Publications by authors named "Seyedeh Sedigheh Hamzavi"

6 Publications

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Orbital mucormycosis in immunocompetent children; review of risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment approach.

BMC Infect Dis 2020 Oct 19;20(1):770. Epub 2020 Oct 19.

Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Namazi Hospital, 7193711351, Zand Ave, Shiraz, Iran.

Background: Orbital mucormycosis is a rare but potentially severe and troublesome invasive fungal infection that could be occurred even in healthy individuals. The initial clinical presentation is similar to bacterial pre-septal or septal cellulitis, especially in early stages.

Case Presentation: Herein, we describe the successful management of a series of five cases presenting with orbital mucormycosis in previously healthy children.

Conclusions: Orbital mucormycosis is extremely rare in healthy children and maybe life-threatening when diagnosis delayed given a similar clinical presentation with bacterial septal cellulitis. Intravenous antifungal therapy with amphotericin B and timely surgical drainage is live-saving.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12879-020-05460-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7574198PMC
October 2020

A Case of COVID 19 and Coinfection.

Arch Iran Med 2020 08 1;23(8):568-569. Epub 2020 Aug 1.

Professor Alborzi Clinical Microbiology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Since December 2019, we have seen a significant number of cases of a novel coronavirus (2019-nCov), first identified in Wuhan China. Coronavirus might coexist with other infections such as .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.34172/aim.2020.62DOI Listing
August 2020

Changing face of Candida colonization pattern in pediatric patients with hematological malignancy during repeated hospitalizations, results of a prospective observational study (2016-2017) in shiraz, Iran.

BMC Infect Dis 2019 Aug 30;19(1):759. Epub 2019 Aug 30.

Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: Surveillance of current changes in the epidemiology of Invasive Fungal Diseases (IFDs) as an important component of the antifungal stewardship programs (ASP), requires careful regular monitoring, especially in high-risk settings such as oncology centers. This study aimed to examine Candida colonization status and corresponding current changes in children with malignancy during repeated admissions and also investigate the possible epidemiological shifts after the implementation of ASP.

Methods: In this prospective observational study, all eligible patients younger than 18 years were recruited during 2016-2017 at Amir Medical Oncology Center (AMOC) in Shiraz, Iran. Totally, 136 patients were enrolled and 482 samples were collected from different sites (oral/nasal discharges, urine and stool). Weekly regular sampling was carried out during hospitalization. Candida colonization status and epidemiological changes were monitored during repeated admissions. Samples were cultivated on Sabouraud Dextrose agar medium and identified by Polymerase Chain Reaction -Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP).

Results: Estimated Candida colonization incidence was 59.9% (82/136) in our patients. Candida colonization was found to be higher in oral cavity and rectum than that in nasal cavity. Among those long-term follow ups and repetitive hospitalizations, a significant number of patients exhibited changes in their colonization patterns (37.7%). Candida colonization did not reveal any significant relationship with age, sex, oncologic diseases and degree of neutropenia. C. albicans (72.0%) was found as the most common Candida species in colonized patients, followed by C. krusei, C. kefyr, C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis.

Conclusion: Given the high incidence of Candida infections in children with cancers, close monitoring of epidemiologic changes is essential for judicious management, based on local surveillance data and improvement of overall quality of care in high risk patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12879-019-4372-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6717378PMC
August 2019

Successful Treatment of Disseminated Cutaneous Leishmaniasis With Liposomal Amphotericin B and Miltefosine in an Eight-year-old Girl.

Pediatr Infect Dis J 2018 03;37(3):275-277

This case report presents an 8-year-old girl, from Fars province in Iran, diagnosed with cutaneous leishmaniasis in the form of multiple nodular, ulcerative and crusted lesions disseminated on the face, trunk and extremities. The result of direct smear of ulcers was positive for Leishmania parasite. The patient had no immunodeficiency or relevant family history making her susceptible for disseminated cutaneous leishmaniasis. The skin lesions failed to respond to multiple treatment courses of meglumine antimoniate or amphotericin B but were successfully treated with simultaneous miltefosine and liposomal amphotericin B.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/INF.0000000000001741DOI Listing
March 2018

Tyrosinemia Presenting With Multiple Hepatic Lesions and Splenomegaly.

J Clin Gastroenterol 2019 01;53(1):76-77

Department of Pediatrics, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MCG.0000000000000744DOI Listing
January 2019

Serum insulinlike growth factor-1 and its binding protein-3 levels in children with cirrhosis waiting for a liver transplant.

Exp Clin Transplant 2012 Jun;10(3):252-7

Shiraz Transplant Research Center and the Gastroenterohepatology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Objectives: Investigate the prognostic value of serum insulinlike growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and its binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) in pediatric patients with liver cirrhosis, and investigate the correlation between these parameters and other available prognostic factors including Child-Pugh scoring, Pediatric End-Stage Liver Disease, and Mayo End-Stage Liver Disease scoring.

Materials And Methods: This prospective, case-controlled study was done at the Nemazee hospital for 12 months from August 2009 to August 2010. It included 45 pediatric patients (< 18 years) diagnosed with liver cirrhosis and 38 healthy age and sex-matched controls. The extent and severity of the liver disease was evaluated by the Child-Pugh classification and Pediatric End-Stage Liver Disease/Mayo End-Stage Liver Disease scores. Serum levels of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 were determined and were compared to controls and their correlation with Child-Pugh and Pediatric End-Stage Liver Disease/Mayo End-Stage Liver Disease scores were investigated.

Results: The most-common cause of liver cirrhosis was biliary atresia being found in 11 patients (24.4%) followed by tyrosinemia in 8 (17.8%). IGF-1 serum levels were significantly lower in cirrhotic patients compared with controls (3.85 ± 3.69 nmol/L vs 41.79 ± 16.03 nmol/L; P < .001). Serum levels of IGFBP-3 also were significantly lower in patients with liver cirrhosis compared with healthy controls (46.66 ± 30.57 nmol/L vs 205.63 ± 25.52 nmol/L; P < .001). Serum levels of IGF-1 were significantly lower in patients with stage B (P = .047) and C (P = .036) of Child-Pugh classification compared with stage A. Serum levels of IGF-1 (r ≈ 0.227; P = .034) and IGFBP-3 (r ≈ 0.389; P = .008) were negatively correlated with Pediatric End-stage Liver Disease / Mayo End-stage Liver Disease scores.

Conclusions: The serum levels of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 are decreased in children with liver cirrhosis. The stage of liver dysfunction is correlated to serum levels of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 in children. Thus, these 2 factors can be used for assessing the prognosis and outcome in those children with liver cirrhosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6002/ect.2011.0095DOI Listing
June 2012