Publications by authors named "Seyed Mohammad Bagher Hashemi"

21 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Chemical composition, antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic activity of the essential oil from the leaves of Stachys pilifera Benth.

FEMS Microbiol Lett 2021 May;368(9)

Research Laboratories in Sciences Applied to Food, Canadian Irradiation Center, INRS-Armand Frappier, Health and Biotechnology Center, Institute of Nutrition and Functional Foods, Laval, QC, Canada.

Stachys pilifera Benth is an endemic species of Stachys family found in Iran with a wide application as an herbal tea. The objective of this research was to evaluate the antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic activity of the essential oil from the aerial parts of S. pilifera. Essential oil (EO) composition analysis showed that cis-Chrysanthenyl acetate (24.9%), viridiflorol (18.3%), trans-Caryophyllene (9.8%), caryophyllene oxide (4.6%), α-terpineol (3.3%) and linalool (3.1%) were the most abundant components. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the EO showed a higher antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus) than Gram-negative organisms (Escherichia coli, Shigella sonnei, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella enterica subsp. Enterica). The antioxidant activity of EO was studied using DPPH, FRAP and β-carotene/linoleic acid assays. IC50 for the DPPH, FRAP and β-carotene/linoleic acid tests were 23.2, 28.7 and 16.1 µg/mL, respectively, that it was higher than the results for BHT (P ≤ 0.05). The cytotoxic activity of the EO was evaluated using HT29 and HUVEC cells and it was observed that by increasing in EO concentration from 0.026 to 19.4 ug/mL, the viability of the cells for HT29 and HUVEC reduced to 6.8 and 7.1%, respectively. The results from this study suggest the possibility to use the essential oils from S. pilifera Benth as a natural preservative in processed or packaged food due to its high antibacterial, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/femsle/fnab050DOI Listing
May 2021

Sonication treatment of pomegranate juice containing and : Thermodynamic and predictive modeling after treatment and during shelf life.

Food Sci Technol Int 2021 Apr 14:10820132211009442. Epub 2021 Apr 14.

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Fasa University, Fasa, Iran.

The effect of ultrasound treatment (100 W, 30 kHz; 50 and 100% amplitudes) on inactivation of and in pomegranate juice and shelf life of the juice during storage at different temperatures (5, 15 and 30 °C) for 30 days was modeled using predictive and thermodynamics models. The Baranyi and square root type models were implemented to determine the growth rate of microorganisms. It was predicted that the minimum growth temperature () of increased by increasing sonication amplitude, however, the of was not function of sonication amplitude. The predicted shelf life was shown to be in good agreement with the measured sensorial shelf life. Increasing the temperature from 5 to 35 °C, reduced the shelf life from 17.5 to 3.5 days for and from 15 to 5 days for . Moreover, for , the activation energy () decreased from 43.4 to 27.5 kJ/mol by increasing the amplitude, while no significant change was observed for . Besides, thermodynamics properties of the shelf life such as enthalpy (), entropy () and Gibbs free energy ( were proven to be suitable measures to determine the microbial spoilage reaction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/10820132211009442DOI Listing
April 2021

Bioactive edible film based on Konjac glucomannan and probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum strains: Physicochemical properties and shelf life of fresh-cut kiwis.

J Food Sci 2021 Feb 7;86(2):513-522. Epub 2021 Jan 7.

Department of Food Science and Technology, College of Agriculture, Islamic Azad University of Fasa Branch, Fasa, Iran.

