Publications by authors named "Sergiy Smetana"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The impact of Corona pandemic on consumer's food consumption: Vulnerability of households with children and income losses and change in sustainable consumption behavior.

J Verbrauch Lebensm 2021 Aug 16:1-10. Epub 2021 Aug 16.

DIL e.V.-German Institute of Food Technologies, Prof.-von-Klitzing-Straße 7, 49610 Quakenbrück, Germany.

The ongoing corona crisis affected many people worldwide by restrictions in their everyday lives. The question arises to what extent the pandemic has accelerated diet trends or general differences in food consumption between different population groups. For this purpose, an online-survey was carried out in order to determine the effects of the corona lockdown on food consumption, shopping behaviour and eating habits in Germany. The aspects of sustainability and health were given special consideration in this study, reflecting people choices of healthier and more environmentally conscious foods. This study demonstrates that the corona pandemic has a significant impact on consumers' eating habits. More food was eaten, and more convenience products such as ready-made meals and canned food with a longer shelf life were purchased. The consumption of alcohol and sweets has also increased. In return, there was a reduced consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables. The findings reveal that families who are financially affected by the pandemic represent a vulnerable group. With the ongoing pandemic, possible lockdowns, corona-related closings of schools and kindergartens, severe health consequences are expected long term, especially for this population group.

Supplementary Information: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s00003-021-01341-1.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00003-021-01341-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8365131PMC
August 2021

Comparative life cycle assessment of a mesh ultra-thin layer photobioreactor and a tubular glass photobioreactor for the production of bioactive algae extracts.

Bioresour Technol 2021 Nov 25;340:125657. Epub 2021 Jul 25.

Institute for Food and Environmental Research ILU e.V., Papendorfer Weg 3, 14806 Bad Belzig, Germany; Technische Universität Berlin, Institute of Food Technology and Food Chemistry, Department of Food Chemistry and Analysis, TIB 4/3-1, Gustav-Meyer-Allee 25, 13355 Berlin, Germany.

This study aimed at the comparison of two different photobioreactors with focus on technology and sustainability. The mesh ultra-thin layer photobioreactor (MUTL-PBR) exhibited around 3-fold biomass based space-time-yield and an around 10-fold specific antioxidant capacity than the traditional reference photobioreactor. Life cycle assessment (LCA) was done under autotrophic conditions in both pilot scale reactors with focus on biomass production and on antioxidant capacity of the biomass, respectively. Biomass production within the reference reactor showed a lower environmental impact in most categories. A significantly higher energy demand for mixing and cooling of the cell suspension within the MUTL-PBR is the major reason for its environmental burden. This relates to high impacts in the categories "non-renewable energy" and "global warming potential" per kg biomass. Comparing algal antioxidant capacity, environmental impact of the MUTL cultivation was 5-10 times lower. This clearly illustrates the potential of MUTL-PBR for sustainable production of bioactive substances.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2021.125657DOI Listing
November 2021

Cultivation of the heterotrophic microalga Galdieria sulphuraria on food waste: A Life Cycle Assessment.

Bioresour Technol 2021 Nov 22;340:125637. Epub 2021 Jul 22.

Sustainable Chemistry (Resource Efficiency), Institute of Sustainable Chemistry, Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Universitätsallee 1, Lüneburg C13.203, 21335, Germany; Institute for Food and Environmental Research e. V., Papendorfer Weg 3, Bad Belzig 14806, Germany. Electronic address:

The aim of this study was to perform a Life Cycle Assessment of a production process of 1 kg dry algal biomass powder (Galdieria sulphuraria) with 27 % (w/w) protein content for human consumption for optimizing the production regarding global warming potential and resource efficiency in combination with food waste utilization. It was investigated, underpinned by a comparison of the use of conventional glucose, whether and to what extent the environmental impact/global warming potential can be reduced by changing to food waste hydrolysate and how this can lead to a more sustainable use of resources and a sustainable development. Overall, the results showed that hydrolysis, along with freeze-drying, caused most of the overall impact. The carbon footprint associated with the use of hydrolyzed food waste was 11% higher than using conventional glucose and supplementary nutrients mainly driven by the high demand of energy for hydrolysis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2021.125637DOI Listing
November 2021

Life cycle assessment of hetero- and phototrophic as well as combined cultivations of Galdieria sulphuraria.

