Publications by authors named "Seyed Mohammad Mehdi Aslani"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Comparison of surgical stress responses during spinal and general anesthesia in curettage surgery.

Anesth Pain Med 2014 Aug 13;4(3):e20554. Epub 2014 Aug 13.

Pain Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran ; Student Research Committee, Nursing and Midwifery School, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran.

Background: Response to the surgical stress is an involuntary response to metabolic, autonomic as well as hormonal changes that leads to heart rate and blood pressure fluctuations.

Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the effect of general versus spinal anesthesia on blood sugar level and hemodynamic changes in patients undergoing curettage surgery.

Patients And Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 50 patients who were candidate for elective curettage surgery were divided into two groups of general (n = 25) and spinal (n = 25) anesthesia. In both groups, blood glucose level was evaluated 10 minutes before, 20 and 60 minutes after initiation of anesthesia. Also, heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure were evaluated at 10 minutes before, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 minutes after intiation of anesthesia.

Results: There was not significantly difference between blood glucose level of both groups during 10 minutes before, 20 and 60 minutes after the intiation of anesthesia. Heart rate changes in the general and spinal groups compared to the baseline level were decreased up to maximum12.5% and 14.5%, respectively. The mean arterial pressure changes in the general and spinal groups compared to the baseline level were decreased up to maximum 5.4% and 8%, respectively.

Conclusions: Blood glucose and hemodynamic changes caused by surgical stress were not significantly different between two groups.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5812/aapm.20554DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4183098PMC
August 2014

The effect of single-dose administration of dexamethasone on postoperative pain in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

Anesth Pain Med 2014 Aug 13;4(3):e17872. Epub 2014 Aug 13.

Pain Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran ; Department of Anesthesiology, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran.

Background: Postoperative pain is considered as a reason of patient's delay in discharge and disability aggravation. Therefore, multimodal approaches have been suggested in order to mitigate pain and decrease postoperative side effects.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate analgesic effect of a single dose injection of dexamethasone on reducing postoperative pain in laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

Patients And Methods: In this double-blind, prospective study, 122 patients aged 18-60 years old, whom were selected for laparoscopic cholecystectomy, were classified into two case and control groups, and 61 patients were included in each group. The case (D) group underwent general anesthesia and a single- dose intravenous injection of dexamethasone. The Control (C) group received general anesthesia and intravenous injection of normal saline. Total dose of consumed meperidine and pain intensity during first 24 hours were evaluated in both groups.

Results: No significant difference existed between two groups regarding age, sex, weight and operation time. Pain intensity in group D was significantly less than group C (P < 0.01) after two, six and 12 hoursof surgery. No significant difference existed in pain intensity between two groups at the beginning of and 24 hours after the surgery (P > 0.05). Meperidine consumption in group D was significantly less than group C (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: Findings of present study showed that single dose of intravenous dexamethasone, led to less pain intensity and amounts of meperidine consumption, in comparison with placebo.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5812/aapm.17872DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4165022PMC
August 2014

Analgesic effect of low dose subcutaneous ketamine administration before and after cesarean section.

Iran Red Crescent Med J 2014 Mar 5;16(3):e15506. Epub 2014 Mar 5.

Pain Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, IR Iran ; Department of Anesthesiology, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, IR Iran.

Background: Pain is considered as an importantissue after cesarean section. Multimodal approach to post cesarean pain management may not only enhance analgesia but also reduce side effects after the surgery.

Objectives: This study was aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of subcutaneous injection of low dose ketamine at the incision site to reduce cesarean section pain.

Patients And Methods: Sixty patients, aged between 18 and 25 years old, scheduled for elective cesarean section, were enrolled to this double-blind randomized controlled trial study. Patients were divided into three groups of 20 patients each group one (k-pre) received 0.5 mg/kg ketamine before skin incision and normal saline after skin closure, group two (k-post) received normal saline before skin incision and 0.5 mg/kg ketamine after skin closure and group three (C) received normal saline before skin incision and after skin closure; subcutaneously at the incision site. The first analgesic request, the amount of analgesic and the pain intensity were evaluated for 24 hours.

Results: The first time analgesic requested was longer and the amount of analgesic used during the first 24 hours was significantly lower in groups K-pre and K-post compared with group C (P < 0.05). Pain intensity was significantly lower at 2, 4, 6 and 12 hours in groups K-pre and K-post compared with group C (P < 0.05). Nevertheless, pain intensity was not significantly different at 18 and 24 hours in group C (P > 0.05). The first requested time, total used amount of analgesicand pain intensity were not meaningfully different in K-pre and K-post groups (P > 0.05).

Conclusions: Patients who were given ketamine before or after cesarean section subcutaneously at incision site had lower pain intensity and less analgesic consumption than patients who were given placebo.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5812/ircmj.15506DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4005445PMC
March 2014