Dr Seyedpouzhia Shojaei, MD - Assistant Professor, Fellowship of Critical Care Medicine, Anesthesiology Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences,Tehran, Iran - Icu intensivist

Dr Seyedpouzhia Shojaei

MD

Assistant Professor, Fellowship of Critical Care Medicine, Anesthesiology Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences,Tehran, Iran

Icu intensivist

Tehran | Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Main Specialties: Anesthesiology

Additional Specialties: Anesthesiology , critical care

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-8708-0119

Dr Seyedpouzhia Shojaei, MD - Assistant Professor, Fellowship of Critical Care Medicine, Anesthesiology Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences,Tehran, Iran - Icu intensivist

Dr Seyedpouzhia Shojaei

MD

Introduction

Assistant professor and Icu intensivist in sbmu...

Primary Affiliation: Assistant Professor, Fellowship of Critical Care Medicine, Anesthesiology Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences,Tehran, Iran - Tehran , Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:

Metrics

Number of Publications

13

Publications

Number of Profile Views

4342

Profile Views

Number of Article Reads

1241

Reads

Education

Sep 2007 - Sep 2011
Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences School of Medicine
Anesthesiology Residency
Sep 2007 - Sep 2011
Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences School of Medicine
Anesthesiology Residency
Sep 1996 - Sep 2003
Tabriz University of Medical Sciences
M.D

Experience

Oct 2016 - Jul 2017
Loghman Hospital
ICU Man
Jan 2016 - Jan 2017
Loghman Hakim hospital
Running the ICU
Jan 2015 - Jan 2016
Payambaran Hospital
Director of ICU
Jan 2012 - Jan 2013
Rasool Akram Hospital
Anesthesiologis
Jan 2012 - Jan 2013
Shahid Sayyad Shirazi Hospital
ICU
Jan 2011 - Jan 2013
Imam Khomeini Hospital
Anesthesiologist
Jan 2012 - Jan 2012
Golestan University of Medical Sciences and Health Services Medical School
Faculty Member of Golestan University of Medical Sciences
Jan 2010 - Jan 2011
Taleghani General Hospital
ICU
Jan 2007 - Jan 2009
Masih Daneshvari Hospital
ICU and Transplant Unit
Jan 2018
Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences
Assistant Professor, Fellowship of critical care medicine
Jan 2017
Imam Hossein Hospital
ICU Man
May 2016
Sasan Hospital
ICU Man

Top co-authors

Sevak Hatamian
Sevak Hatamian

Qazvin University of Medical Sciences

2
Farshid R Bashar
Farshid R Bashar

Hamadan University of Medical Sciences

2
Hosseinali J Moghaddam
Hosseinali J Moghaddam

Anesthesiology Research Center

2
Andrew C Miller
Andrew C Miller

State University of New York Downstate Medical Center and Kings County Hospital Center

2
Seyed J Madani
Seyed J Madani

Trauma Research Center

2
Kivan G Moghaddam
Kivan G Moghaddam

Shariati Hospital

2
Mahmood Salesi
Mahmood Salesi

Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences

2
Amir Vahedian-Azimi
Amir Vahedian-Azimi

Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences

2
Reza Goharani
Reza Goharani

Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences

2

Publications

13Publications

1241Reads

Spiritual Health and Outcomes in Muslim ICU Patients: A Nationwide Cross-Sectional Study.

J Relig Health 2018 Dec;57(6):2241-2257

Department of Emergency Medicine, Vidant Medical Center, East Carolina University Brody School of Medicine, 600 Moye Blvd, Greenville, NC, 27834, USA.

View Article
December 2018
545 Reads

Comparison of non-invasive to invasive oxygenation ratios for diagnosing acute respiratory distress syndrome following coronary artery bypass graft surgery: a prospective derivation-validation cohort study

https://doi.org/10.1186/s13019-018-0804-8

Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery

Abstract Objective To determine if non-invasive oxygenation indices, namely peripheral capillary oxygen saturation (SpO2)/fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) and partial pressure of alveolar oxygen (PAO2)/FiO2 may be used as effective surrogates for the partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2)/FiO2. Also, to determine the SpO2/FiO2 and PAO2/FiO2 values that correspond to PaO2/FiO2 thresholds for identifying acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in patients following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Methods A prospective derivation-validation cohort study in the Open-Heart ICU of an academic teaching hospital. Recorded variables included patient demographics, ventilator settings, chest radiograph results, and SPO2, PaO2, PAO2, SaO2, and FiO2. Linear regression modeling was used to quantify the relationship between indices. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the threshold values. Results One-hundred seventy-five patients were enrolled in the derivation cohort, and 358 in the validation cohort. The SPO2/FiO2 and PAO2/FiO2 ratios could be predicted well from PaO2/FiO2, described by the linear regression models SPO2/FiO2 = 71.149 + 0.8PF and PAO2/FiO2 = 38.098 + 2.312PF, respectively. According to the linear regression equation, a PaO2/FiO2 ratio of 300 equaled an SPO2/FiO2 ratio of 311 (R2 0.857, F 1035.742, < 0.0001) and a PAO2/FiO2 ratio of 732 (R2 0.576, F 234.887, < 0.0001). The SPO2/FiO2 threshold of 311 had 90% sensitivity, 80% specificity, LR+ 4.50, LR- 0.13, PPV 98, and NPV 42.1 for the diagnosis of mild ARDS. The PAO2/FiO2 threshold of 732 had 86% sensitivity, 90% specificity, LR+ 8.45, LR- 0.16, PPV 98.9, and NPV 36 for the diagnosis of mild ARDS. SPO2/FiO2 had excellent discrimination ability for mild ARDS (AUC ± SE = 0.92 ± 0.017; 95% CI 0.889 to 0.947) as did PAO2/FiO2 (AUC ± SE = 0.915 ± 0.018; 95% CI 0.881 to0.942). Conclusions PaO2 and SaO2 correlated in the diagnosis of ARDS, with a PaO2/FiO2 of 300 correlating to an SPO2/ FiO2 of 311 (Sensitivity 90%, Specificity 80%). The SPO2/ FiO2 ratio may allow for early real-time rapid identification of ARDS, while decreasing the cost, phlebotomy, blood loss, pain, skin breaks, and vascular punctures associated with serial arterial blood gas measurements.

