Publications by authors named "Shan Sainudeen"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Can Herbal Extracts Serve as Antibacterial Root Canal Irrigating Solutions? Antimicrobial Efficacy of , , , and Sodium Hypochlorite on Biofilms Formed on Tooth Substrate: Study.

J Pharm Bioallied Sci 2020 Aug 28;12(Suppl 1):S423-S429. Epub 2020 Aug 28.

Department of Pedodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Asian Institute of Medical Science and Technology University, Bedong, Malaysia.

Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of , , and on biofilms formed on the tooth substrate. Sodium hypochlorite was used as a positive control. DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide), the vehicle for the herbal extracts, was used as the negative control.

Materials And Methods: Extracted human teeth were biomechanically prepared, vertically sectioned, placed in the tissue culture wells exposing the root canal surface to to form a biofilm. At the end of the third week, all groups were treated for 15 min with the test solutions and the control. The results were analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively.

Results: Statistical analysis was performed by using one-way analysis of variance and compared by the Mann-Whitney test using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software, version 20.0. The qualitative assay with the 3-week biofilm on the canal portion showed complete inhibition of bacterial growth for NaOCl, whereas samples treated with herbal solutions showed significant reduction of bacterial growth compared to control group, which showed 139.9 × 10 CFU/mL among the experimental herbal solutions groups. has shown maximum bacterial count followed by and .

Conclusion: NaOCl 5% showed maximum antibacterial activity against 3-week biofilm on tooth substrate. , , and showed statistically significant antibacterial activity against 3-week biofilm. The use of herbal alternatives might prove to be advantageous considering the several undesirable characteristics of NaOCl.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/jpbs.JPBS_127_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7595561PMC
August 2020

Prosthodontic Management of a Pediatric Patient with Christ-Siemens-Touraine Syndrome: A Case Report.

Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2019 Nov-Dec;12(6):569-572

Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontic Sciences, King Khalid University, Abha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Ectodermal dysplasias (ED) are a group of rare genetic disorders characterized by congenital defects involving two or more ectodermal structures. Christ-Siemens-Touraine syndrome or hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia is the commonest form of ED. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is an X-linked disorder characterized by excessively dry skin due to the absence of sweat glands (anhidrosis), sparse body hair especially on the scalp and eyebrows (hypotrichosis), brittle nails, absence of sebaceous glands (asteatosis) and malformed or absent teeth. Oral manifestations include oligodontia or complete anodontia, conical teeth, underdeveloped alveolar ridges, generalized spacing and delayed eruption of permanent teeth. This case report discusses a classical case of HED and the options for rehabilitation in a growing patient. A thorough knowledge about the clinical manifestations of ED will lead to proper diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan thereby leading to significant improvements in esthetics, phonetics and masticatory function in ED patients, which in turn leads to improved quality of life in these individuals.

How To Cite This Article: Abdulla AM, Almaliki AY, Shakeela NV, Prosthodontic Management of a Pediatric Patient with Christ-Siemens-Touraine Syndrome: A Case Report. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2019;12(6):569-572.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5005/jp-journals-10005-1697DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7229389PMC
May 2020

An Comparative Evaluation of Volume of Removed Dentin, Canal Transportation, and Centering Ratio of 2Shape, WaveOne Gold, and ProTaper Gold Files Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography.

J Int Soc Prev Community Dent 2019 Sep-Oct;9(5):481-485. Epub 2019 Sep 30.

Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, MES Dental College, Perinthalmanna, Kerala, India.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the shaping ability of three file systems - 2Shape (2S), WaveOne Gold (WOG), and ProTaper Gold - using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT).

Materials And  Methods: Forty-five freshly extracted mandibular teeth were chosen and instrumented using the following brands of NiTi files: 2S, WOG, and ProTaper Gold. Pre- and post-instrumentation CBCT imaging was performed to measure mesial and distal distance of the dentin walls and calculate the volume of removed dentin, apical transportation, and centering ratio. A statistical analysis of the data was performed using independent -test. Statistical significance was set at 5%.

Results: There were no significant differences between the 2S and WOG in terms of the total volume of removed dentin, apical transportation, and centering ratio, whereas ProTaper showed a greater significant difference when compared to 2S and WOG.

