Publications by authors named "Shaodi Ma"

9 Publications

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Association of child maltreatment and bullying victimization among chinese adolescents: The mediating role of family function, resilience, and anxiety.

J Affect Disord 2021 Nov 22;299:12-21. Epub 2021 Nov 22.

Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, No. 81 Meishan Road, Hefei 230032, Anhui, China; Center for Evidence-Based Practice, Anhui Medical University, No. 81 Meishan Road, Hefei 230032, Anhui, China. Electronic address:

Background: Among adolescents, child maltreatment is linked to being bullied at school. Nevertheless, little is known about the mediating mechanisms underlying this association. Therefore, our research aimed to explore and evaluate the potential mediators of the relationship between child maltreatment and bullying victimization among Chinese adolescents.

Methods: From October to December 2020, a population-based cross-sectional survey was conducted among 6247 adolescents (3401 males, 2846 females) in Anhui Province, China. The subjects of the survey were elementary and middle school students from grades 4 to 9. The data were collected through self-report questionnaires. Pearson correlation and linear regression were used to examine the relationships among child maltreatment, bullying victimization, family function, resilience, and anxiety. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was employed to conduct mediation analyses.

Results: The results indicated that child maltreatment positively predicted the later bullying victimization of adolescents. Resilience and anxiety were each shown to separately mediate this relationship. Moreover, the sequential mediating effects of family function, resilience, and anxiety also mediated the predictive effect of child maltreatment on bullying victimization.

Conclusions: Resilience and anxiety were both shown to be important independent mediators for the relationship between child maltreatment and bullying victimization. Furthermore, the combined mediating effects of family function, resilience, and anxiety were also of great significance. These findings provide additional evidence that family and individual factors are critical to understanding bullying victimization. Effective prevention and intervention strategies for school bullying should target family and individual vulnerabilities in adolescents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2021.11.053DOI Listing
November 2021

The Association Between Anti-diabetic Agents and Clinical Outcomes of COVID-19 in Patients with Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Arch Med Res 2021 Aug 9. Epub 2021 Aug 9.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA.

Background And Aims: During the current Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, patients with diabetes face disproportionately more. This study was performed to clarify anti-inflammatory effects of anti-diabetic agents on COVID-19 in patients with diabetes.

Methods And Results: Relevant literature was searched on 15 databases up to November 14, 2020 and was updated on April 13, 2021. The pooled ORs along with 95% CIs were calculated to evaluate combined effects. 31 studies with 66,914 patients were included in qualitative and quantitative synthesis. Meta-analysis showed that metformin was associated with a statistically significant lower mortality (pooled OR = 0.62, 95% CI, 0.50-0.76, p = 0.000) and poor composite outcomes (pooled OR = 0.83, 95% CI, 0.71-0.97, p = 0.022) in diabetic patients with COVID-19. Significance of slight lower mortality remained in sulfonylurea/glinides (pooled OR = 0.93, 95% CI, 0.89-0.98, p = 0.004), but of poor composite outcomes was not (pooled OR = 1.48, 95% CI, 0.61-3.60, p = 0.384). Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4 inhibitors) were associated with statistically non-significant lower mortality (pooled OR = 0.95, 95% CI, 0.72-1.26, p = 0.739) or poor composite outcomes (pooled OR = 1.27, 95% CI, 0.91-1.77, p = 0.162) of COVID-19 in diabetic patients.

Conclusion: Metformin might be beneficial in decreasing mortality and poor composite outcomes in diabetic patients infected with SARS-CoV-2. DPP-4 inhibitors, sulfonylurea/glinides, SGLT-2 inhibitors, and GLP-1RA would not seem to be adverse. There was insufficient evidence to conclude effects of other anti-diabetic agents. Limited by retrospective characteristics, with relative weak capability to verify causality, more prospective studies, especially RCTs are needed. Registration number: PROSPERO-CRD42020221951.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arcmed.2021.08.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8349690PMC
August 2021

Radiofrequency ablation versus stereotactic body radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: a meta-analysis.

