Seyed Shahmy  - SACTRC

Seyed Shahmy

SACTRC

Peradeniya, Central | Sri Lanka

Main Specialties: Epidemiology, Medical Toxicology, Pharmacology

Additional Specialties: Pharmacokinetics, Data modeling, Clinical Trials

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-2339-1572

Seyed Shahmy  - SACTRC

Seyed Shahmy

Introduction

Seyed Shahmy, is the Research Operations Manager/Fellow of the University of Colombo,Sri Lanka. He holds a basic degree in Pharmacy (Pharmacology), a Masters in Bio-statistics and a number of additional qualifications in Clinical Research. Shahmy has received a number of prestigious Awards for his collaborative scientific works published in the highly rated peer reviewed indexed journals, such as President's Awards in 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 and 2019 , and National Research Council Merit awards in 2012-2014.He also awarded for a number of Travel Grants between 2010 to 2019 to present his collaborative research findings in the international research symposia.

Shahmy has over 12 years work experience in Business Operations in a multi-centre clinical research group and extensive experiences in research implementation and monitoring in the resource poor settings.

His research interests include Pharmacokinetics, Epidemiology, Data modeling and Cluster RCT intervention studies.

Primary Affiliation: SACTRC - Peradeniya, Central , Sri Lanka

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Experience

Oct 2018
Senior Scientist

NASTEC
Feb 2018
Research Manager/Fellow

DRU-Faculty of Medicine,University of Colombo
Jul 2010
Manager Operations-Clinical Research

SACTRC-University of Peradeniya
Sep 2009
Manager Logistics-Clinical Trials

SACTRC-University of Peradeniya
Jun 2005
Clinical Research Coordinator

SACTRC-University of Peradeniya

Publications

15Publications

931Reads

724Profile Views

78PubMed Central Citations

A pilot clinical study of the neuromuscular blocker rocuronium to reduce the duration of ventilation after organophosphorus insecticide poisoning.

Clin Toxicol (Phila) 2020 Apr 31;58(4):254-261. Epub 2019 Jul 31.

South Asian Clinical Toxicology Research Collaboration, Faculty of Medicine, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15563650.2019.1643467DOI Listing
April 2020
93 Reads
3.122 Impact Factor

Albuminuria and other renal damage biomarkers detect acute kidney injury soon after acute ingestion of oxalic acid and potassium permanganate.

Toxicol Lett 2018 Dec 6;299:182-190. Epub 2018 Oct 6.

South Asian Clinical Toxicology Research Collaboration, Faculty of Medicine, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka; Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology Research Group, Discipline of Pharmacology, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxlet.2018.10.002DOI Listing
December 2018
55 Reads
3.262 Impact Factor

Clinico-epidemiology of arthropod stings and bites in primary hospitals of North Western province of Sri Lanka.

Clin Toxicol (Phila) 2018 10 6;56(10):880-885. Epub 2018 Mar 6.

b South Asian Clinical Toxicology Research Collaboration , University of Peradeniya , Peradeniya , Sri Lanka.

Objective: Arthropod stinging and bites are common environmental hazards in Sri Lanka. However, their medical importance has not been fully evaluated yet. This study aims to study the burden, epidemiology, and outcome of stings and bites in primary hospitals in the Kurunegala district in North Western Province (NWP) of Sri Lanka.

Methodology: The study was conducted one year from 25th May 2013 to 25th May 2014. Details of all stings and bites admissions and their outcomes were retrospectively extracted from hospital records in all 44 primary hospitals in the district.

Results: There were 623 stings and bites with population incidence of 38/100,000 (95% CI 27-52). There were no deaths. Median age was 38 years (IQR: 19-53 years), and 351 (56%) were males. Most of stings and bites (75%) occurred in the daytime. Median time to hospital arrival was 55 minutes (IQR: 30 min to 2 h). The offending arthropods had been identified in 557 (89%) cases, of them, 357 (57%) were Hymenoptera (hornet and bees), 99 centipedes, 61 spiders and 40 scorpions. Local pain occurred in 346 (56%) cases - centipede 69 (70%), Scorpion 24 (60%), spider 36 (59%), Hymenoptera 187 (52%) and unidentified 30 (45%). Hymenoptera stings and spider bites occurred between 06 am to 12 noon, and scorpion stings and centipede bites mostly occurred between 06 pm to 12 midnight. Mild, moderate to severe anaphylaxis reactions occurred in 173 (28%) patients including 110 Hymenoptera stings - mild 39, moderate 62 and severe 9. From primary hospitals, 53(9%) cases had been transferred to tertiary care units for further management. Of them, 41 cases were Hymenoptera stings and 24 (58%) of them had mild, moderate to severe anaphylaxis. In the entire group, 27% severe cases received adrenaline.