This study investigates the efficacy of Lactobacillus plantarum strains (L. plantarum LP3, L. plantarum AF1, and L. plantarum LU5) incorporated into a Konjac-based edible coating in order to prevent fungi growth and retain physicochemical characteristics of fresh-cut kiwis kept at 4 °C for 5 days. For this purpose, probiotic survivability, fungi counts, decay percentage, color changes, titratable acidity (TA), total soluble solids (TSS), ascorbic acid content, chlorophyll amount, total phenolics, and DPPH radical scavenging of fresh-cut kiwis were evaluated. Results indicated that the population of L. plantarum strains in all treated groups retained at sufficient amounts of probiotic consumption (above 6 and 7 log CFU/g) at the end of the storage period and L. plantarum LP3 had the highest viability in comparison to other strains. The incorporation of L. plantarum in Konjac coatings markedly reduced the amount of decay and color changes and maintained the chlorophyll and ascorbic acid contents of fresh-cut kiwis compared to control samples. After 5 days of storage, total phenol content and the DPPH antiradical activities of coated kiwi slices treated with probiotics were observed about 1.2 and 10.23 g/kg compared to the pure Konjac-coated (0.84 and 7.6 g/kg) and Konjac-uncoated samples (0.44 and 4.1 g/kg), respectively. No significant difference in TSS and TA of various treatments was detected. Coated kiwi slices loaded with probiotics had higher overall acceptability compared to Konjac-coated and control samples. In addition, probiotic treatment significantly reduced mold and yeast counts compared to the control group. PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS: Recently, edible films have received more consideration as a promising method to enhance the shelf life of fresh-cut fruit. The presence of probiotics in edible films reduces the growth of spoilage microorganisms and improves consumer health. Our findings encourage the application of edible coating incorporated with L. plantarum to design multifunctional foods and preserve the qualities of fresh-cut kiwifruit.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1750-3841.15568DOI Listing
February 2021

Antimicrobial activity of Jamzad and Bunge essential oils against and in table cream containing LU5.

Food Sci Nutr 2020 Nov 17;8(11):5907-5915. Epub 2020 Sep 17.

Department of Food Science and Technology Tarbiat Modares University Tehran Iran.

The essential oils (EOs) from Marzeh khuzestani ( Jamzad) and Marzeh bakhtiari ( Bunge) were analyzed and their antibacterial activities on and in probiotic table cream containing LU5 were evaluated. Carvacrol (86.5%) was the main component of Marzeh khuzestani, but thymol (33.5%), carvacrol (14.2%), borneol (13.4%), and linalool (11.5%) were the major constituents of Marzeh Bakhtiari EOs. Marzeh khuzestani exhibited the highest antibacterial/bactericidal activity on the tested bacteria. EOs combination showed no interaction on the but a synergism effect to inhibit the pathogen strains observed. Agar diffusion assay showed the highest inhibitory effect on (32.7 mm), (28.4 mm), and (24.7 mm) for the combination 2:1 Marzeh khuzestani:Marzeh Bakhtiari ( ≤ .05). The antibacterial activity of mixture of EOs in creams was evaluated and the sample contained of 1%k + 1%b showed the highest antibacterial activity after day 10 of storage (by lowering the number of , and to 2.3, 1.9, and 1.4 log CFU/g compared to control sample). Overall acceptability of creams slightly decreased by the increase in EOs addition and the highest acceptability score of 7.9 observed for the sample contained 0.5%k + 0.5%b EOs. However, all treatments exhibited a high acceptance level that it confirms that the addition of EOs mixture had no effect on the sensorial attributes of the creams. The combination of tested EOs can be used as an antimicrobial agent in probiotic food products containing .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/fsn3.1871DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7684589PMC
November 2020

Lactic acid production - producing microorganisms and substrates sources-state of art.

Heliyon 2020 Oct 12;6(10):e04974. Epub 2020 Oct 12.

Department of Food Science and Technology, College of Agriculture, Fasa University, Fasa, Iran.

Lactic acid is an organic compound produced via fermentation by different microorganisms that are able to use different carbohydrate sources. Lactic acid bacteria are the main bacteria used to produce lactic acid and among these, spp. have been showing interesting fermentation capacities. The use of spp. revealed good possibilities to reduce the fermentative costs. Interestingly, lactic acid high productivity was achieved by and mainly after engineering genetic modification. Fungi, like spp. can metabolize different renewable carbon resources, with advantageously amylolytic properties to produce lactic acid. Additionally, yeasts can tolerate environmental restrictions (for example acidic conditions), being the wild-type low lactic acid producers that have been improved by genetic manipulation. Microalgae and cyanobacteria, as photosynthetic microorganisms can be an alternative lactic acid producer without carbohydrate feed costs. For lactic acid production, it is necessary to have substrates in the fermentation medium. Different carbohydrate sources can be used, from plant waste as molasses, starchy, lignocellulosic materials as agricultural and forestry residues. Dairy waste also can be used by the addition of supplementary components with a nitrogen source.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heliyon.2020.e04974DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7566098PMC
October 2020

The efficacy of edible film from Konjac glucomannan and saffron petal extract to improve shelf life of fresh-cut cucumber.

Food Sci Nutr 2020 Jul 27;8(7):3128-3137. Epub 2020 May 27.

