Publications by authors named "Shahnaz Sultana"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Bioactive Natural Antivirals: An Updated Review of the Available Plants and Isolated Molecules.

Molecules 2020 Oct 22;25(21). Epub 2020 Oct 22.

Substance Abuse and Toxicology Research Centre, Jazan University, Jazan 45142, Saudi Arabia.

Viral infections and associated diseases are responsible for a substantial number of mortality and public health problems around the world. Each year, infectious diseases kill 3.5 million people worldwide. The current pandemic caused by COVID-19 has become the greatest health hazard to people in their lifetime. There are many antiviral drugs and vaccines available against viruses, but they have many disadvantages, too. There are numerous side effects for conventional drugs, and active mutation also creates drug resistance against various viruses. This has led scientists to search herbs as a source for the discovery of more efficient new antivirals. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 65% of the world population is in the practice of using plants and herbs as part of treatment modality. Additionally, plants have an advantage in drug discovery based on their long-term use by humans, and a reduced toxicity and abundance of bioactive compounds can be expected as a result. In this review, we have highlighted the important viruses, their drug targets, and their replication cycle. We provide in-depth and insightful information about the most favorable plant extracts and their derived phytochemicals against viral targets. Our major conclusion is that plant extracts and their isolated pure compounds are essential sources for the current viral infections and useful for future challenges.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules25214878DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7659943PMC
October 2020

Recent Advancements in the Diagnosis, Prevention, and Prospective Drug Therapy of COVID-19.

Front Public Health 2020 10;8:384. Epub 2020 Jul 10.

Department of Pharmacognosy, College of Pharmacy, Jazan University, Jazan, Saudi Arabia.

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (CoV)-2 (SARS-CoV-2), previously called 2019 novel CoV, emerged from China in late December 2019. This virus causes CoV disease-19 (COVID-19), which has been proven a global pandemic leading to a major outbreak. As of June 19, 2020, the data from the World Health Organization (WHO) showed more than 8.7 million confirmed cases in over 200 countries/regions. The WHO has declared COVID-19 as the sixth public health emergency of international concern on January 30, 2020. CoVs cause illnesses that range in severity from the common cold to severe respiratory illnesses and death. Nevertheless, with technological advances and imperative lessons gained from prior outbreaks, humankind is better outfitted to deal with the latest emerging group of CoVs. Studies on the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and drug re-purposing are being carried out in this field. Currently, no approved treatment is available for SARS-CoV-2 given the lack of evidence. The results from preliminary clinical trials have been mixed as far as improvement in the clinical condition and reduction in the duration of treatment are concerned. A number of new clinical trials are currently in progress to test the efficacy and safety of various approved drugs. This review focuses on recent advancements in the field of development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and treatment approaches for COVID-19.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2020.00384DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7381292PMC
July 2020

Isolation and identification of salt-tolerant plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria and their application for rice cultivation under salt stress.

Can J Microbiol 2020 Feb 12;66(2):144-160. Epub 2019 Nov 12.

Department of Microbiology, University of Dhaka, Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh.

Growth and productivity of rice are negatively affected by soil salinity. However, some salt-tolerant rhizosphere-inhabiting bacteria can improve salt resistance of plants, thereby augmenting plant growth and production. Here, we isolated a total of 53 plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) from saline and non-saline areas in Bangladesh where electrical conductivity was measured as >7.45 and <1.80 dS/m, respectively. Bacteria isolated from saline areas were able to grow in a salt concentration of up to 2.60 mol/L, contrary to the isolates collected from non-saline areas that did not survive beyond 854 mmol/L. Among the salt-tolerant isolates, , , and , identified by comparing respective sequences of 16S rRNA using the NCBI GenBank, exhibited a higher amount of atmospheric nitrogen fixation, phosphate solubilization, and indoleacetic acid production at 200 mmol/L salt stress. Salt-tolerant isolates exhibited greater resistance to heavy metals and antibiotics, which could be due to the production of an exopolysaccharide layer outside the cell surface. L. fertilized with MS3 and grown under 200 mmol/L salt stress was found to be favoured by enhanced expression of a set of at least four salt-responsive plant genes: , , , and . Fertilization of rice with osmoprotectant-producing PGPR, therefore, could be a climate-change-preparedness strategy for coastal agriculture.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/cjm-2019-0323DOI Listing
February 2020

A new flavonoid glycoside from the seeds of Cicer arietinum Linn.

Acta Pol Pharm 2011 Jul-Aug;68(4):605-8

Phytochemistry Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jamia Hamdard (Hamdard University), New Delhi-110062, India.

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August 2011

New sterol esters from the flowers of Punica granatum Linn.