Bioresour Technol 2021 Sep 5;335:125227. Epub 2021 May 5.

Sustainable Chemistry (Resource Efficiency), Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Universitätsallee 1, C13.203, 21335 Lüneburg, Germany; Institute for Food and Environmental Research e. V., Papendorfer Weg 3, 14806 Bad Belzig, Germany. Electronic address:

Microalgae cultivation for food purposes could have high environmental impacts. The study performed life cycle assessment (LCA) of hypothetical model combining phototrophic and heterotrophic cultivations, exchanging produced gases (carbon dioxide from heterotrophic and oxygen from autotrophic) as a potential strategy to reduce the environmental impact of microalgae cultivation. The LCA indicated that the production of Galdieria sulphuraria in a combined cultivation system has environmental benefits compared with the separate phototrophic cultivation and an almost twice lower carbon footprint than phototrophic cultivation. The benefits are based on the lower volume of culture broth and consequently reduced energy demand as well as less demanding wastewater treatment of the heterotrophic cultivation. Such combination of cultivation activities could be recommended to the producers dealing with phototrophic cultivation as a sustainable strategy for the environmental impact reduction.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2021.125227DOI Listing
September 2021

Discrete Choice Analysis of Consumer Preferences for Meathybrids-Findings from Germany and Belgium.

Foods 2020 Dec 31;10(1). Epub 2020 Dec 31.

DIL e.V.-German Institute of Food Technology, Prof.-von-Klitzing-Straße 7, 49610 D-Quakenbrück, Germany.

High levels of meat consumption are increasingly being criticised for ethical, environmental and social reasons. Plant-based meat substitutes have been identified as healthy sources of protein that, in comparison to meat, offer a number of social, environmental and health benefits and may play a role in reducing meat consumption. However, there has been a lack of research on the role they can play in the policy agenda and how specific meat substitute attributes can influence consumers to partially replace meat in their diets. This paper is focused on consumers' preferences for so-called meathybrid or plant-meathybrid products. In meathybrids, only a fraction of the meat product (e.g., 20% to 50%) is replaced with plant-based proteins. Research demonstrates that in many countries, consumers are highly attached to meat and consider it as an essential and integral element of their daily diet. For these consumers that are not interested in vegan or vegetarian alternatives as meat substitutes, meathybrids could be a low-threshold option for a more sustainable food consumption behaviour. In this paper, the results of an online survey with 500 German and 501 Belgian consumers are presented. The results show that more than fifty percent of consumers substitute meat at least occasionally. Thus, about half of the respondents reveal an eligible consumption behaviour with respect to sustainability and healthiness, at least sometimes. The applied discrete choice experiment demonstrated that the analysed meat products are the most preferred by consumers. Nonetheless, the tested meathybrid variants with different shares of plant-based proteins took the second position followed by the vegetarian-based alternatives. Therefore, meathybrids could facilitate the diet transition of meat-eaters in the direction toward a more healthy and sustainable consumption. The analysed consumer segment is more open-minded to the meathybrid concept in comparison to the vegetarian substitutes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods10010071DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7823736PMC
December 2020

Can we associate environmental footprints with production and consumption using Monte Carlo simulation? Case study with pork meat.

J Sci Food Agric 2021 Feb 17;101(3):960-969. Epub 2020 Sep 17.

Department of Animal Origin Products Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Republic of Serbia.

Background: Growing population demands more animal protein products. Pork remains one of the traditional and relatively sustainable types of meats for human consumption. In this paper, life-cycle assessment was performed using data from 12 pig farms. In parallel, a survey on the consumption of pork meat products was conducted analyzing responses from 806 pork meat consumers. The study aims to provide a quantitative calculation of six environmental footprints associated with the consumption of pork meat products in Serbia by analyzing data from pig farms and a pork meat consumption survey.

