Publications by authors named "Shams Ribault"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Comparison of clinical outcomes and accuracy of electrode placement between robot-assisted and conventional deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus: a single-center study.

Acta Neurochir (Wien) 2021 Mar 2. Epub 2021 Mar 2.

Service de Neurologie C, Centre Expert Parkinson, Hôpital Neurologique et Neurochirurgical Pierre Wertheimer, Hospices Civils de Lyon, 69003, Lyon, France.

Background: Several surgical methods are used for deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in Parkinson's disease (PD). This study aimed to compare clinical outcomes and electrode placement accuracy after robot-assisted (RAS) versus frame-based stereotactic (FSS) STN DBS in Parkinson's disease.

Methods: In this single-center open-label study, we prospectively collected data from 48 consecutive PD patients who underwent RAS (Neuromate®; n = 20) or FSS (n = 28) STN DBS with the same MRI-based STN targeting between October 2016 and December 2018 in the university neurological hospital of Lyon, France. Clinical variables were assessed before and 1 year after surgery. The number of electrode contacts within the STN was determined by merging post-operative CT and pre-operative MRI using Brainlab® GUIDE™XT software.

Results: One year after surgery, the improvement of motor manifestations (p = 0.18), motor complications (p = 0.80), and quality of life (p= 0.30) and the reduction of dopaminergic treatment (p = 0.94) and the rate of complications (p = 0.99) were similar in the two groups. Surgery duration was longer in the RAS group (p = 0.0001). There was no difference in the number of electrode contacts within the STN.

Conclusion: This study demonstrates that RAS and FSS STN DBS for PD provide similar clinical outcomes and accuracy of electrode placement.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00701-021-04790-7DOI Listing
March 2021

Limited evidence of physical therapy on balance after stroke: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

PLoS One 2019 29;14(8):e0221700. Epub 2019 Aug 29.

Service de médecine physique et réadaptation, hôpital Henry Gabrielle, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Saint-Genis-Laval, France.

Background: Stroke results in balance disorders and these directly affect autonomy and quality of life. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine the efficacy of physical therapy (PT) on balance and postural control after stroke.

Methods: We included all randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of PT on balance and postural control in adult patients after stroke without language restriction. Medline, Embase/Scopus, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PEDro, Pascal, and Francis databases were searched until January 2019. Primary outcomes were balance (Berg Balance scale and Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke) and postural control with postural deviation or stability measurement in sitting or standing static evaluation. A pair of independent reviewers selected studies, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. Meta-analyses with subgroups (categories of PT, time post-stroke, and lesion location) and meta-regression (duration of PT) were conducted.

Results: A total of 145 studies (n = 5912) were selected from the 13,123 records identified. For balance, evidence was found in favor of the efficacy of functional task-training alone (standardized mean difference 0.39, 95% confidence interval [0.09; 0.68], heterogeneity I2 = 63%) or associated with musculoskeletal intervention and/or cardiopulmonary intervention (0.37, [0.19; 0.55], I2 = 48%), electrostimulation (0.91, [0.49; 1.34], I2 = 52%) immediately after intervention, compared to sham treatment or usual care (ST/UC). For postural deviation eyes open, assistive devices were more effective than no treatment (-0.21, [-0.37; -0.05], I2 = 0%) immediately after intervention; for postural stability eyes open, functional task-training and sensory interventions were more effective than ST/UC (0.97, [0.35; 1.59], I2 = 65% and 0.80, [0.46; 1.13], I2 = 37% respectively) immediately after intervention.

Conclusions: Functional task-training associated with musculoskeletal intervention and/or cardiopulmonary intervention and sensory interventions seem to be immediately effective in improving balance and postural stability, respectively. The heterogeneity of PT and the weak methodological quality of studies limited the interpretation and the confidence in findings.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0221700PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6715189PMC
March 2020

GLUcose COntrol Safety & Efficacy in type 2 DIabetes, a systematic review and NETwork meta-analysis.

PLoS One 2019 25;14(6):e0217701. Epub 2019 Jun 25.

Service de Pharmacotoxicologie, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France.