Department of Food Science and Technology College of Agriculture Islamic Azad University of Fasa Branch Fars Iran.

The efficacy of saffron petal extract (SPE; 1%-4%) incorporated into Konjac glucomannan (KGM) edible films on the quality and shelf life of fresh-cut cucumbers was evaluated. Changes in chemical, physical, and microbial properties, antioxidant activity, and total soluble phenolic contents of sliced cucumbers during storage at 4°C for 5 days were investigated. Results showed that the addition of SPE markedly reduced the water vapor permeability features of produced films, whereas the moisture content and transparency of them increased ( < .05). All the formulated films containing 1%-4% of SPE exhibited significant antimicrobial properties against the examined pathogens (, , Typhi, and ) both in vitro and in vivo conditions. KGM films incorporated SPE were successful in reducing mesophilic bacteria and fungi populations so that the microbial load significantly decreased as the concentrations of SPE increased and KGM + 4% of SPE was considered as the most effective treatment in decreasing the microbial content of sliced cucumbers. Total soluble solids of the treated cucumbers were significantly increased at the end of the storage in refrigerator, compared to the control sample. Moreover, antioxidant activity (DPPH assay) and total soluble phenols in treated fruit increased with storage time, while these parameters decreased with increasing concentrations of SPE incorporated into KGM film. So according to the findings, the introduced film with KGM and SPE could be considered as an edible film and be applied to preserve the fruit and vegetables quality and extend the shelf life of sliced cucumbers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/fsn3.1544DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7382154PMC
July 2020

The combined effects of ultrasound and lactic acid in inactivating microorganisms on fresh radish ( subsp. ): Microbiological and quality changes.

Food Sci Nutr 2020 Jan 28;8(1):162-169. Epub 2019 Nov 28.

Department of Food Science Faculty of Food Engineering University of Campinas (UNICAMP) Campinas Brazil.

In order to reduce the risk of microbial contamination in fresh radish (Raphanus raphanistrum) and ensure its safety, combined effects of ultrasound and lactic acid in inactivating microorganisms and quality changes of radish were studied. Fresh radish samples were inoculated with , , , and separately and were treated with lactic acid (L) 1% and 2%, ultrasound (U) with the amplitude of 0%, 25%, 50%, and 75% for 15 and 30 min and their combination. The quality parameters, including total phenol content, firmness, and total color change, were evaluated on the day of the experiment and after 24 hr of cold storage. Results showed that both applied treatments and their combinations had significant ( < .05) inhibitory effect on all of the studied bacteria. Total phenolic content of the ultrasound treated samples led to higher amounts comparing to other samples. Results showed that using ultrasound power (75%), for 30 min significantly ( < .05) decreased the firmness of samples after 24 hr of cold storage. In conclusion, the application of ultrasound and lactic acid can extend the shelf life of fresh radish.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/fsn3.1287DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6977513PMC
January 2020

Application of microwave and ohmic heating for pasteurization of cantaloupe juice: microbial inactivation and chemical properties.

J Sci Food Agric 2019 Jul 27;99(9):4276-4286. Epub 2019 Mar 27.

Department of Food Science and Technology, College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran.

Background: Cantaloupe melon (Cucumis melo L.) is one of the most important dessert fruits and is cultivated in many countries of the world. The effects of microwave (400 and 800 W for 110 s), ohmic (100 and 200 V for 110 s) and conventional heating (27-75 °C for 30 min) treatments on inactivation of Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis and Staphylococcus aureus pathogens; pH and degradation of vitamin C, β-carotene and phenolic compounds of cantaloupe juice were investigated.

Results: As time passed, all of the treatments resulted in significant (P ≤ 0.05) decreases in the number of pathogens and vitamin C, β-carotene and phenolic compound content, whereas the pH of samples did not show significant changes. The mentioned parameters were more reduced by increasing the power, voltage and temperature of ohmic, microwave and conventional heating treatments, respectively. Comparison of the results for conventional heating with those of ohmic and microwave heating revealed that the complete inactivation time of pathogens by the two latter treatments was much shorter than that of the former. After 20 s, the effect of ohmic heating at 200 V on decreasing vitamin C content was significantly (P ≤ 0.05) higher than that of the other treatments. The amounts of β-carotene and phenolic compounds showed the most reduction under 800 W microwave treatment.