Results: Results revealed that pork meat production is responsible for the emission of 3.50 kg CO2 kg live weight, 16.1 MJ kg , 0.151 mg R11 kg , 31.257 g SO kg , 55.030 g PO kg and 3.641 kg 1.4 dB kg . Further calculations reveal that weekly emissions of various environmental potentials associated with an average consumer of pork meat products in Serbia are estimated at values of 4.032 kg CO week , 18.504 MJ week , 0.17435 mg R11 week , 35.972 g SO week and 63.466 g PO week .

Conclusions: Results show that, on the one hand, pork products are responsible for environmental production impacts that mainly occur on farms while, on the other hand, consumption is characterized with high meat inclusion rates. As a leverage strategy it is recommended for producers to concentrate on lowering the production impacts rather than trying to reach consumers for sustainability conciseness. © 2020 Society of Chemical Industry.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.10704DOI Listing
February 2021

High-pressure processing of usually discarded dry aged beef trimmings for subsequent processing.

Meat Sci 2020 Dec 15;170:108241. Epub 2020 Jul 15.

DIL - Deutsches Institut für Lebensmitteltechnik/German Institute of Food Technologies e. V., Prof.-v.-Klitzing-Str. 7, 49610 Quakenbrück, Germany. Electronic address:

In this study, we investigated if the usually discarded trimmings from dry aged beef can be incorporated into raw fermented sausages as a substitute for fresh beef without altering any major characteristics. Dry aged trimmings were subjected to high-pressure processing (600 MPa, 3 min hold) to reduce the bacterial load, achieving a 3-log reduction. HPP-treated dry aged beef trimmings were then incorporated into raw fermented sausages (60% pork and 40% beef). Beef was substituted with trimmings in different concentrations (7.5, 12.5, 25, 50, 100%). Due to the substitution, the water content of the sausages was reduced depending on the amount of beef substituted. Consequently, the sausages with substituted beef, for example, 50 and 100%, achieved the same water content after 5.4 and 3.7 days, respectively, than control sausage at day 9. However, the substitution (100%) affected the fat content, which contributes to significant differences (p < .05) in firmness during ripening.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.meatsci.2020.108241DOI Listing
December 2020

Bio-refinery of Chlorella sorokiniana with pulsed electric field pre-treatment.

Bioresour Technol 2020 Apr 7;301:122743. Epub 2020 Jan 7.

Elea Vertriebs- und Vermarktungsgesellschaft mbH, Prof. von Klitzing Str. 9, 49610 Quakenbrück, Germany.

The aim of this work was to investigate the potential of PEF technology for green extraction of microalgal pigments and lipids from fresh Chlorella sorokiniana suspensions. Efficiencies of PEF treatment and different solvent systems application to C.sorokiniana were compared to efficiencies of untreated biomass extraction. Differences in chlorophyll extraction of untreated and PEF treated C.sorokiniana were only seen at short extraction times. Beneficial PEF-effect was minimised for long-time extractions of larger algae quantities where yields aligned. Extraction attempts on C. sorokiniana lipids did not show increased extractability after PEF treatment, which underlined the statement of PEF representing a rather ineffective disruption method for microalgae holding rigid cell walls.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2020.122743DOI Listing
April 2020

Estimation of the economy of heterotrophic microalgae- and insect-based food waste utilization processes.

Waste Manag 2020 Feb 1;102:198-203. Epub 2019 Nov 1.

German Institute of Food Technologies - DIL e.V., Quakenbrueck, Germany.

An estimation of the economy of Hermetia illucens and Chlorella pyrenoidosa cultivations as food waste treatment with benefits was carried out. For both organisms, a process scale was assumed to treat 56.3 t of wet food waste per day, which is equivalent to the amount of food waste appearing in a catchment area of 141,000 inhabitants. Using hypothetical insect and heterotrophic microalgae cultivation processes, a daily production of 3.64 t and 7.14 t dried biomass, respectively, can be achieved. For the cultivation of H. illucens, equipment and daily operational costs were estimated at 79,358.15 € and 5,281.56 €, respectively. Equipment and operational costs for the C. pyrenoidosa cultivation was 50 and 6 times higher, respectively. The higher costs reflect the more complex and advanced process compared to H. illucens cultivation. The internal return rate for a plant lifetime of 20 times revealed an economic benefit when C. pyrenoidosa biomass is produced. Nevertheless, both processes were found economically feasible when dried biomass is directly commercialized as food without any further downstream processing. However, extraction and purification of special chemicals, such as unsaturated fatty acids and pigments, can significantly increase the revenue.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wasman.2019.10.031DOI Listing
February 2020

Nutritional Sustainability Inside-Marketing Sustainability as an Inherent Ingredient.