Conclusion: Both 2S and WOG maintained the original canal anatomy better and did not remove excess dentin while chemomechanical preparation as compared to ProTaper Gold. Instruments that use rotary movement achieved an effect similar to that of the reciprocating instruments in relation to change in angle. 2S which is a two-file system and WOG which is a single-file system might perform better clinically and might show enhanced shaping ability with less canal transportation and more centered preparation when compared to ProTaper Gold that is a multiple file-system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/jispcd.JISPCD_444_18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6792313PMC
September 2019

Shaping Ability of 2Shape and WaveOne Gold Files Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography.

J Int Soc Prev Community Dent 2019 May-Jun;9(3):245-249. Epub 2019 Jun 7.

Department of Restorative Dentistry, College of Dentistry, King Khalid University, Abha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Aim And Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the apical transportation, centering ability, and volume of removed dentin of WaveOne Gold (WOG) and 2Shape with the use of cone-beam computed tomography.

Materials And Methods: Freshly extracted mandibular teeth with sample size of thirty were carefully chosen and instrumented using the 2Shape and WOG rotary files. Preoperative and postinstrumentation cone-beam computed tomographic scans were done to accomplish mesial and distal dentin walls' measurements and volume of removed dentin calculations, apical transportation, and centering ratio. Statistical analysis was performed and confirmed by independent -test. Statistical significance was set at 5%.

Results: When shaping ability of 2Shape and WOG was evaluated, it was reported that there was no statistically significant differences noted among the groups in relation to the total volume of removed dentin, apical transportation, and centering ratio.

Conclusion: It can be concluded that 2Shape and WOG preserved the original canal anatomy well and did not eliminate excess dentin during shaping and cleaning. Rotary nickel-titanium files which work on the principle of rotary movement attained an outcome analogous to that of the rotary files working on reciprocating motion in relation to alteration in angle.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/jispcd.JISPCD_411_18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6559050PMC
June 2019

A Comparative Evaluation of Five Obturation Techniques in the Management of Simulated Internal Resorptive Cavities: An Study.

J Pharm Bioallied Sci 2019 May;11(Suppl 2):S450-S456

Department of Preventive Dental Science, College of Dentistry, King Khalid University, Abha, Saudi Arabia.

Background: Root resorption is the loss of dental hard tissues as a result of clastic activities. It might be broadly classified into external or internal resorption by the location of the resorption in relation to the root surface. the various techniques used these days for filling internal resorption include warm condensation, vertical condensation, core techniques, thermoplasticized gutta-percha, warm vertical compaction, and cold lateral condensation.

Objectives: The aims and objectives of this study were to compare the quality of root fillings in artificially created internal resorption cavities filled with warm vertical compaction, lateral condensation, Obtura II along with System B, E and Q plus along with System B, and Thermafil, and to calculate the percentage of gutta-percha, sealer, and voids using an ImageJ software.

Results: Results between the warm vertical compaction (group I), lateral condensation (group II), Obtura II with System B (group III), E and Q plus with System B (group IV), and Thermafil (group V), group III showed the highest percentage of gutta-percha plus sealer and gutta-percha, and least number of voids, which was statistically significant ( < 0.000).

Conclusion: It can be concluded that Obtura II along with System B was found to be the most suitable obturation technique for the management of teeth exhibiting internal resorption. Thermafil was found to give the poorest obturation quality when used to fill the teeth with internal resorption. Similarly, lateral condensation technique was observed to show maximum sealer and hence was not ideal for the management of internal resorptive cavities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/JPBS.JPBS_75_19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6555363PMC
May 2019

Levels of Mercury in Fish-Eating Children, With and Without Amalgam Restoration.

J Pharm Bioallied Sci 2019 May;11(Suppl 2):S397-S401

Department of Oral Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry, Asian Institute of Medicine, Science and Technology (AIMST) University, Kedah, Malaysia.

Background: Mercury is a naturally occurring metal that exists in three forms: elemental (metallic), inorganic, and organic mercury. Amalgam, which is an alloy of inorganic mercury, is used as a restorative material in dentistry. Organic mercury gets ingested in the body mainly by the consumption of seafood. Mercury is also stated to cause various adverse health effects such as gastrointestinal disturbances, dermatitis, muscle weakness, and neurological disorders. In recent years, the use of amalgam has become a controversy stating the various adverse effects of mercury. Hence, the study was conducted to determine and compare the variation in levels of organic and inorganic mercury in fish-eating children before and after placement of amalgam restoration.

Materials And Methods: Seventy-five subjects, 42 males (56%) and 35 females (44%) of age group ranging 7-13 years, living in South Canara district of Karnataka, India, were selected as a part of the study. Hair and urine samples were collected for estimation of organic and inorganic levels of mercury, respectively. Informed consent was collected from all the participating subjects.