Conclusion: The results obtained for conventional, ohmic and microwave heating treatments indicated a higher degradation of β-carotene and phenolic compounds and a lower loss of vitamin C in the former. © 2019 Society of Chemical Industry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.9660DOI Listing
July 2019

Effects of sucrose, isomalt and maltodextrin on microstructural, thermal, pasting and textural properties of wheat and cassava starch gel.

Int J Biol Macromol 2018 Dec 26;120(Pt B):1935-1943. Epub 2018 Sep 26.

University of Gastronomic Sciences, Bra, Italy.

This study investigated the effect of different levels (4, 8 and 12%) of sucrose, isomalt and maltodextrin on the microstructural, water absorption, physico-chemical, thermal and textural characteristics of wheat and cassava starch gels, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), rapid visco analysis (RVA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and texture profile analysis. According to SEM analysis, cassava granules were more impressed than wheat starch in the presence of isomalt > sucrose > maltodextrin. Results showed that water absorption decreased when the amount of sucrose, isomalt and maltodextrin increased. In contrast, onset (T), peak (T) and conclusion (T) temperature, and enthalpy (ΔH) of wheat and cassava starch gels, increased as the level of addition increased. With increasing the sugar concentration, T, T, T and ΔH gel enhanced significantly relative to the native starch. The polyols had more remarkable effects on the thermal properties of cassava starch than wheat starch. The texture of wheat and cassava starch gels incorporated with polyol sugars had solid-like properties. The gelatinization of starch was delayed more by isomalt than sucrose and maltodextrin. Moreover, the combination of principal component analysis and cluster analysis proved to be a suitable statistical approach to highlight the effect of adding varying levels of polyols to starch.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2018.09.172DOI Listing
December 2018

Efficacy of Antimicrobial Agents for Food Contact Applications: Biological Activity, Incorporation into Packaging, and Assessment Methods: A Review.

J Food Prot 2018 07;81(7):1142-1156

4 Department of Food Environmental and Nutritional Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan 20123, Italy (ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-4739-4751 [S.L.]).

Interest in the utilization of antimicrobial active packaging for food products has increased in recent years. Antimicrobial active packaging involves the incorporation of antimicrobial compounds into packaging materials, with the aim of maintaining or extending food quality and shelf life. Plant extracts, essential oils, organic acids, bacteriocins, inorganic substances, enzymes, and proteins are used as antimicrobial agents in active packaging. Evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of packaging materials using different methods has become a critical issue for both food safety and the commercial utilization of such packaging technology. This article reviews the different types of antimicrobial agents used for active food packaging materials, the main incorporation techniques, and the assessment methods used to examine the antimicrobial activity of packaging materials, taking into account their safety as food contact materials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-17-509DOI Listing
July 2018

Characterizations and rheological study of the purified polysaccharide extracted from quince seeds.

J Sci Food Agric 2019 Jan 20;99(1):143-151. Epub 2018 Jul 20.

Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.

Background: The functional characteristics of hydrocolloids are mainly dependent on their physicochemical properties. Thus, it is essential to characterize the new sources of hydrocolloids.

Results: Quince seed gum (QSG) is a high-molecular-weight polysaccharide (9.61 × 10  g mol ) composed of 85.04 ± 2.87% carbohydrate (6.39% l-arabinose, 40.43% d-xylose, 5.60% d-galactose, 5.75% d-glucose and 31.11% d-mannose), 13.16 ± 1.73% uronic acid, 5.77 ± 0.83% moisture, 2.78 ± 0.21% protein, 5.64 ± 0.21% ash, and 0.75 ± 0.09% fat. Our findings indicated that this gum could be introduced as a value-added by-product in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy suggested a highly substituted xylan structure for QSG. In the dilute regime, an increase in the ion concentration was accompanied by a decrease in intrinsic viscosity of QSG. When the salt concentration increased from 0 to 50 mmol L , the consistency coefficient (as a measure of apparent viscosity) declined. On the other hand, with further increasing of salt concentration, the consistency coefficient (as a measure of apparent viscosity) values increased. Similarly, the G' and G″ values for 10 and 50 mmol L calcium chloride concentrations were less than in control samples.

Conclusion: The rheological behavior of the QSG studied in this paper can provide insight into its potential application in food and pharmaceutical industries. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.9155DOI Listing
January 2019

Recent advancements in lactic acid production - a review.

Food Res Int 2018 05 4;107:763-770. Epub 2018 Jan 4.

