Publications by authors named "Sergej Zakharov"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Leukocyte telomere length is not affected by long-term occupational exposure to nano metal oxides.

Ind Health 2019 Nov 28;57(6):741-744. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals CAS, Czech Republic.

The aim of this study was to ascertain whether long-term occupational exposure to nanoparticles would affect relative leukocyte telomere length (LrTL). We analysed occupational exposure to size-resolved aerosol particles, with special emphasis on nanoparticles at two workshops: i/ the production of nanocomposites containing metal oxides; ii/ laboratory to test experimental exposure of nano-CuO to rodents. Thirty five exposed researchers (age 39.5 ± 12.6 yr; exposure duration 6.0 ± 3.7 yr) and 43 controls (40.4 ± 10.5 yr) were examined. LrTL did not significantly (p=0.14) differ between the exposed researchers (0.92 ± 0.13) and controls (0.86 ± 0.15). In addition, no significant correlation (r=-0.22, p=0.22) was detected between the duration of occupational exposure and LrTL. The results remained non-significant after multiple adjustments for age, sex and smoking status. Our pilot results suggest that relative leukocyte telomere length is not affected by occupational exposure to nanoparticles.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2486/indhealth.2018-0146DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6885603PMC
November 2019

Gait and Balance Impairment after Acute Methanol Poisoning.

Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol 2018 Jan 6;122(1):176-182. Epub 2017 Sep 6.

Department of Neurology, Charles University, First Faculty of Medicine and General University Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic.

Neurological sequelae including gait impairment were reported in survivors after methanol intoxication; however, no systematic study has been published so far. We aimed to analyse gait and balance impairment in a group of Czech methanol poisoning survivors. We examined 43 patients (age 46 ± 13 years) 2-8 months after methanol poisoning and 43 healthy controls. Investigations contained a shortened version of Falls Efficacy Scale (FES), clinical tests of gait and balance including Timed Up and Go test (TUG) and gait analysis using GaitRite system, neurological and neuropsychological examination, brain imaging, EMG and tests of alcohol consumption. Nineteen patients admitted balance and gait impairment according to FES. Mild to moderate parkinsonian signs showed seven patients. Patients were slower (8.8 versus 5.7 s, p < 0.001) and performed more steps (11.1 versus 7.9, p < 0.001) in TUG compared with the controls. Gait analysis revealed shorter step length (76.5 versus 88.7 cm, p < 0.001), increased double support phase (18.8 versus 15.5%, p < 0.001) and wider base of support (11.3 versus 9.6 cm, p = 0.006) in patients. Eleven patients had deficit of executive function and performed higher cadence compared to the patients with normal execution (122.7 versus 115.0 step/min., p = 0.025). Lower limb polyneuropathy was verified in nine patients, without relation with gait or balance parameters. Neuroimaging revealed lesions mainly in the basal ganglia. Methanol poisoning survivors presented slower wide-based gait with shortened steps corresponding with frontal gait disorder. Higher stepping cadence associated with executive deficit supported the evidence of frontal lobe dysfunction related to impairment of basal ganglia and connections in frontal cortico-basal ganglia loops.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bcpt.12853DOI Listing
January 2018