Dr Seyedpouzhia Shojaei, MD - Assistant Professor, Fellowship of Critical Care Medicine, Anesthesiology Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences,Tehran, Iran - Icu intensivist

Dr Seyedpouzhia Shojaei

MD

Assistant Professor, Fellowship of Critical Care Medicine, Anesthesiology Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences,Tehran, Iran

Icu intensivist

Tehran | Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Main Specialties: Anesthesiology

Additional Specialties: Anesthesiology , critical care

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-8708-0119

Dr Seyedpouzhia Shojaei, MD - Assistant Professor, Fellowship of Critical Care Medicine, Anesthesiology Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences,Tehran, Iran - Icu intensivist

Dr Seyedpouzhia Shojaei

MD

Introduction

Assistant professor and Icu intensivist in sbmu...

Primary Affiliation: Assistant Professor, Fellowship of Critical Care Medicine, Anesthesiology Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences,Tehran, Iran - Tehran , Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:

Education

Sep 2007 - Sep 2011
Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences School of Medicine
Anesthesiology Residency
Sep 2007 - Sep 2011
Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences School of Medicine
Anesthesiology Residency
Sep 1996 - Sep 2003
Tabriz University of Medical Sciences
M.D

Experience

Oct 2016 - Jul 2017
Loghman Hospital
ICU Man
Jan 2016 - Jan 2017
Loghman Hakim hospital
Running the ICU
Jan 2015 - Jan 2016
Payambaran Hospital
Director of ICU
Jan 2012 - Jan 2013
Rasool Akram Hospital
Anesthesiologis
Jan 2012 - Jan 2013
Shahid Sayyad Shirazi Hospital
ICU
Jan 2011 - Jan 2013
Imam Khomeini Hospital
Anesthesiologist
Jan 2012 - Jan 2012
Golestan University of Medical Sciences and Health Services Medical School
Faculty Member of Golestan University of Medical Sciences
Jan 2010 - Jan 2011
Taleghani General Hospital
ICU
Jan 2007 - Jan 2009
Masih Daneshvari Hospital
ICU and Transplant Unit
Jan 2018
Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences
Assistant Professor, Fellowship of critical care medicine
Anesthesiology research Center - Imam Hossein Hospital
Jan 2017
Imam Hossein Hospital
ICU Man
May 2016
Sasan Hospital
ICU Man

Publications

13Publications

1504Reads

4805Profile Views

Spiritual Health and Outcomes in Muslim ICU Patients: A Nationwide Cross-Sectional Study.

J Relig Health 2018 Dec;57(6):2241-2257

Department of Emergency Medicine, Vidant Medical Center, East Carolina University Brody School of Medicine, 600 Moye Blvd, Greenville, NC, 27834, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10943-017-0543-5
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10943-017-0543-5DOI Listing
December 2018
573 Reads

Interim study: Comparison of safety and efficacy of Levofloxacin plus Colistin regimen with Levofloxacin plus high dose Ampicillin/Sulbactam infusion in treatment of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia due to multi drug resistant Acinetobacter (special 2018)

Iranian journal of pharmaceutical research

Abstract
Due to the emerging antibiotic resistance of Acinetobacter, which is the leading cause of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in critically ill patients, there is an urgent need for studies comparing various antibiotic regimens for its treatment. 
In this single blinded randomized clinical trial, adult patients with VAP due to multi drug resistant Acinetobacter (MDRA), were randomly assigned to receive 9×109 unit loading dose of Colistin followed by 4.5×109 unit intravenously twice daily plus 750mg intravenous Levofloxacin daily or continuous infusion of Ampicillin/Sulbactam, 24g daily plus 750mg IV Levofloxacin daily. Dose and dosing interval were adjusted according to serum creatinine levels during the study. Clinical and microbiological cure, inflammatory biomarkers and possible adverse effects were recorded in participants. 
Twenty-nine patients were recruited (14 in Colistin and 15 in Ampicillin/Sulbactam groups). Three patient excluded in each group. Clinical response occurred in 3 (27%) and 10 (83%) in Colistin and Ampicillin-Sulbactam arms, respectively (P=0.007). Nephrotoxicity happened in 6 (54%) and 1 (8%) of cases in Colistin and Ampicillin-Sulbactam groups, (P=0.016). 14-day and 28-day survival rate were significantly higher in Ampicillin-Sulbactam group compared to Colistin arm with P values of 0.002 and 0.049, respectively. 
This study revealed that Levofloxacin plus high dose Ampicillin/Sulbactam as continuous infusion is more effective than Levofloxacin plus Colistin in patients with MDR Acinetobacter VAP with significantly lower risk of nephrotoxicity.
Keywords
PneumoniaVentilator-AssociatedAcinetobacterAmpicillin-SulbactamColistinLevofloxacin

