Publications by authors named "Seyed Hamid Zoljalali Moghaddam"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effectiveness of rectal displacement devices in managing prostate motion: a systematic review.

Strahlenther Onkol 2021 Feb 22;197(2):97-115. Epub 2020 May 22.

Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, Ardabil University of Medical Sciences, Ardabil, Iran.

Purpose: To determine whether rectal displacement devices (RDDs) have a prostate-stabilizing effect during prostate external beam radiotherapy (EBRT).

Methods: A systematic literature search using the PubMed database from January 1, 2000 to December 30th, 2019 was conducted. The effect of RDDs on inter- and intra-fractional prostate displacements was extracted.

Results: From 356 articles identified via the PubMed database and hand search, 21 articles were included in the systematic review. There was no randomized study. Twelve studies evaluated the role of the endorectal balloon (ERB) in managing prostate motion. Four studies reported the effect of hydrogel spacer on prostate motion. Four studies examined the effect of the rectal retractor (RR) on intra-fractional prostate motion, and only one study assessed the impact of ProSpare (Nottinghamshire, UK) in reducing prostate motion.

Conclusion: Using an ERB significantly reduces intra-fractional prostate motion. This prostate-stabilizing effect of the ERB can translate into reduced planning target volume (PTV) margins and additional rectal dose sparing. Even with an ERB in place, inter-fractional prostate displacements are seen. As a consequence, ERB application does not obviate daily verification; however, this is not a crucial topic because pretreatment imaging is always done nowadays. As compared with ERB, the hydrogel spacer significantly reduces rectal dose and toxicity without influencing prostate immobilization. The RR can increase prostate and rectal inter- and intra-fractional stability without a clear influence on the reduction of rectal toxicity. Finally, it is unclear whether ProSpare is a suitable device reducing prostate motion. Further study will be required to clarify whether the prostate-stabilizing effects of the ERB and RR can result in a safe reduction of PTV margins and further sparing of organs at risks, especially the rectum.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00066-020-01633-9DOI Listing
February 2021

CT imaging markers to improve radiation toxicity prediction in prostate cancer radiotherapy by stacking regression algorithm.

Radiol Med 2020 Jan 24;125(1):87-97. Epub 2019 Sep 24.

Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Purpose: Radiomic features, clinical and dosimetric factors have the potential to predict radiation-induced toxicity. The aim of this study was to develop prediction models of radiotherapy-induced toxicities in prostate cancer patients based on computed tomography (CT) radiomics, clinical and dosimetric parameters.

Methods: In this prospective study, prostate cancer patients were included, and radiotherapy-induced urinary and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were assessed by Common Terminology Criteria for adverse events. For each patient, clinical and dose volume parameters were obtained. Imaging features were extracted from pre-treatment rectal and bladder wall CT scan of patients. Stacking algorithm and elastic net penalized logistic regression were used in order to feature selection and prediction, simultaneously. The models were fitted by imaging (radiomics model) and clinical/dosimetric (clinical model) features alone and in combinations (clinical-radiomics model). Goodness of fit of the models and performance of classifications were assessed using Hosmer and Lemeshow test, - 2log (likelihood) and area under curve (AUC) of the receiver operator characteristic.

Results: Sixty-four prostate cancer patients were studied, and 33 and 52 patients developed ≥ grade 1 GI and urinary toxicities, respectively. In GI modeling, the AUC for clinical, radiomics and clinical-radiomics models was 0.66, 0.71 and 0.65, respectively. To predict urinary toxicity, the AUC for radiomics, clinical and clinical-radiomics models was 0.71, 0.67 and 0.77, respectively.

Conclusions: We have shown that CT imaging features could predict radiation toxicities and combination of imaging and clinical/dosimetric features may enhance the predictive performance of radiotoxicity modeling.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11547-019-01082-0DOI Listing
January 2020

Cancer stem cells: A review from origin to therapeutic implications.

J Cell Physiol 2020 02 8;235(2):790-803. Epub 2019 Jul 8.

Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also known as tumor-initiating cells (TICs), are elucidated as cells that can perpetuate themselves via autorestoration. These cells are highly resistant to current therapeutic approaches and are the main reason for cancer recurrence. Radiotherapy has made a lot of contributions to cancer treatment. However, despite continuous achievements, therapy resistance and tumor recurrence are still prevalent in most patients. This resistance might be partly related to the existence of CSCs. In the present study, recent advances in the investigation of different biological properties of CSCs, such as their origin, markers, characteristics, and targeting have been reviewed. We have also focused our discussion on radioresistance and adaptive responses of CSCs and their related extrinsic and intrinsic influential factors. In summary, we suggest CSCs as the prime therapeutic target for cancer treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcp.29044DOI Listing
February 2020