Publications by authors named "Shaimaa R Ahmed"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Antiulcer Potential of L. cv. Arbequina Leaf Extract Supported by Metabolic Profiling and Molecular Docking.

Antioxidants (Basel) 2021 Apr 22;10(5). Epub 2021 Apr 22.

Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Deraya University, New Minia City, Minia 61111, Egypt.

Gastric ulceration is among the most serious humanpublic health problems. L. cv. Arbequina is one of the numerous olive varieties which have scarcely been studied. The reported antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of the olive plant make it a potential prophylactic natural product against gastric ulcers. Consequently, the main goal of this study is to investigate the gastroprotective effect of L. cv. Arbequina leaf extract. LC-HRMS-based metabolic profiling of the alcoholic extract of L. cv. Arbequina led to the dereplication of 18 putative compounds (-). In vivo indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer in a rat model was established and the extract was tested at a dose of 300 mg kg compared to cimetidine (100 mg kg). The assessment of gastric mucosal lesions and histopathology of gastric tissue was done. It has been proved that significantly decreased the ulcer index and protected the mucosa from lesions. The antioxidant potential of the extract was evaluated using three in vitro assays, HO scavenging, xanthine oxidase inhibitory, and superoxide radical scavenging activities and showed promising activities. Moreover, an in silico based study was performed on the putatively dereplicated compounds, which highlighted that 3-hydroxy tyrosol () and oleacein () can target the 5-lipoxygenase enzyme (5-LOX) as a protective mechanism against the pathogenesis of ulceration. Upon experimental validation, both compounds 3-hydroxy tyrosol (HT) and oleacein (OC) ( and , respectively) exhibited a significant in vitro 5-LOX inhibitory activity with IC values of 8.6 and 5.8 µg/mL, respectively. The present study suggested a possible implication of leaves as a potential candidate having gastroprotective, antioxidant, and 5-LOX inhibitory activity for the management of gastric ulcers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/antiox10050644DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8146603PMC
April 2021

Oil as A Potential Treatment for Wound Infection: In Vitro and In Vivo Bioassays in Relation to Its Chemical Composition.

Antibiotics (Basel) 2020 Oct 7;9(10). Epub 2020 Oct 7.

Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University, Kasr el-Aini street, Cairo 11562, Egypt.

Bacterial biofilm contributes to antibiotic resistance. Developing antibiofilm agents, more favored from natural origin, is a potential method for treatment of highly virulent multidrug resistant (MDR) bacterial strains; The potential of and essential oils (E.Os) antibacterial and antibiofilm activities in relation to their chemical composition, in addition to their ability to treat wound infection in mice model were investigated; leaf E.O at 0.05 µg·mL efficiently inhibited and eradicated biofilm formed by by 85% and 34%, respectively. Both and leaf E.Os showed a bactericidal action against within 6h at 2.08 µg·mL. In addition, a significant reduction of microbial load in mice wound infection model was found. Furthermore, gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis revealed qualitative and quantitative differences among and leaf and berry E.Os. Monoterpene hydrocarbons, oxygenated monoterpenes, and phenolics were the major detected classes. β-Myrcene, limonene, 1,8-cineole, and eugenol were the most abundant volatiles. While, sesquiterpenes were found as minor components in berries E.O; Our finding suggests the potential antimicrobial activity of leaf E.O against MDR wound infections and their underlying mechanism and to be further tested clinically as treatment for MDR infections.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9100679DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7600634PMC
October 2020

In vitro cytotoxic activity of six Syzygium leaf extracts as related to their phenolic profiles: An untargeted UHPLC-QTOF-MS approach.

Food Res Int 2019 12 9;126:108715. Epub 2019 Oct 9.

Pharmacognosy Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University, 11562, Kasr El-Ainy, Cairo, Egypt.

Untargeted metabolomics was used in this study to discriminate the phenolic fingerprints of six Syzygium species. This approach resulted in the annotation of 441 compounds that belong to different phenolic classes, such as flavonoids, lignans, stilbenes, tyrosols, alkylphenols, and phenolic acids. Multivariate data analysis unraveled the main differences between the studied species. S. paniculatum and S. aqueum were the richest sources in terms of phenolic compounds, cumulatively amounting to 355.3 and 266.4 mg/g dry matter, respectively. Nevertheless, S. jambos showed reduced amounts of phenolics, when compared with other species. The biological activity of Syzygium leaf extracts was assessed on MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Potent estrogenic activity was detected using the SRB assay on MCF-7. This activity may be ascribable to the presence of phenolic compounds miming phytoestrogens such as lignans, stilbenes, and isoflavonoids in the investigated Syzygium extracts. By examining the biological effect of Syzygium extracts against MDA-MB-231 cell lines, the Syzygium gratum leaf extract exhibited the strongest inhibition, with IC = 19.4 µg/mL, followed by S. paniculatum (IC = 50.9 µg/mL). However, the Syzygium gratum leaf extract showed a potent cytotoxic effect on normal human skin fibroblasts, HSF (IC = 1.24 µg/mL), assuming a nonselective cytotoxic effect. On the other hand, other studied Syzygium leaves proved as safe nutraceuticals (IC ≥ 100 µg/mL) on HSF cell lines. Our study suggested a possible implication of Syzygium malaccense and Syzygium aqueum leaves as potential estrogenic candidates in relation to their health-promoting phenolic constituents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodres.2019.108715DOI Listing
December 2019
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