Fasa University, College of Agriculture, Food Science and Technology Department, Fasa, Iran.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodres.2018.01.001DOI Listing
May 2018

Chemical properties and oxidative stability of Arjan (Amygdalus reuteri) kernel oil as emerging edible oil.

Food Res Int 2018 05 5;107:378-384. Epub 2018 Feb 5.

Nutrition and Food Science Area, Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Food Science, Toxicology and Forensic Medicine Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universitat de València, Avda. Vicent Andrés Estellés, s/n 46100 Burjassot, València, Spain. Electronic address:

The oxidative stability, as well as the chemical composition of Amygdalus reuteri kernel oil (ARKO), were evaluated and compared to those of Amygdalus scoparia kernel oil (ASKO) and extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) during and after holding in the oven (170 °C for 8 h). The oxidative stability analysis was carried out by measuring the changes in conjugated dienes, carbonyl and acid values as well as oil/oxidative stability index and their correlation with the antioxidant compounds (tocopherol, polyphenols, and sterol compounds). The oleic acid was determined as the predominant fatty acid of ARKO (65.5%). Calculated oxidizability value and an iodine value of ARKO, ASKO and EVOO were reported as 3.29 and 3.24, 2.00 and 100.0, 101.4 and 81.9, respectively. Due to the high wax content (4.5% and 3.3%, respectively), the saponification number of ARKO and ASKO (96.4 and 99.8, respectively) was lower than that of EVOO (169.7). ARKO had the highest oxidative stability, followed by ASKO and EVOO. Therefore, ARKO can be introduced as a new source of edible oil with high oxidative stability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodres.2018.02.002DOI Listing
May 2018

Effect of ultrasound on lactic acid production by Lactobacillus strains in date (Phoenix dactylifera var. Kabkab) syrup.

Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2018 Mar 9;102(6):2635-2644. Epub 2018 Feb 9.

QOPNA, Chemistry Department, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193, Aveiro, Portugal.

Date syrup is rich in fermentable sugars and may be used as a substrate for different microbial fermentations, including lactic acid fermentation processes. The beneficial effects of ultrasounds (US) on bioprocesses have been reported for several microorganisms, due to the enhancement of cell growth, as well as improvements in yields and productivities. Therefore, US treatments (30 kHz, 100 W, 10-30 min) were applied to two lactobacilli (Lactobacillus helveticus PTCC 1332 and Lactobacillus acidophilus PTCC 1643), during fermentation using date syrup as substrate. The effects on lactic acid fermentation were evaluated by analyzing cell growth (dry cell weight and viable cell count), substrate consumption (quantification of glucose and fructose), and product formation (quantification of lactic acid) over time. The effects of US were also evaluated on cell membrane permeability. Both lactobacilli were able to grow well on date syrup without the need for addition of further ingredients. The US effects were highly dependent on treatment duration: treatments of 10- and 20-min stimulated lactobacilli growth, while the treatment extension to 30 min negatively affected cell growth. Similarly, the 10- and 20-min treatments increased sugar consumption and lactic acid production, contrarily to the 30-min treatment. All US treatments increased cell membrane permeability, with a more pronounced effect at more extended treatments. The results of this work showed that application of appropriate US treatments could be a useful tool for stimulation of lactic acid production from date syrup, as well as for other fermentative processes that use date syrup as substrate.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-018-8789-8DOI Listing
March 2018

Fermentation of sarshir (kaymak) by lactic acid bacteria: antibacterial activity, antioxidant properties, lipid and protein oxidation and fatty acid profile.

J Sci Food Agric 2017 Oct 28;97(13):4595-4603. Epub 2017 Apr 28.

University Lille 1 Sciences and Technologies, Charles Viollette Institute, Cité Scientifique, France.

Background: The antioxidant and antibacterial activities of fermented sarshir (traditional dairy food), with three probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum strains (LP3, AF1, and LU5), were investigated. The oxidative stability and the lipid profile of non-fermented and fermented sarshir were compared, in addition to radical scavenging activity, as well as peroxide, anisidine and carbonyl values (PV, AnV and CV, respectively).

Results: The strong antibacterial activity of fermented sarshir against common pathogenic bacteria, including Gram-negative Escherichia coli O157: H7 ATCC 35150 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, as well as Gram-positive Bacillus cereus ATCC 10876 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, was established. Among the strains examined, L. plantarum LP3 exhibited the highest radical scavenging activity (53.1 ± 1.8%) and lowest PV (3.0 meq kg ), AnV (1.31 ± 0.06) and CV (1.4 ± 0.08). The pH of sarshir decreased from 6.2 ± 0 to 3.5 ± 0.1 during 14 h of fermentation. Incorporated bacterial cells exhibited notable viability during 10 days of cold storage (4 °C).