Future Oncol 2021 Oct 19;17(30):4027-4040. Epub 2021 Jul 19.

Department of Epidemiology & Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, No. 81 Meishan Road, Hefei, Anhui 230032, China.

The present meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. A systematic literature search was conducted of online databases prior to February 21, 2021. Eleven articles involving 8429 patients were included. The pooled hazard ratio for overall survival (OS) of RFA versus SBRT was 0.79 (p < 0.001). Statistically significant differences were found in the 1-, 2-, 3-, 4- and 5-year pooled OS and freedom from local progression (FFLP) rates between the two groups, favoring the RFA arms. However, the pooled local control (LC) rates were higher in the SBRT arm. RFA provided better OS and FFLP for treating HCC, while SBRT achieved superior LC. CRD42020207877.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fon-2021-0263DOI Listing
October 2021

Comprehensive Analysis of Family Members Prognostic Value and Immune Infiltration in Gastric Cancer.

Life (Basel) 2021 Jun 3;11(6). Epub 2021 Jun 3.

The First Affiliated Hospital of USTC, Division of Life Sciences and Medicine, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230001, China.

Gastric cancer (GC) is the fifth most common cancer globally. Secreted frizzled-related proteins (SFRP) are important elements associated with the Wnt signaling pathway, and its dysregulated expression is found in multiple cancers. However, the function of distinct in GC remains poorly understood. We investigated the differential expression, prognostic value, and immune cell infiltration of in gastric cancer patients from the Oncomine, Gene Expression Profiling Interactive Analysis (GEPIA), UALCAN, Kaplan-Meier plotter, cBioPortal, STRING, Gene-MANIA, DAVID, MethSurv, and TIMER databases. We found that the expression levels of and were significantly increased in GC tissues, whereas the and expressions were reduced. , , and were significantly correlated with the clinical cancer stage in GC patients. Higher expression of was associated with short overall survival (OS) in GC patients. Besides, high methylation showed favorable OS in GC patients. The functions of were primarily related to the Wnt signaling pathway, immune system development, and basal cell carcinoma. The expression of was strongly correlated with immune infiltrating cells, including CD4+ T cells and macrophages in GC. Our study indicated that could be potential targets of precision therapy and prognostic biomarkers for the survival of GC patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/life11060522DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8228899PMC
June 2021

The impact of prenatal stressful life events on adverse birth outcomes: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

J Affect Disord 2021 05 31;287:406-416. Epub 2021 Mar 31.

Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, No. 81 Meishan Road, Hefei 230032, Anhui, China; Centre for Evidence-Based Practice, Anhui Medical University, No. 81 Meishan Road, Hefei 230032, Anhui, China. Electronic address:

Background: Stressful life events as important stressors have gradually been recognized as the potential etiology that may lead to adverse birth outcomes such as preterm birth (PTB), low birth weight (LBW), and small for gestational age (SGA). However, researches on this topic have shown relatively inconsistent results. This systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to synthesize available data on the association between prenatal stressful life events and increased risks of PTB, LBW, and SGA.

Methods: Electronic databases were searched from their inception until September 2020. Pooled relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to assess the association between prenatal stressful life events and PTB, LBW, and SGA using random effects models. In addition, subgroup analyses, cumulative meta-analyses, sensitivity analyses, and publication bias diagnosis were conducted. STATA 14.0 was applied for statistical analyses.

Results: Totally 31 cohort studies involving 5,665,998 pregnant women were included. Prenatal stressful life events were associated with a 20% higher risk of PTB (RR = 1.20, 95%CI = 1.10-1.32), a 23% increased risk for LBW (RR = 1.23, 95%CI = 1.10-1.39), and a 14% higher risk of SGA (RR = 1.14, 95%CI = 1.08-1.20). Sensitivity analysis indicated the results were stable.