Conclusions: The primary hospitals in NW province of Sri Lanka manage large numbers of arthropod stings and bites. These include Hymenoptera (hornet and bee), centipedes, spiders, and scorpions. Pain, swellings and anaphylactic reactions were the most common adverse effects.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15563650.2018.1447120DOI Listing
October 2018
191 Reads
2 Citations
3.122 Impact Factor

Serum creatinine and cystatin C provide conflicting evidence of acute kidney injury following acute ingestion of potassium permanganate and oxalic acid.

Clin Toxicol (Phila) 2017 Nov 23;55(9):970-976. Epub 2017 May 23.

a South Asian Clinical Toxicology Research Collaboration, Faculty of Medicine , University of Peradeniya , Peradeniya , Sri Lanka.

Aim: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common following deliberate self-poisoning with a combination washing powder containing oxalic acid (HCO) and potassium permanganate (KMnO). Early and rapid increases in serum creatinine (sCr) follow severe poisoning. We investigated the relationship of these increases with direct nephrotoxicity in an ongoing multicenter prospective cohort study in Sri Lanka exploring AKI following poisoning.

Methods: Multiple measures of change in kidney function were evaluated in 48 consenting patients who had serial sCr and serum cystatin C (sCysC) data available.

Results: Thirty-eight (38/48, 79%) patients developed AKI (AKIN criteria). Twenty-eight (58%) had AKIN stage 2 or 3. Initial increases in urine creatinine (uCr) excretion were followed by a substantial loss of renal function. The AKIN stage 2 and 3 (AKIN2/3) group had very rapid rises in sCr (a median of 118% at 24?h and by 400% at 72?h post ingestion). We excluded the possibility that the rapid rise resulted from the assay used or muscle damage. In contrast, the average sCysC increase was 65% by 72?h.

Conclusions: In most AKI, sCysC increases to the same extent but more rapidly than sCr, as sCysC has a shorter half-life. This suggests either a reduction in Cystatin C production or, conversely, that the rapid early rise of sCr results from increased production of creatine and creatinine to meet energy demands following severe oxidative stress mediated by HCO and KMnO. Increased early creatinine excretion supports the latter explanation, since creatinine excretion usually decreases transiently in AKIN2/3 from other causes.

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15563650.2017.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15563650.2017.1326607DOI Listing
November 2017
39 Reads
4 Citations
3.122 Impact Factor

A prospective cohort study of the effectiveness of the primary hospital management of all snakebites in Kurunegala district of Sri Lanka.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2017 Aug 21;11(8):e0005847. Epub 2017 Aug 21.

South Asian Clinical Toxicology Research Collaboration, Faculty of Medicine, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka.

Introduction: Sri Lanka records substantial numbers of snakebite annually. Primary rural hospitals are important contributors to health care. Health care planning requires a more detailed understanding of snakebite within this part of the health system. This study reports the management and epidemiology of all hospitalised snakebite in the Kurunegala district in Sri Lanka.

Methodology: The district has 44 peripheral/primary hospitals and a tertiary care hospital-Teaching Hospital, Kurunegala (THK). This prospective study was conducted over one year. All hospitals received copies of the current national guidelines on snakebite management. Clinical and demographic details of all snakebite admissions to primary hospitals were recorded by field researchers and validated by comparing with scanned copies of the medical record. Management including hospital transfers was independently assessed against the national guidelines recommendation. Population rates were calculated and compared with estimates derived from recent community based surveys.

Results: There were 2186 admissions of snakebites and no deaths in primary hospitals. An additional 401 patients from the district were admitted directly to the teaching hospital, 2 deaths were recorded in this group. The population incidence of hospitalized snakebite was 158/100,000 which was significantly lower than community survey estimates of 499/100,000. However there was no significant difference between the incidence of envenomation of 126/100,000 in hospitalised patients and 184/100,000 in the community survey. The utilisation of antivenom was appropriate and consistent with guidelines. Seventy patients received antivenom. Anaphylactic reactions to antivenom occurred in 22 patients, treatment reactions was considered to be outside the guidelines in 5 patients. Transfers from the primary hospital occurred in 399(18%) patients but the majority (341) did not meet the guideline criteria. A snake was identified in 978 cases; venomous snakebites included 823 hump-nosed viper (Hypnalespp), 61 Russell's viper, 14 cobra, 13 common krait, 03 saw scaled viper.

