Publications by authors named "Shangkui Xie"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

ZIMIR Imaging of Mouse Pancreatic Islet Cells Shows Oscillatory Insulin Secretion.

Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) 2021 9;12:613964. Epub 2021 Mar 9.

Departments of Cell Biology and of Biochemistry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical, Dallas, TX, United States.

Appropriate insulin secretion is essential for maintaining euglycemia, and impairment or loss of insulin release represents a causal event leading to diabetes. There have been extensive efforts of studying insulin secretion and its regulation using a variety of biological preparations, yet it remains challenging to monitor the dynamics of insulin secretion at the cellular level in the intact pancreas of living animals, where islet cells are supplied with physiological blood circulation and oxygenation, nerve innervation, and tissue support of surrounding exocrine cells. Herein we presented our pilot efforts of ZIMIR imaging in pancreatic islet cells in a living mouse. The imaging tracked insulin/Zn release of individual islet β-cells in the intact pancreas with high spatiotemporal resolution, revealing a rhythmic secretion activity that appeared to be synchronized among islet β-cells. To facilitate probe delivery to islet cells, we also developed a chemogenetic approach by expressing the HaloTag protein on the cell surface. Finally, we demonstrated the application of a fluorescent granule zinc indicator, ZIGIR, as a selective and efficient islet cell marker in living animals through systemic delivery. We expect future optimization and integration of these approaches would enable longitudinal tracking of beta cell mass and function by optical imaging.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fendo.2021.613964DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7985533PMC
March 2021

Linc01194 acts as an oncogene in colorectal carcinoma and is associated with poor survival outcome.

Cancer Manag Res 2019 22;11:2349-2362. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

Department of Proctology, The Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China,

Background: The incidence of colorectal cancer ranks among the top three malignant tumors, attributing to more than 50,000 deaths in the United States every year. Survival rate is directly correlated with TNM stage at diagnosis, and identifying the molecules involved in the cancer development process will provide directions to better investigate the mechanisms of colorectal cancer.

Materials And Methods: Bioinformatics analysis of differentially expressed long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), survival analysis, cell proliferation assay, migration assay, and Western blot analysis were performed.

Results: Fifty-one lncRNAs were identified between the early stage and late-stage groups. In the survival analysis, we found that Linc01194 is correlated with poor survival of colon cancer patients. In addition, by suppressing the expression of Linc01194 in colon cancer cell lines, cell proliferation and migration were inhibited. Western blot showed that N-cadherin and vimentin were downregulated, whereas E-cadherin was upregulated indicating that the process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) was restrained.

Conclusion: promotes the proliferation and migration ability of colon cancer cells by activating EMT. It acts as an oncogene in colorectal carcinoma and is associated with worse survival outcome.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CMAR.S189189DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6434913PMC
March 2019

[Three methods for controlling presacral massive bleeding during pelvic operations].

Zhonghua Wei Chang Wai Ke Za Zhi 2017 Dec;20(12):1414-1416

Department of Surgery, 157 Branch Hospital, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou 510510, China.

Objective: To evaluate three different methods for controlling presacral massive bleeding during pelvic operations.

Methods: Clinical data of 11 patients with presacral massive bleeding during pelvic operation at The Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University and 157 Branch Hospital of Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command from January 2001 to January 2016 were analyzed retrospectively. Hemostasis methods for presacral massive bleeding during operation included gauze packing (whole pressure), drawing pin (local pressure) and absorbable gauze (absorbable gauze was adhered to bleeding position with medical glue after local pressure). Efficacy of these 3 methods for controlling bleeding was evaluated and compared.

Results: Ten patients were male and 1 was female with average age of 65.2 (40 to 79) years old. Eight cases were rectal cancer, 2 were presacral malignancies and 1 was rectal benign lesion. Bleeding volume during operation was 300 to 2 500 (median 800) ml. From 2001 to 2012, 4 cases received gauze packing, of whom, 3 cases were scheduled Dixon resection before operation and then had to be referred to Hartman resection; 3 cases died of systemic failure due to postoperative chronic errhysis and infection, and 1 underwent re-operation. At the same time from 2001 to 2012, 5 cases received drawing pin, of whom, bleeding of 3 cases was successfully controlled and Dixon resection was completed. In other 2 cases with hemostasis failure, 1 case underwent re-operation following the use of gauze packing, and another 1 case received absorbable gauze hemostasis. All the 5 patients were healing. From 2013 to 2016, 2 cases completed scheduled anterior resection of rectum after successful hemostasis with absorbable gauze and were healing and discharged.

Conclusions: Gauze packing hemostasis is a basic method for controlling presacral massive bleeding. Drawing pin and absorbable gauze hemostasis are more precise and may avoid the change of surgical procedure. But drawing pin has the possibility of hemostasis failure. Absorbable gauze hemostasis with medical adhesive is effective, simple and fast.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 2017

17β-Estradiol Dysregulates Innate Immune Responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Respiratory Infection and Is Modulated by Estrogen Receptor Antagonism.

Infect Immun 2017 10 20;85(10). Epub 2017 Sep 20.

Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA

Females have a more severe clinical course than males in terms of several inflammatory lung conditions. Notably, females with cystic fibrosis (CF) suffer worse outcomes, particularly in the setting of infection. Sex hormones have been implicated in experimental and clinical studies; however, immune mechanisms responsible for this sex-based disparity are unknown and the specific sex hormone target for therapeutic manipulation has not been identified. The objective of this study was to assess mechanisms behind the impact of female sex hormones on host immune responses to We used wild-type and CF mice, which we hormone manipulated, inoculated with , and then examined for outcomes and inflammatory responses. Neutrophils isolated from mice and human subjects were tested for responses to We found that female mice inoculated with died earlier and showed slower bacterial clearance than males ( < 0.0001). Ovariectomized females supplemented with 17β-estradiol succumbed to challenge earlier than progesterone- or vehicle-supplemented mice ( = 0.0003). 17β-Estradiol-treated ovariectomized female mice demonstrated increased lung levels of inflammatory cytokines, and when rendered neutropenic the mortality difference was abrogated. Neutrophils treated with 17β-estradiol demonstrated an enhanced oxidative burst but decreased killing and earlier cell necrosis. The estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist ICI 182,780 improved survival in female mice infected with and restored neutrophil function. We concluded that ER antagonism rescues estrogen-mediated neutrophil dysfunction and improves survival in response to ER-mediated processes may explain the sex-based mortality gap in CF and other inflammatory lung illnesses, and the ER blockade represents a rational therapeutic strategy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/IAI.00422-17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5607430PMC
October 2017

Strain distribution pattern of immune nephritis--a follow-up study.

Int Immunol 2008 Jun 1;20(6):719-28. Epub 2008 Apr 1.

Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390, USA.

Previous studies have indicated that the NZW, DBA/1, 129/sv and BUB strains are particularly sensitive to experimental anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM)-induced immune nephritis. The present study extends previous observations by examining eight additional inbred mouse strains for their susceptibility to immune nephritis. Unlike the ALR/Lt, CAST/Ei, DDY/JclSidSeyFrk, FVB/NJ, PERA/Ei, SB/Le and BALB/c strains, the C58 mouse strain was observed to be particularly susceptible to experimental immune nephritis, with CBA mice being a close second. In contrast to the other strains, C58 mice uniformly developed heavy proteinuria, azotemia and severe glomerulonephritis with prominent crescent formation and tubulointerstitial nephritis following challenge with anti-GBM sera. These differences were associated with increased murine Ig deposition, leukocyte infiltration and IFN-gamma production within the kidneys of C58 mice. Studies aimed at elucidating the genetic factors and molecular pathways responsible for the enhanced renal disease in C58 mice are warranted.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/intimm/dxn030DOI Listing
June 2008

Genetic origin of lupus in NZB/SWR hybrids: lessons from an intercross study.

Arthritis Rheum 2005 Feb;52(2):659-67

Simmons Arthritis Research Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas 75390-8884, USA.

Objective: (SWR x NZB)F(1) (or SNF(1)) hybrid mice succumb to lupus nephritis. A previous analysis of SNF(1) x NZB backcross mice revealed the existence of 4 SWR loci (H2 on chromosome 17, Swrl-1 on chromosome 1, Swrl-2 on chromosome 14, and Swrl-3 on chromosome 18) and 2 NZB loci (Nba1 and Lbw2/Sbw2, both on chromosome 4). A second study focusing on SNF(1) x SWR backcross offspring uncovered 5 suggestive loci for antinuclear antibody formation, consisting of 3 dominant NZB contributions (Nba4 on chromosome 5, Lbw4 on chromosome 6, and Nba5 on chromosome 7) and 2 recessive SWR contributions (Swrl-1 on chromosome 1 and Swrl-4 on chromosome 10). The present intercross study was executed to replicate the earlier findings, using an independent panel of (SWR x NZB)F(2) offspring.

Methods: A panel of (NZB x SWR)F(2) hybrids were phenotyped (for renal disease, early mortality, and a variety of autoantibodies) and genotyped (using 95 microsatellite primers positioned across all 19 autosomes and the X chromosome). Linkage analysis was conducted using the derived phenotype and genotype data, with the interval-mapping program MapManager.

Results: Four suggestive loci were mapped: Swrl-5 on chromosome 1 (peak at 106 cM), linked to hypergammaglobulinemia; an NZB locus on chromosome 5 (Nba4; peak at 15 cM), linked to IgG anti-single-stranded DNA (anti-ssDNA) antibodies, IgG anti-doubled-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibodies, and glomerulonephritis; an NZB locus on chromosome 13 (Nba6; peak at 28 cM), linked to IgG anti-dsDNA antibodies; and an SWR locus on chromosome 14 (Swrl-2; peak at 30 cM), linked to IgG anti-ssDNA antibodies. Eight additional loci revealed linkage at P < 0.01, of which 7 co-mapped with lupus susceptibility loci previously identified in other models.

Conclusion: Considering all 3 mapping studies together, lupus in SWR/NZB hybrids appears to be the epistatic end product of several distinct loci, of which 3 SWR-derived loci (Swrl-1, Swrl-2, and Swrl-3) and 5 NZB-derived loci (Nba1, Nba3, Nba4, Nba5, and Lbw4) have been independently confirmed. The immunologic functions and molecular identities of these loci await elucidation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.20786DOI Listing
February 2005

Divide and conquer--the power of congenic strains.

Clin Immunol 2004 Feb;110(2):109-11

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clim.2003.09.007DOI Listing
February 2004