Publications by authors named "Shalini R Unnikandam Veettil"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Cancer cell migration in collagen-hyaluronan composite extracellular matrices.

Acta Biomater 2021 Aug 8;130:183-198. Epub 2021 Jun 8.

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Iowa State University, United States; Department of Genetics, Development and Cell Biology, Iowa State University, United States. Electronic address:

Hyaluronan (HA) is a key component in the tumor microenvironment (TME) that participates in cancer growth and invasiveness. While the molecular weight (MW) dependent properties of HA can cause tumor-promoting and -repressing effects, the elevated levels of HA in the TME impedes drug delivery. The degradation of HA using hyaluronidases (HYALs), resulting in fragments of HA, is a way to overcome this, but the consequences of changes in HA molecular weight and concentration is currently unknown. Therefore, it is critical to understand the MW-dependent biological effects of HA. Here we examine the influence of HA molecular weight on biophysical properties that regulate cell migration and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. In our study, we used vLMW, LMW and HMW HA at different physiologically relevant concentrations, with a particular interest in correlating the mechanical and structural properties to different cell functions. The elastic modulus, collagen network pore size and collagen fiber diameter increased with increasing HA concentration. Although the collagen network pore size increased, these pores were filled with the bulky HA molecules. Consequently, cell migration decreased with increase in HA concentration due to multiple, long-lived and unproductive protrusions, suggesting the influence of steric factors. Surprisingly, even though elastic modulus increased with HA molecular weight and concentration, gel compaction assays showed an increased degree of ECM compaction among HMW HA gels at high concentrations (2 and 4 mg mL [0.2 and 0.4%]). These results were not seen in collagen gels that lacked HA, but had similar stiffness. HA appears to have the effect of decreasing migration and increasing collagen network contraction, but only at high HA molecular weight. Consequently, changes in HA molecular weight can have relatively large effects on cancer cell behavior. STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE: Hyaluronan (HA) is a critical component of the tumor microenvironment (TME). Overproduction of HA in the TME results in poor prognosis and collapse of blood vessels, inhibiting drug delivery. Hyaluronidases have been used to enhance drug delivery. However, they lead to low molecular weight (MW) HA, altering the mechanical and structural properties of the TME and cancer cell behavior. Understanding how HA degradation affects cancer cell behavior is critical for uncovering detrimental effects of this therapy. Very little is known about how HA MW affects cancer cell behavior in tumor-mimicking collagen-HA composite networks. Here we examine how MW and HA content in collagen-HA networks alter structural and mechanical properties to regulate cell migration and matrix remodeling in 3D TME-mimicking environments.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2021.06.009DOI Listing
August 2021

Tuning surface functionalization and collagen gel thickness to regulate cancer cell migration.

Colloids Surf B Biointerfaces 2019 Jul 16;179:37-47. Epub 2019 Mar 16.

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Iowa State University, United States; Department of Genetics, Development and Cell Biology, Iowa State University, United States. Electronic address:

Cancer cells have a tremendous ability to sense and respond to extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness, modulating invasion. The magnitude of the sensed stiffness can either promote or inhibit the migration of cancer cells out of the primary tumor into surrounding tissue. Work has been done on examining the role of stiffness in tuning cancer cell migration by controlling elastic modulus in the bulk. However, a powerful and complementary approach for controlling stiffness is to leverage interactions between stiff-soft (e.g. glass-hydrogel) interfaces. Unfortunately, most work in this area probes cells in 2D environments. Of the reports that probe 3D environments, none have assessed the role of mechanical linkage to the interface as a potential handle in controlling local stiffness and cell behavior. In this paper, we examine the migration of cancer cells embedded in a collagen fiber network between two flat plates. We examine the role of both surface attachment of the collagen network to the stiff interface as well as thickness (50-540 μm) of the collagen gel in driving collagen organization, cell morphology and cell migration. We find that surface attachment and thickness do not operate overlapping mechanisms, because they elicit different cell responses. While thickness and surface chemistry appear to control morphology, only thickness regulates collagen organization and cell migration speed. This suggests that surface attachment and thickness of the collagen gel control cell behavior through both collagen structure and local stiffness in confined fiber-forming networks.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.colsurfb.2019.03.031DOI Listing
July 2019