Background: The last international consensus on the management of type 2 diabetes (T2D) recommends SGLT-2 inhibitors or GLP-1 agonists for patients with clinical cardiovascular (CV) disease; metformin remains the first-line glucose lowering medication. Last studies suggested beneficial effects of SGLT-2 inhibitors or GLP-1 agonists compared to DPP-4 inhibitors, in secondary CV prevention. Recently, a potential benefit of SGLT-2 inhibitors in primary CV prevention also has been suggested. However, no comparison of all the new and the old hypoglycemic drugs is available on CV outcomes. We aimed to compare the effects of old and new hypoglycemic drugs in T2D, on major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and mortality.

Methods And Findings: We conducted a systematic review and network meta-analysis of clinical trials. Randomized trials, blinded or not, assessing contemporary hypoglycemic drugs on mortality or MACE in patients with T2D, were searched for in Medline, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and ClinicalTrials.gov. References screening and data extraction were done by multiple observers. Each drug was analyzed according to its therapeutic class. A random Bayesian network meta-analysis model was used. The primary outcomes were overall mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and MACE. Severe adverse events and severe hypoglycemia were also recorded. 175,966 patients in 34 trials from 1970 to 2018 were included. No trials evaluating glinides or alpha glucosidase inhibitors were found. 17 trials included a majority of patients with previous cardiovascular history, 16 trials a majority of patients without. Compared to control, SGLT-2 inhibitors were associated with a decreased risk of overall mortality (OR = 0.84 [95% CrI: 0.74; 0.95]), SGLT-2 inhibitors and GLP-1 agonists with a decreased risk of MACE (OR = 0.89 [95% CrI: 0.81; 0.98] and OR = 0.88 [95% CrI: 0.81; 0.95], respectively). Compared to DPP-4 inhibitors, SGLT-2 inhibitors were associated with a decreased risk of overall mortality (OR = 0.82 [95% CrI: 0.69; 0.98]), GLP-1 agonists with a decreased risk of MACE (OR = 0.88 [95% CrI: 0.79; 0.99]). Insulin was also associated with an increased risk of MACE compared to GLP-1 agonists (OR = 1.19 [95% CrI: 1.01; 1.42]). Insulin and sulfonylureas were associated with an increased risk of severe hypoglycemia. In the trials including a majority of patients without previous CV history, the comparisons of SGLT-2 inhibitors, metformin and control did not showed significant differences on primary outcomes. We limited our analysis at the therapeutic class level.

Conclusions: SGLT-2 inhibitors and GLP-1 agonists have the most beneficial effects, especially in T2D patients with previous CV diseases. Direct comparisons of SGLT-2 inhibitors, GLP-1 agonists and metformin are needed, notably in primary CV prevention.

Trial Registration: PROSPERO CRD42016043823.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0217701PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6592598PMC
February 2020

Protocol of GLUcose COntrol Safety and Efficacy in type 2 DIabetes, a NETwork meta-analysis: GLUCOSE DINET protocol-Rational and design.

Fundam Clin Pharmacol 2017 Jun 23;31(3):258-264. Epub 2017 Mar 23.

Hospices Civils de Lyon, Service de Pharmacologie Clinique et Essais Thérapeutiques, BP8071, 69376, Lyon, France.

The aim of this study was to propose a ranking of the currently available antidiabetic drugs, regarding vascular clinical outcomes, in patients with type 2 diabetes, through a network meta-analysis approach. Randomized clinical trials, regardless of the blinding design, testing contemporary antidiabetic drugs, and considering clinically relevant outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus will be included. The primary outcomes of this analysis will be overall mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and major cardiovascular events. Diabetic microangiopathy will be a secondary outcome. Adverse events, hypoglycemia, weight evolution, bariatric surgery, and discontinuation of the treatment will also be recorded. Each drug will be analyzed according to its therapeutic class: biguanide, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, sulfonylureas, glitazones, glinides, insulin, DPP-4 inhibitors, GLP-1 analogs, and gliflozins. The treatment effect of each drug class will be compared using pairwise meta-analysis and a Bayesian random model network meta-analysis. Sensitivity analyses will be conducted according to the quality of the studies and the glycemic control. The report will follow the PRISMA checklist for network meta-analysis. Results of the search strategy and of the study selection will be presented in a PRISMA compliant flowchart. The treatment effects will be summarized with odds ratio (OR) estimates and their 95% credible intervals. A ranking of the drugs will be proposed. Our network meta-analysis should allow a clinically relevant ranking of the contemporary antidiabetic drugs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/fcp.12263DOI Listing
June 2017