Publications by authors named "Serhiy Chumachenko"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Keeping weight off: Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction alters amygdala functional connectivity during weight loss maintenance in a randomized control trial.

PLoS One 2021 11;16(1):e0244847. Epub 2021 Jan 11.

Department of Psychiatry, UMass Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States of America.

Obesity is associated with significant comorbidities and financial costs. While behavioral interventions produce clinically meaningful weight loss, weight loss maintenance is challenging. The objective was to improve understanding of the neural and psychological mechanisms modified by mindfulness that may predict clinical outcomes. Individuals who intentionally recently lost weight were randomized to Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) or a control healthy living course. Anthropometric and psychological factors were measured at baseline, 8 weeks and 6 months. Functional connectivity (FC) analysis was performed at baseline and 8 weeks to examine FC changes between regions of interest selected a priori, and independent components identified by independent component analysis. The association of pre-post FC changes with 6-month weight and psychometric outcomes was then analyzed. Significant group x time interaction was found for FC between the amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex, such that FC increased in the MBSR group and decreased in controls. Non-significant changes in weight were observed at 6 months, where the mindfulness group maintained their weight while the controls showed a weight increase of 3.4% in BMI. Change in FC at 8-weeks between ventromedial prefrontal cortex and several ROIs was associated with change in depression symptoms but not weight at 6 months. This pilot study provides preliminary evidence of neural mechanisms that may be involved in MBSR's impact on weight loss maintenance that may be useful for designing future clinical trials and mechanistic studies.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0244847PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7799782PMC
January 2021

Altered Resting State Brain Networks and Cognition in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis.

medRxiv 2020 Nov 4. Epub 2020 Nov 4.

Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutation of the APC gene presenting with numerous colorectal adenomatous polyps and a near 100% risk of colon cancer. Preliminary research findings from our group indicate that FAP patients experience significant deficits across many cognitive domains. In the current study, fMRI brain metrics in a FAP population and matched controls were used to further the mechanistic understanding of reported cognitive deficits. This research identified and characterized any possible differences in resting brain networks and associations between neural network changes and cognition from 34 participants (18 FAP patients, 16 healthy controls). Functional connectivity analysis was performed using FSL with independent component analysis (ICA) to identify functional networks. Significant differences between cases and controls were observed in 8 well-established resting state networks. With the addition of an aggregate cognitive measure as a covariate, these differences were virtually non-existent, indicating a strong correlation between cognition and brain activity at the network level. The data indicate robust and pervasive effects on functional neural network activity among FAP patients and these effects are likely involved in cognitive deficits associated with this disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/2020.11.02.20224477DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7654920PMC
November 2020

The role of anxiety in the integrative memory model.

Behav Brain Sci 2020 01 3;42:e293. Epub 2020 Jan 3.

Division of Geriatric Psychiatry, McLean Hospital, Belmont, MA02478.

We suggest that the inclusion of anxiety, as one relevant mood factor, could enhance the implementation of the integrative memory model in research and the clinic. The role of anxiety in Alzheimer's disease neuroanatomy, symptomology, and progression is used as an example. Customization of the integrative memory model can establish strong foundations for pathology-specific models of memory deficits, enhancing the development of precision medicine applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0140525X19001900DOI Listing
January 2020

Brain cortical thickness in male adolescents with serious substance use and conduct problems.

Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse 2015 ;41(5):414-24

a University of Colorado School of Medicine , Aurora , CO .

Background: Adolescents with substance use disorder (SUD) and conduct problems exhibit high levels of impulsivity and poor self-control. Limited work to date tests for brain cortical thickness differences in these youths.

Objectives: To investigate differences in cortical thickness between adolescents with substance use and conduct problems and controls.

Methods: We recruited 25 male adolescents with SUD, and 19 male adolescent controls, and completed structural 3T magnetic resonance brain imaging. Using the surface-based morphometry software FreeSurfer, we completed region-of-interest (ROI) analyses for group cortical thickness differences in left, and separately right, inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and insula. Using FreeSurfer, we completed whole-cerebrum analyses of group differences in cortical thickness.

Results: Versus controls, the SUD group showed no cortical thickness differences in ROI analyses. Controlling for age and IQ, no regions with cortical thickness differences were found using whole-cerebrum analyses (though secondary analyses co-varying IQ and whole-cerebrum cortical thickness yielded a between-group cortical thickness difference in the left posterior cingulate/precuneus). Secondary findings showed that the SUD group, relative to controls, demonstrated significantly less right > left asymmetry in IFG, had weaker insular-to-whole-cerebrum cortical thickness correlations, and showed a positive association between conduct disorder symptom count and cortical thickness in a superior temporal gyrus cluster.

Conclusion: Functional group differences may reflect a more nuanced cortical morphometric difference than ROI cortical thickness. Further investigation of morphometric differences is needed. If replicable findings can be established, they may aid in developing improved diagnostic or more targeted treatment approaches.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00952990.2015.1058389DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4900688PMC
June 2016

Reversal of established traumatic brain injury-induced, anxiety-like behavior in rats after delayed, post-injury neuroimmune suppression.

J Neurotrauma 2014 Mar 20;31(5):487-97. Epub 2013 Nov 20.

1 Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado , Boulder, Colorado.

Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases the risk of neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly anxiety disorders. Yet, there are presently no therapeutic interventions to prevent the development of post-traumatic anxiety or effective treatments once it has developed. This is because, in large part, of a lack of understanding of the underlying pathophysiology. Recent research suggests that chronic neuroinflammatory responses to injury may play a role in the development of post-traumatic anxiety in rodent models. Acute peri-injury administration of immunosuppressive compounds, such as Ibudilast (MN166), have been shown to prevent reactive gliosis associated with immune responses to injury and also prevent lateral fluid percussion injury (LFPI)-induced anxiety-like behavior in rats. There is evidence in both human and rodent studies that post-traumatic anxiety, once developed, is a chronic, persistent, and drug-refractory condition. In the present study, we sought to determine whether neuroinflammation is associated with the long-term maintenance of post-traumatic anxiety. We examined the efficacy of an anti-inflammatory treatment in decreasing anxiety-like behavior and reactive gliosis when introduced at 1 month after injury. Delayed treatment substantially reduced established LFPI-induced freezing behavior and reactive gliosis in brain regions associated with anxiety and continued neuroprotective effects were evidenced 6 months post-treatment. These results support the conclusion that neuroinflammation may be involved in the development and maintenance of anxiety-like behaviors after TBI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/neu.2013.3090DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3934516PMC
March 2014

Caudal granular insular cortex is sufficient and necessary for the long-term maintenance of allodynic behavior in the rat attributable to mononeuropathy.

J Neurosci 2011 Apr;31(17):6317-28

Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0345, USA.

Mechanical allodynia, the perception of innocuous tactile stimulation as painful, is a severe symptom of chronic pain often produced by damage to peripheral nerves. Allodynia affects millions of people and remains highly resistant to classic analgesics and therapies. Neural mechanisms for the development and maintenance of allodynia have been investigated in the spinal cord, brainstem, thalamus, and forebrain, but manipulations of these regions rarely produce lasting effects. We found that long-term alleviation of allodynic manifestations is produced by discreetly lesioning a newly discovered somatosensory representation in caudal granular insular cortex (CGIC) in the rat, either before or after a chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve. However, CGIC lesions alone have no effect on normal mechanical stimulus thresholds. In addition, using electrophysiological techniques, we reveal a corticospinal loop that could be the anatomical source of the influence of CGIC on allodynia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0076-11.2011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3089761PMC
April 2011