's public mental health system.

Community Ment Health J 2004 Apr;40(2):101-18

Mental Health Services and Policy Program, Northwestern University, USA.

Context: Breakthroughs in the development of effective medications for a number of psychiatric disorders have led to increased use of these compounds in the treatment of children.

Objectives: To understand the use of psychotropic medications in the treatment of children, a state-wide study was undertaken based on the data collected in a large planning study. DATA AND SETTING: A stratified random sample of 10 different program types in New York State produced data on children served in different specialty mental health services.

Participants: Randomly selected cases were reviewed at a randomly selected sites to generate a sample of 1592 cases on which data were collected on clinical presentation and service use, including psychotropic medication prescriptions.

Main Outcome Measures: The Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths (CANS-MH) tool was used to provide a reliable review of clinical indicators.

Results: Psychotropic medication use is common in the children's public mental health service system in New York. Most children served in high intensity settings receive medication as a part of their treatment. It appears that most prescriptions for stimulants and antidepressants are consistent with either diagnostic or symptom indications. Many children with these indications are not on medications. On the other hand, a large number of children without evidence of psychosis receive antipsychotic medications.

Conclusion: The evidence suggests that stimulant and antidepressant are not over-prescribed. However, the use of antipsychotic medications for other indications is a priority for further research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/b:comh.0000022731.65054.3eDOI Listing
April 2004

Using state administrative and pharmacy data bases to develop a clinical decision support tool for schizophrenia guidelines.

Schizophr Bull 2002 ;28(1):85-94

Bureau of Evidence based Medicine and Clinical Guidelines, New York State Office of Mental Health, Albany 12229, USA.

Administrative and pharmacy data bases represent a largely untapped resource for clinical decision support and quality improvement. In this study, we examined the feasibility of using New York State Office of Mental Health (NYSOMH) data bases to develop an automated clinical report to support implementation of schizophrenia guidelines. First we reviewed the structure of existing data bases for capacity and limitations in supporting guideline implementation. Second, we identified schizophrenia guideline recommendations and adherence measures that would be the focus of our implementation. Third, a preliminary report was programmed, based on operational definitions of the guideline recommendations. Finally, we developed user groups to define content and format of new reports, through an iterative process of field testing, feedback, and revision. Our experience suggests that administrative and pharmacy data bases, despite their limitations, can be used to develop guideline-based clinical decision support tools for schizophrenia with high physician acceptability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordjournals.schbul.a006929DOI Listing
December 2002