Front Nutr 2019 6;6:84. Epub 2019 Jun 6.

German Institute of Food Technologies (DIL e.V.), Quakenbrück, Germany.

Current discussions about the concept of nutritional sustainability show a high complexity of this topic leading to many different definitions. Regarding communication issues of nutritional sustainability between actors of food chains this complexity should be reduced. One opportunity to tackle these challenges of reducing complexity might be the concept of ingredient branding. Therefore, the aim of this mini-review is the identification of conditions for ingredient branding application as a communication strategy for nutritional sustainability which might overcome challenges in communicating the complexity between the different stakeholders of supply chains. In doing so, the specific case of agrifood chains is discussed based on the selected characteristics of globalization, increasing consumer demands, foods incorporating credence attributes and price. Along the agrifood chain, a sourcing strategy reflecting nutritional and sustainable aspects might lead to an ingredient branding strategy implying a brand policy for a special ingredient within the final product which is an important component but cannot be clearly recognized by the user. A "nutritional sustainability inside" strategy should reflect the multifaceted information along the agrifood chain and should be based on standardized criteria for nutritional sustainability.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnut.2019.00084DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6562278PMC
June 2019

A Path From Sustainable Nutrition to Nutritional Sustainability of Complex Food Systems.

Front Nutr 2019 12;6:39. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

German Institute of Food Technologies (DIL e.V.), Quakenbrück, Germany.

Integration of nutritional and sustainable aspects is a complex task tackled by a few scientific concepts. They include multiple dimensions and functions of food systems trying to provide solutions for harmonic co-evolution of humanity and planet Earth. "Nutritional Sustainability" is differentiated from other concepts which combine nutrition and sustainability as it not only sets environmental sustaining capacity as a baseline level for balanced nutrition, but also aims for the search of food system driving nodes. It does not aim for the support of solutions of producing enough or more food for increasing population (sustainable nutrition), neither does it contradict other similar concepts [sustainable nutrition security, nutritional life cycle assessment (LCA)]. However, it calls for more definite estimation of the carrying capacity of the environment on personal, local, and national levels for the development of more efficient solutions of nutrition balanced in the limits of environmental carrying capacity. The review is providing a few examples of advances in nutritional science (personalized nutrition, nutrigenetics), food technology (personalized food processing, food ecodesign), and food complex systems (artificial intelligence and gut microbiome), which have a great potential to progress sustainable food systems with Nutritional Sustainability set as a guiding concept.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnut.2019.00039DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6473629PMC
April 2019

Autotrophic and heterotrophic microalgae and cyanobacteria cultivation for food and feed: life cycle assessment.

Bioresour Technol 2017 Dec 20;245(Pt A):162-170. Epub 2017 Aug 20.

German Institute of Food Technologies - DIL e.V., Prof.-von-Klitzing-Str. 7, 49610 Quakenbrueck, Germany.

The lack of protein sources in Europe could be reduced with onsite production of microalgae with autotrophic and heterotrophic systems, owing the confirmation of economic and environmental benefits. This study aimed at the life cycle assessment (LCA) of microalgae and cyanobacteria cultivation (Chlorella vulgaris and Arthrospira platensis) in autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions on a pilot industrial scale (in model conditions of Berlin, Germany) with further biomass processing for food and feed products. The comparison of analysis results with traditional benchmarks (protein concentrates) indicated higher environmental impact of microalgae protein powders. However high-moisture extrusion of heterotrophic cultivated C. vulgaris resulted in more environmentally sustainable product than pork and beef. Further optimization of production with Chlorella pyrenoidosa on hydrolyzed food waste could reduce environmental impact in 4.5 times and create one of the most sustainable sources of proteins.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2017.08.113DOI Listing
December 2017
-->