Conclusions: Findings indicated that pregnant women experiencing prenatal stressful life events were at increased risk of PTB, LBW, and SGA. This information provided additional supports that pregnant women experiencing prenatal stressful life events would benefit from receiving assessment and management in prenatal care services.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2021.03.083DOI Listing
May 2021

Aspirin Use and Risk of Breast Cancer: A Meta-analysis of Observational Studies from 1989 to 2019.

Clin Breast Cancer 2021 Dec 17;21(6):552-565. Epub 2021 Feb 17.

Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, Anhui, China; Center for Evidence-Based Practice, Anhui Medical University, Anhui, China. Electronic address:

Background: Some evidence shows that aspirin can reduce the morbidity and mortality of different cancers, including breast cancer. Aspirin has become a new focus of cancer prevention and treatment research at present, however, clinical studies found conflicting conclusions of its anticancer characteristics.

Materials And Methods: A systematic literature search was performed in 8 electronic databases. The pooled relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated using the random effects model to estimate the effect of aspirin on breast cancer.

Results: Forty-two published articles with 99,769 patients were identified. The meta-analysis showed a significant decrease in breast cancer risk with aspirin use (RR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.89-0.96; I = 72%). Aspirin use decreased the risk of hormone receptor-positive tumors (estrogen receptor [ER]-positive RR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.82-0.97; I=54%; progesterone receptor [PR]-positive RR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.78-0.95; I=32%; ER- and PR-positive RR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.85-1.00; I=45%) and reduced the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women (RR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.86-0.98; I=59%). Further analysis showed that for the in situ breast cancer, regular-dose and more than 3 years use of aspirin were associated with the reduced risk of breast cancer.

Conclusion: This meta-analysis suggested that aspirin may reduce the overall risk of breast cancer, reduce the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women, hormone receptor-positive tumors, and in situ breast cancer. Larger, multicenter clinical studies are needed to find the optimal dose range, frequency, and duration of the aspirin use to explore the best benefit-risk ratio.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clbc.2021.02.005DOI Listing
December 2021

Association of smoking history with severe and critical outcomes in COVID-19 patients: A systemic review and meta-analysis.

Eur J Integr Med 2021 Apr 18;43:101313. Epub 2021 Feb 18.

AMITA Health Saint Joseph Hospital Chicago, 2900 N. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago 60657, Illinois, USA.

Introduction: The highly infectious coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has now rapidly spread around the world. This meta-analysis was strictly focused on the influence of smoking history on the severe and critical outcomes on people with COVID-19 pneumonia.

Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in eight online databases before 1 February 2021. All studies meeting our selection criteria were included and evaluated. Stata 14.0 software was used to analyze the data.

Results: A total of 109 articles involving 517,020 patients were included in this meta-analysis. A statistically significant association was discovered between smoking history and COVID-19 severity, the pooled OR was 1.55 (95%CI: 1.41-1.71). Smoking was significantly associated with the risk of admission to intensive care unit (ICU) (OR=1.73, 95%CI: 1.36-2.19), increased mortality (OR=1.58, 95%CI: 1.38-1.81), and critical diseases composite endpoints (OR=1.61, 95%CI: 1.35-1.93), whereas there was no relationship with mechanical ventilation. The pooled prevalence of smoking using the random effects model (REM) was 15% (95%CI: 14%-16%). Meta-regression analysis showed that age (0.004), hypertension (=0.007), diabetes (=0.029), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (=0.001) were covariates that affect the association.

Conclusions: Smoking was associated with severe or critical outcomes and increased the risk of admission to ICU and mortality in COVID-19 patients, but not associated with mechanical ventilation. This association was more significant for former smokers than in current smokers. Current smokers also had a higher risk of developing severe COVID-19 compared with non-smokers. More detailed data, which are representative of more countries, are needed to confirm these preliminary findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eujim.2021.101313DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7889467PMC
April 2021

Does aspirin reduce the incidence, recurrence, and mortality of colorectal cancer? A meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

Int J Colorectal Dis 2021 Aug 16;36(8):1653-1666. Epub 2021 Feb 16.

Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA.

Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common diagnosed cancer and the third leading cause of all cancer deaths in the USA. Some evidences are shown that aspirin can reduce the morbidity and mortality of different cancers, including CRC. Aspirin has become a new focus of cancer prevention and treatment research so far; clinical studies, however, found conflicting conclusions of its anti-cancer characteristics. This study is to summarize the latest evidence of correlation between aspirin use and CRC and/or colorectal adenomas.

Methods: Databases were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in the salvage setting. The pooled relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was used to estimate the effect of aspirin on colorectal cancer and/or colorectal adenomas. Subgroup analysis and sensitivity analysis were also conducted.

Results: The result showed that aspirin use was not associated with incidence of CRC (RR 0.97; 95% CI 0.84-1.12; P = 0.66; I = 34%), aspirin use was found to be associated with reduced recurrence of colorectal adenomas (RR 0.83; 95% CI 0.72-0.95; P = 0.006; I = 63%) and reduced mortality of CRC (RR 0.79; 95% CI 0.64-0.97; P = 0.02; I = 14%). Subgroup analysis found a statistically significant association in low dose with a pooled RR of 0.85 (95% CI 0.74-0.99; P = 0.03; I = 31%).

Conclusions: This meta-analysis of randomized controlled trial data indicates that aspirin reduces the overall risk of recurrence and mortality of CRC and/or colorectal adenomas. Incidence of CRC was also reduced with low-dose aspirin. The emerging evidence on aspirin's cancer protection role highlights an exciting time for cancer prevention through low-cost interventions.

Trial Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov no: CRD42020208852; August 18, 2020; https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/display_record.php?ID=CRD42020208852 ).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00384-021-03889-8DOI Listing
August 2021

Does aspirin reduce the incidence, recurrence, and mortality of colorectal cancer? A meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

Int J Colorectal Dis 2021 Aug 16;36(8):1653-1666. Epub 2021 Feb 16.

Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA.

Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common diagnosed cancer and the third leading cause of all cancer deaths in the USA. Some evidences are shown that aspirin can reduce the morbidity and mortality of different cancers, including CRC. Aspirin has become a new focus of cancer prevention and treatment research so far; clinical studies, however, found conflicting conclusions of its anti-cancer characteristics. This study is to summarize the latest evidence of correlation between aspirin use and CRC and/or colorectal adenomas.

Methods: Databases were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in the salvage setting. The pooled relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was used to estimate the effect of aspirin on colorectal cancer and/or colorectal adenomas. Subgroup analysis and sensitivity analysis were also conducted.

Results: The result showed that aspirin use was not associated with incidence of CRC (RR 0.97; 95% CI 0.84-1.12; P = 0.66; I = 34%), aspirin use was found to be associated with reduced recurrence of colorectal adenomas (RR 0.83; 95% CI 0.72-0.95; P = 0.006; I = 63%) and reduced mortality of CRC (RR 0.79; 95% CI 0.64-0.97; P = 0.02; I = 14%). Subgroup analysis found a statistically significant association in low dose with a pooled RR of 0.85 (95% CI 0.74-0.99; P = 0.03; I = 31%).

Conclusions: This meta-analysis of randomized controlled trial data indicates that aspirin reduces the overall risk of recurrence and mortality of CRC and/or colorectal adenomas. Incidence of CRC was also reduced with low-dose aspirin. The emerging evidence on aspirin's cancer protection role highlights an exciting time for cancer prevention through low-cost interventions.

Trial Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov no: CRD42020208852; August 18, 2020; https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/display_record.php?ID=CRD42020208852 ).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00384-021-03889-8DOI Listing
August 2021
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