Conclusions: Primary hospitals received a significant number of snakebites that would be missed in surveys conducted in tertiary hospitals. Adherence to guidelines was good for the use of antivenom but not for hospital transfer or treatment of anaphylaxis. The large difference in snakebite incidence between community and hospital studies could possibly be due to non-envenomed patients not presenting. As the majority of snakebite management occurs in primary hospitals education and clinical support should be focused on that part of the health system.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0005847DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5578683PMC
August 2017
104 Reads
2 Citations
4.400 Impact Factor

Mechanism-specific injury biomarkers predict nephrotoxicity early following glyphosate surfactant herbicide (GPSH) poisoning.

Toxicol Lett 2016 Sep 7;258:1-10. Epub 2016 Jun 7.

South Asian Clinical Toxicology Research Collaboration, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka; TACT Research Group, Department of Pharmacology, SOMS, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxlet.2016.06.001DOI Listing
September 2016
52 Reads
2 Citations
3.262 Impact Factor

Population Pharmacokinetics of an Indian F(ab')2 Snake Antivenom in Patients with Russell's Viper (Daboia russelii) Bites.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2015 2;9(7):e0003873. Epub 2015 Jul 2.

South Asian Clinical Toxicology Research Collaboration (SACTRC), Faculty of Medicine, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka; Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya, Ragama, Sri Lanka.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0003873DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4489840PMC
May 2016
133 Reads
4 Citations

Venom Concentrations and Clotting Factor Levels in a Prospective Cohort of Russell's Viper Bites with Coagulopathy.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2015 21;9(8):e0003968. Epub 2015 Aug 21.

School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia; Hunter Haematology Research Group, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0003968DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4546603PMC
April 2016
27 Reads
3 Citations

Mechanisms underlying early rapid increases in creatinine in paraquat poisoning.

PLoS One 2015 27;10(3):e0122357. Epub 2015 Mar 27.

South Asian Clinical Toxicology Research Collaboration, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka; Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology Group, Professorial Medicine Unit, The Prince of Wales Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Department of Pharmacology, School of Medical Sciences, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0122357PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4376530PMC
February 2016
27 Reads
7 Citations
3.234 Impact Factor

Detection of venom after antivenom is not associated with persistent coagulopathy in a prospective cohort of Russell's viper (Daboia russelii) envenomings.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2014 Dec 18;8(12):e3304. Epub 2014 Dec 18.

School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia; Department of Clinical Toxicology and Pharmacology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia; South Asian Clinical Toxicology Research Collaboration (SACTRC), Faculty of Medicine, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0003304DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4270487PMC
December 2014
27 Reads
6 Citations

Immune response to snake envenoming and treatment with antivenom; complement activation, cytokine production and mast cell degranulation.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2013 25;7(7):e2326. Epub 2013 Jul 25.

Centre for Clinical Research in Emergency Medicine, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and the University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0002326DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3723557PMC
February 2014
61 Reads
12 Citations

Diagnostic 20-min whole blood clotting test in Russell's viper envenoming delays antivenom administration.

QJM 2013 Oct 14;106(10):925-32. Epub 2013 May 14.

Department of Clinical Toxicology and Pharmacology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Edith St, Waratah, NSW 2298, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/qjmed/hct102DOI Listing
October 2013
69 Reads
11 Citations

Hump-nosed pit viper (Hypnale hypnale) envenoming causes mild coagulopathy with incomplete clotting factor consumption.

Clin Toxicol (Phila) 2013 Aug;51(7):527-31

School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15563650.2013.811589DOI Listing
August 2013
29 Reads
7 Citations
3.122 Impact Factor

A randomised controlled trial of two infusion rates to decrease reactions to antivenom.

PLoS One 2012 18;7(6):e38739. Epub 2012 Jun 18.

Discipline of Clinical Pharmacology, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia.

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0038739PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3377702PMC
December 2012
16 Reads
15 Citations
3.234 Impact Factor

Comparison of two commonly practiced atropinization regimens in acute organophosphorus and carbamate poisoning, doubling doses vs. ad hoc: a prospective observational study.

Hum Exp Toxicol 2008 Jun;27(6):513-8

South Asian Clinical Toxicology Research Collaboration, Faculty of Medicine, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0960327108091861DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3145133PMC
June 2008
8 Reads
3 Citations
1.410 Impact Factor

Top co-authors

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University of Sydney

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