Conclusion: The fermentation of sarshir by L. plantarum strains, especially LP3, resulted in beneficial changes in radical scavenging activity, as well as PV, AnV and carbonyl values, in addition to a broad spectrum of inhibitory activity against strains of P. aeruginosa, E. coli O157:H7, B. cereus and S. aureus. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.8329DOI Listing
October 2017

Novel edible oil sources: Microwave heating and chemical properties.

Food Res Int 2017 02 3;92:147-153. Epub 2016 Dec 3.

Department of Food Science and Technology, College of Agriculture, Fasa University, Fasa, Iran.

The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of various microwave heating times (1, 3, 5, 10, and 15min) on the chemical properties of novel edible oil sources, including Mashhadi melon (Cucumis melo var. Iranians cv. Mashhadi), Iranian watermelon (Citrullus lanatus cv. Fire Fon), pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo subsp. pepo var. Styriaca), and yellow apple (Malus domestica cv. Golden Delicious) seed oils. The evaluated parameters were peroxide value (PV), conjugated diene (CD) and triene (CT) values, carbonyl value (CV), p-anisidine value (AnV), oil stability index (OSI), radical scavenging activity (RSA), total tocopherols, total phenolics, as well as chlorophyll and carotenoid contents. Results showed that extended microwave heating involves decreased quality of the seed oils, mainly due to the formation of primary and secondary oxidation products. Microwave heating time also affects the total contents of chlorophylls, carotenoids, phenolics and tocopherols, which clearly decrease by increasing the exposure time. The order of oxidative stability of the analyzed edible oils was pumpkin>Mashhadi melon>Iranian watermelon>yellow apple. The obtained results demonstrated the promising potential of these novel edible oils for different food applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodres.2016.11.033DOI Listing
February 2017

Current advances in biological production of propionic acid.

Biotechnol Lett 2017 May 1;39(5):635-645. Epub 2017 Feb 1.

Sorbonne Universités, Université de Technologie de Compiègne, Laboratoire Transformations Intégrées de la Matière Renouvelable (UTC/ESCOMEA 4297 TIMR), Centre de Recherche de Royallieu, CS 60319, 60203, Compiègne Cedex, France.

Propionic acid and its derivatives are considered "Generally Recognized As Safe" food additives and are generally used as an anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory agent, herbicide, and artificial flavor in diverse industrial applications. It is produced via biological pathways using Propionibacterium and some anaerobic bacteria. However, its commercial chemical synthesis from the petroleum-based feedstock is the conventional production process bit results in some environmental issues. Novel biological approaches using microorganisms and renewable biomass have attracted considerable recent attention due to economic advantages as well as great adaptation with the green technology. This review provides a comprehensive overview of important biotechnological aspects of propionic acid production using recent technologies such as employment of co-culture, genetic and metabolic engineering, immobilization technique and efficient bioreactor systems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10529-017-2293-6DOI Listing
May 2017

The Effects of Amplitudes Ultrasound-Assisted Solvent Extraction and Pretreatment Time on the Yield and Quality of Pistacia Khinjuk Hull Oil.

J Oleo Sci 2016 Sep 29;65(9):733-8. Epub 2016 Jul 29.

Department of Food Science and Technology, College of Agriculture, Fasa University.

In this study, the effect of three amplitudes of ultrasound-assisted solvent extraction (UASE) (0, 25 and 50 %; 100 W, 30 kHz; the 0% treatment serving as control) on yield and quality of extracted oil from P. khinjuk hull at various pretreatment times (15, 30 and 45 min) was evaluated. The highest oil yields at the three amplitude levels tested were 24.4, 29.8 and 37.8% for 0, 25 and 50 %, respectively. Although increase in pretreatment time increased oil yield, pretreatment time at 30 and 45 min did not significantly different for both 25 and 50% amplitude. Furthermore, UASE did not significantly affect fatty acid composition, peroxide value (PV), conjugated diene value (CDV) and anisidine value (AnV) of extracted oils. UASE also increased tocopherols and tocoterienols content of oils but pretreatment time at 30 and 45 min did not significantly different for them. Therefore, UASE increase yield and quality of extracted oil and reduce extraction time. All these advantages make UASE a good substitute for the extraction of oil.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5650/jos.ess15252DOI Listing
September 2016

Synbiotic potential of Doogh supplemented with free and encapsulated Lactobacillus plantarum LS5 and Helianthus tuberosus inulin.