View Article
December 2018
11 Reads

Bacteriologic Evaluation of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia According to Stress Related Mucosal Disease Prophylaxis in the Intensive Care Unit

10.5812/archcid.82521

Clinical infectious disiease

Abstract Background: Ventilator associated pneumonia is one of the most important nosocomial infections with often poor outcomes and heavy economic burdens on health care systems. Objectives: Several studies have been done for evaluating the effect of different types of stress related mucosal disease (SRMD) prophylaxis on nosocomial pneumonia, as among factors participating in its establishment, gastrointestinal tract is believed to play an important role especially in ventilator-associated pneumonia. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 150 patients who were admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) and developed documented culture positive VAP, were evaluated for the study inclusion criteria. The patients with clinical pulmonary infection score (CPIS) ≥ 6 were included and some others with conditions affecting comparability excluded. The patients with Acute Physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHEII) scores between 10 and 24, within the first 24 hours of ICU stay, were included. Finally, 100 patients who fulfilled all criteria were evaluated for the responsible organisms and type of SRMD prophylaxis they had received. The patients included were either on intravenous pantoprazole (49 patients) or intravenous ranitidine (51 patients). The goal of this study was to evaluate the organisms, which have been isolated from the sputum of ICU patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia, according to their SRMD prophylaxis regimen. Results: There were 59 men (59%) and 41 women (41%) ranging from 19 to 82 years old. The mean ages were not significantly different between the two groups (P = 0.586). APACHEII score was ranging between 15 and 21 with the mean of 17.57 in pantoprazole and 16.80 in ranitidine group (P = 0.006), there was a statistical but not clinical difference. With P-value of 0.001, there was significant difference in ICU stay days. The mean mortality rates were 18.4% and 1.8% for pantoprazole and ranitidine group, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Multi-drug resistant pathogens were significantly higher in the pantoprazole group (0.001). The organisms, which have been obtained from each group were different. Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were highly cultivated in the pantoprazole group, while Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus were more in patients who had received ranitidine. Conclusions: It can be suggested that each bacterium has a unique propensity to grow in specific gastric pH and other systemic changes made by various agents used for SRMD prophylaxis. More studies are needed to evaluate large number of patients receiving SRMD prophylaxis, with perspective of VAP incidence, the responsible organisms, hospital and ICU stay days, and mortality rate in order to prevent poor outcomes caused by specific organisms. Keywords: Ventilator Associated Pneumonia; Microbiology; Anti-Ulcer Agents; Intensive Care Unit

View Article
November 2018
15 Reads

Post-ICU psychological morbidity in very long ICU stay patients with ARDS and delirium.

J Crit Care 2018 Feb 24;43:88-94. Epub 2017 Aug 24.

Department of Emergency Medicine, J.W. Ruby Memorial Hospital, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA; Department of Emergency Medicine, Vident Medical Center, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA. Electronic address:

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08839441173086
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcrc.2017.08.034DOI Listing
February 2018
741 Reads
2.191 Impact Factor

MINI SURGICAL VERSUS STANDARD METHOD IN PERCUTANEOUS DILATION TRACHEOSTOMY

critical care medicine congress abstracts

View Article
2014
35 Reads

Top co-authors

Reza Goharani
Reza Goharani

Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences

4
Sevak Hatamian
Sevak Hatamian

Qazvin University of Medical Sciences

4
Andrew C Miller
Andrew C Miller

State University of New York Downstate Medical Center and Kings County Hospital Center

4
Farshid R Bashar
Farshid R Bashar

Hamadan University of Medical Sciences

4
Amir Vahedian-Azimi
Amir Vahedian-Azimi

Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences

4
Behrooz Farzanegan
Behrooz Farzanegan

Shahid Beheshti University

4
Seyed J Madani
Seyed J Madani

Trauma Research Center

3
Hosseinali J Moghaddam
Hosseinali J Moghaddam

Anesthesiology Research Center

2