View Article
November 2018
6 Reads

Bacteriologic Evaluation of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia According to Stress Related Mucosal Disease Prophylaxis in the Intensive Care Unit

10.5812/archcid.82521

Clinical infectious disiease

Abstract Background: Ventilator associated pneumonia is one of the most important nosocomial infections with often poor outcomes and heavy economic burdens on health care systems. Objectives: Several studies have been done for evaluating the effect of different types of stress related mucosal disease (SRMD) prophylaxis on nosocomial pneumonia, as among factors participating in its establishment, gastrointestinal tract is believed to play an important role especially in ventilator-associated pneumonia. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 150 patients who were admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) and developed documented culture positive VAP, were evaluated for the study inclusion criteria. The patients with clinical pulmonary infection score (CPIS) ≥ 6 were included and some others with conditions affecting comparability excluded. The patients with Acute Physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHEII) scores between 10 and 24, within the first 24 hours of ICU stay, were included. Finally, 100 patients who fulfilled all criteria were evaluated for the responsible organisms and type of SRMD prophylaxis they had received. The patients included were either on intravenous pantoprazole (49 patients) or intravenous ranitidine (51 patients). The goal of this study was to evaluate the organisms, which have been isolated from the sputum of ICU patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia, according to their SRMD prophylaxis regimen. Results: There were 59 men (59%) and 41 women (41%) ranging from 19 to 82 years old. The mean ages were not significantly different between the two groups (P = 0.586). APACHEII score was ranging between 15 and 21 with the mean of 17.57 in pantoprazole and 16.80 in ranitidine group (P = 0.006), there was a statistical but not clinical difference. With P-value of 0.001, there was significant difference in ICU stay days. The mean mortality rates were 18.4% and 1.8% for pantoprazole and ranitidine group, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Multi-drug resistant pathogens were significantly higher in the pantoprazole group (0.001). The organisms, which have been obtained from each group were different. Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were highly cultivated in the pantoprazole group, while Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus were more in patients who had received ranitidine. Conclusions: It can be suggested that each bacterium has a unique propensity to grow in specific gastric pH and other systemic changes made by various agents used for SRMD prophylaxis. More studies are needed to evaluate large number of patients receiving SRMD prophylaxis, with perspective of VAP incidence, the responsible organisms, hospital and ICU stay days, and mortality rate in order to prevent poor outcomes caused by specific organisms. Keywords: Ventilator Associated Pneumonia; Microbiology; Anti-Ulcer Agents; Intensive Care Unit

View Article
November 2018
10 Reads

Post-ICU psychological morbidity in very long ICU stay patients with ARDS and delirium.

J Crit Care 2018 Feb 24;43:88-94. Epub 2017 Aug 24.

Department of Emergency Medicine, J.W. Ruby Memorial Hospital, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA; Department of Emergency Medicine, Vident Medical Center, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA. Electronic address:

View Article
February 2018
696 Reads
2.190 Impact Factor

MINI SURGICAL VERSUS STANDARD METHOD IN PERCUTANEOUS DILATION TRACHEOSTOMY

critical care medicine congress abstracts

View Article
2014
32 Reads

Top co-authors

Sevak Hatamian
Sevak Hatamian

Qazvin University of Medical Sciences

2
Farshid R Bashar
Farshid R Bashar

Hamadan University of Medical Sciences

2
Hosseinali J Moghaddam
Hosseinali J Moghaddam

Anesthesiology Research Center

2
Andrew C Miller
Andrew C Miller

State University of New York Downstate Medical Center and Kings County Hospital Center

2
Seyed J Madani
Seyed J Madani

Trauma Research Center

2
Kivan G Moghaddam
Kivan G Moghaddam

Shariati Hospital

2
Mahmood Salesi
Mahmood Salesi

Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences

2
Amir Vahedian-Azimi
Amir Vahedian-Azimi

Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences

2
Reza Goharani
Reza Goharani

Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences

2