Publications by authors named "Sharmila Kurapati"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Stability-indicating HPLC method for acyclovir and lidocaine in topical formulations.

Biomed Chromatogr 2020 Mar 12;34(3):e4751. Epub 2020 Jan 12.

Department of Drug Discovery and Development, Harrison School of Pharmacy, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA.

A simple, rapid and accurate stability-indicating HPLC assay was developed for the determination of acyclovir and lidocaine in topical formulations. Chromatographic separation of acyclovir and lidocaine was achieved using a reversed-phase C column and a gradient mobile phase (20 mm ammonium acetate pH 3.5 in water and acetonitrile). The degradation products of acyclovir and lidocaine in the samples were analyzed by ultra performance liquid chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry. The HPLC method successfully resolved the analytes from the impurities and degradation products in the topical formulation. Furthermore, the method detected the analytes from the human skin leachables following the extraction of the analytes in the skin homogenate samples. The method showed linearity over wide ranges of 5-500 and 10-200 μg/ml for acyclovir and lidocaine in the topical product, respectively, with a correlation coefficient (r ) >0.9995. The relative standard deviations for precision, repeatability, and robustness of the method validation assays were <2%. The skin extraction efficiency for acyclovir and lidocaine was 92.8 ± 0.7% and 91.3 ± 3.2%, respectively, with no interference from the skin leachables. Thus, simultaneous quantification of acyclovir and lidocaine in the topical formulations was achieved.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bmc.4751DOI Listing
March 2020

Microemulsion and Microporation Effects on the Genistein Permeation Across Dermatomed Human Skin.

AAPS PharmSciTech 2018 Nov 23;19(8):3481-3489. Epub 2018 Aug 23.

Department of Drug Discovery and Development, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama, 36849, USA.

This study reports the microemulsion (ME) effects on the permeation of genistein across normal (intact) and microporated human skin. The genistein formulation was optimized to know the stable ME region in the pseudo-ternary phase diagrams and to maximize the skin permeation and retention of genistein. The phase diagrams were constructed with different oil phases, surfactants, and their combinations. The influence of formulation factors on the permeation through intact and microporated human skin was determined. Based on its wide ME region, as well as permeation enhancement effects, oleic acid was used as an oil phase with various surfactants and co-surfactants to further maximize the ME region and skin permeation. The water content in the formulation played an important role in the ME stability, droplet size, and flux of genistein. For example, the ME with 20% water exhibited 4- and 9-fold higher flux as compared to the ME base (no water) and aqueous suspension, respectively. Likewise, this formulation had demonstrated 2- and 4-fold higher skin retention as compared to the ME base (no water) and aqueous suspension, respectively. The skin microporation did not significantly increase the skin permeation of genistein from ME formulations. The ME composition, water content, and to a lesser extent the ME particle size played a role in improving the skin permeation and retention of genistein.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1208/s12249-018-1150-9DOI Listing
November 2018