J Asian Nat Prod Res 2009 Aug;11(8):710-5

Phytochemistry Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jamia Hamdard (Hamdard University), New Delhi, India.

Two new beta-sitosterol esters have been isolated from the flowers of Punica granatum Linn. (Punicaceae) along with the known compounds n-tricosane (3), n-heptacosanyl n-hexanoate (4), olean-5,12-dien-3beta-ol-28-oic acid (5), and olean-12-en-3beta-ol-28-oic acid (6). The structures of the new phytosterols have been elucidated as stigmast-5-en-3beta-ol-3beta-dodecanoate (beta-sitosterol laurate, 1) and stigmast-5-en-3beta-ol-3beta-tetradecanoate (beta-sitosterol myristate, 2) on the basis of spectral data and chemical analyses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10286020903004291DOI Listing
August 2009

New 4'-substituted flavones from the fruit peels of Citrus limon (L.) Burm.f.

J Asian Nat Prod Res 2008 Nov-Dec;10(11-12):1123-7

Department of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jamia Hamdard (Hamdard University), New Delhi, India.

Two new 4'-substituted flavones isolated from the fruit peels of Citrus limon (L.) Burm.f. (Rutaceae) have been characterized as 4'-(9'-ethylene-16'-methylnon-9',15'-dien-7',11'-oate)-5,7-dimethoxyflavone (limonflavonyl lactone A, 1) and 4'-(9'-ethylene-16'-methylnon-9',15'-dien-7',11'-oate)-5,7,3'-trimethoxyflavone (limonflavonyl lactone B, 2) on the basis of spectral data and chemical analyses. Both the flavones are reported for the first time from a plant source.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10286020802434953DOI Listing
March 2009

Antidiabetic effect of Punica granatum flowers: effect on hyperlipidemia, pancreatic cells lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes in experimental diabetes.

Food Chem Toxicol 2009 Jan 4;47(1):50-4. Epub 2008 Oct 4.

Department of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry, Pharmacognosy and Pharmaceutical Research Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jamia Hamdard (Hamdard University), New Delhi-110062, India.

The present study investigated the effects of Punica granatum aqueous extract (PgAq) on streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats by measuring fasting blood glucose, lipid profiles (atherogenic index), lipid peroxidation (LPO) and activities of both non-enzymatic and enzymatic antioxidants. Diabetes was induced by single intraperitoneal injection of STZ (60 mg/kg) to albino Wistar rats. The increase in blood glucose level, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), LPO level with decrease in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), reduced glutathione (GSH) content and antioxidant enzymes namely, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were the salient features observed in diabetic rats. On the other hand, oral administration of PgAq at doses of 250 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg for 21 days resulted in a significant reduction in fasting blood glucose, TC, TG, LDL-C, VLDL-C and tissue LPO levels coupled with elevation of HDL-C, GSH content and antioxidant enzymes in comparison with diabetic control group. The results suggest that PG could be used, as a dietary supplement, in the treatment of chronic diseases characterized by atherogenous lipoprotein profile, aggravated antioxidant status and impaired glucose metabolism and also in their prevention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2008.09.058DOI Listing
January 2009

Steroidal constituents of rice (Rryza sativa) hulls with algicidal and herbicidal activity against blue-green algae and duckweed.

Phytochem Anal 2007 Mar-Apr;18(2):133-45

Department of Applied Life Science, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701, South Korea.

Two new compounds, 14-methyl stigmast-9(11)-en-3alpha-ol-3beta-D-glucopyranoside (1) and cholest-11-en-3beta, 6beta, 7alpha, 22beta-tetraol-24-one-3beta-palmitoleate (2), along with the known compound beta-sitosteryl-3beta-D-glucopyranosyl-6'-linoleiate (3), were isolated from the methanolic extract of rice (Oryza sativa) hulls. The structures of the two new compounds were elucidated using one- and two-dimensional NMR in combination with IR, EI/MS, FAB/MS, HR-EI/MS and HR-FAB/MS. In bioassays with blue-green algae, Microcystis aeruginosa UTEX 2388 and duckweed, Lemna paucicostata Hegelm 381, the efficacy of bioactivity of the two new compounds linearly increased as the concentration increased from 0.3 to 300 IgM. Compared with momilactone A, compounds 1 and 2 showed similar and higher inhibitory activities against the growth of M. aeruginosa at a concentration of 300 microM. However, compound 2 was similar to momilactone A in inhibiting L. paucicostata growth at a concentration of 300 microM. As a result, compound 2 appears to have a strong potential for the environmentally friendly control of weed and algae that are harmful to water-logged rice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pca.961DOI Listing
May 2007