J Food Sci Technol 2015 Jul 11;52(7):4579-85. Epub 2014 Aug 11.

Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Payame Noor University, Mashhad, Iran.

The survival and effect of free and encapsulated probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum LS5 on acidity, exopolysaccharide production, phase separation and influence on the sensory attributes of probiotic and synbiotic Doogh (typical Iranian drink based on fermented milk) supplemented with Helianthus tuberosus inulin were studied over 22 days storage. Results showed addition of L.plantarum LS5 (free or encapsulated) increased acid development (°D) in Doogh during storage. In addition, phase separation in Doogh with encapsulated probiotic bacteria was slower compared to Doogh with free probiotic bacteria. More exopolysaccharides were observed in Doogh with encapsulated culture compared to those without encapsulated culture. The results confirmed that there was an increased survival of L.plantarum LS5 due to protection of cells by microencapsulation. Also addition of inulin improved survival of free or encapsulated cells in Doogh during storage, but effect of inulin on acidity, exoploysaccharide content and phase separation of samples containing free or encapsulated cells was not significant (P > 0.05). Moreover, sensory evaluation results indicated addition of free or encapsulated probiotic cells and inulin did not significantly affect appearance and color, acidity, flavor and after taste of the Doogh samples over the storage period. Therefore, probiotic and synbiotic Doogh (supplemented with free or encapsulated L.plantarum LS5 and Helianthus tuberosus inulin) are potentially suitable for using as functional dairy foods.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13197-014-1511-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4486574PMC
July 2015

Kolkhoung () Hull Oil and Kernel Oil as Antioxidative Vegetable Oils with High Oxidative Stability 
and Nutritional Value.

Food Technol Biotechnol 2015 Mar;53(1):81-86

Department of Food Science and Technology, College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran.

In this study, in order to introduce natural antioxidative vegetable oil in food industry, the kolkhoung hull oil and kernel oil were extracted. To evaluate their antioxidant efficiency, gas chromatography analysis of the composition of kolkhoung hull and kernel oil fatty acids and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of tocopherols were done. Also, the oxidative stability of the oil was considered based on the peroxide value and anisidine value during heating at 100, 110 and 120 °C. Gas chromatography analysis showed that oleic acid was the major fatty acid of both types of oil (hull and kernel) and based on a low content of saturated fatty acids, high content of monounsaturated fatty acids, and the ratio of ω-6 and ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, they were nutritionally well--balanced. Moreover, both hull and kernel oil showed high oxidative stability during heating, which can be attributed to high content of tocotrienols. Based on the results, kolkhoung hull oil acted slightly better than its kernel oil. However, both of them can be added to oxidation-sensitive oils to improve their shelf life.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.17113/ftb.53.01.15.3719DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5068431PMC
March 2015

Potentially probiotic Lactobacillus strains from traditional Kurdish cheese.

Probiotics Antimicrob Proteins 2014 Mar;6(1):22-31

Department of Food Science and Technology, College of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran,

In this study, the probiotic potential of Lactobacillus strains isolated from traditional Kurdish cheese was investigated. The Lactobacillus strains were examined for resistance to gastric acidity and bile toxicity, antimicrobial activities, autoaggregation, coaggregation, hydrophobicity, adhesion to Caco-2 cells, and antibiotic susceptibility. The results showed that all strains tested tolerate acid gastric conditions (pH 2.0 and 3.0), and all of them were bile resistant (at 0.3 and 1% concentration). Although no antibacterial activity was detected in vitro assay for the treated (neutralized to pH 6.5 and treated with catalase) cell-free culture supernatant (CFCS) of strains, untreated CFCS showed strong antagonistic activity against two known pathogens bacteria. All strains exhibited a strong autoaggregating phenotype and manifested a high degree of coaggregation with pathogens. On the other hand, majority of studied strains were found sensitive to different antibiotics, such as ampicillin, penicillin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, rifampicin, and tetracycline, and were resistant to vancomycin and streptomycin. Finally, isolated strains showed good hydrophobicity and adherence to Caco-2 cell line, so they could be exploited for food manufacture.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12602-014-9155-5DOI Listing
March 2014