Results: On comparison between organic and inorganic mercury levels during the study period, the concentration of organic mercury in hair samples was greater irrespective of amalgam restorations present (1.172 and 0.085, respectively; < 0.001).

Conclusion: Thus inorganic levels of mercury do not seem to pose a threat as much as the organic levels observed in hair, which remain fairly constant for a longer period of time. Hence in a coastal region where this study was undertaken and fish being a staple food, the risk could probably be attributed to more of an organic toxicity than an inorganic one. Thus amalgam is relatively safe to be practiced and the controversy against it should be reevaluated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/JPBS.JPBS_44_19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6555354PMC
May 2019

Resistance to torsional failure and cyclic fatigue resistance of ProTaper Next, WaveOne, and Mtwo files in continuous and reciprocating motion: An in vitro study.

J Conserv Dent 2016 May-Jun;19(3):225-30

Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, PMS College of Dental Science and Research, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India.

Aims: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the resistance to torsional failure and cyclic fatigue resistance of ProTaper Next (PTN), WaveOne, and Mtwo files in continuous and reciprocating motion.

Settings And Design: Randomized control trial in a tertiary care setting.

Subjects And Methods: A total of 10 new size 25.06 taper PTN X2, 25.06 taper Mtwo files, and 25.08 taper WaveOne primary files each was selected. A custom fabricated cyclic fatigue testing device with a 70° angle of curvature and 3 mm width; curvature starting at 6 mm from the tip was used. All instruments were rotated and reciprocated till fracture occurred and time till fracture of each instrument was recorded in seconds. For torsional failure testing 5 mm tip of each file was embedded in composite resin block and uniform torsional stresses (300 rpm, 2.0 Ncm) were applied repetitively by an endodontic motor with auto stop mode until file succumbed to torsional failure. Number of load applications leading to failure was recorded.

Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed using t-test for equality of means, Pearson correlation, and ANOVA test.

Results: All the files showed superior resistance to cyclic fatigue in reciprocating motion when compared with continuous rotation mode. WaveOne primary files displayed maximum resistance to cyclic fatigue both in continuous and reciprocating motion. WaveOne primary files also demonstrated maximum resistance to torsional failure followed by PTN with Mtwo files exhibiting least resistance.

Conclusions: Operating files in reciprocating motion enhances their cyclic fatigue resistance. WaveOne files showed maximum resistance to cyclic fatigue and torsional failure due to their cross-sectional diameter coupled M-Wire technology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0972-0707.181937DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4872575PMC
May 2016

Three-dimensional evaluation of surface roughness of resin composites after finishing and polishing.

J Conserv Dent 2016 Jan-Feb;19(1):91-5

Department of Cons and Endo Cos and Endo, PMS Dental College, Golden Hills, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India.

Aim: This study aims to investigate the effects of finishing and polishing procedures on four novel resin composites using three-dimensional optical profilometer.

Materials And Methods: Four composites classified according to their filler size, were selected: Filtek™ Z350 XT/Nanofill (3M™ ESPE™), Esthet-X HD/Hybrid (Dentsply Caulk), Te Econom/Microfill (Ivoclar Vivadent(®)), Tetric EvoCeram(®) /Nanohybrid (Ivoclar Vivadent(®)). Composite specimens were made in Plexiglass mold and polished with Soflex (3M ESPE), Enhance + Pogo (Dentsply Caulk). Both the systems were used according to the manufacturers' instructions, and the polished surfaces were assessed with an optical profilometer.

Statistical Analysis Used: Kruskal-Wallis test and further pairwise comparison were performed by Mann-Whitney test.

Results: The smoothest surfaces for all the resin composites tested were obtained from the Mylar strip; statistically significant differences were observed among them (P = 0.001). The order of composites was ranked from the lowest to highest surface roughness; Filtek Z350 XT < Te Econom < Tetric EvoCeram < Esthet XHD. Pairwise multiple comparison with Mann-Whitney test showed Filtek Z350 to have the smoothest surface and the least with Teric EvoCeram. Among the polishing systems, Soflex showed the smoothest surface and was significantly different from Pogo (P = 0.046).

Conclusions: The effectiveness of the polishing systems seems to be dependent on the material used, treatment modality and also on the filler particle size.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0972-0707.173208DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4760024PMC
March 2016
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