Publications by authors named "Sergei P Smirnov"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Conjugation of LG domains of agrins and perlecan to polymerizing laminin-2 promotes acetylcholine receptor clustering.

J Biol Chem 2005 Dec 11;280(50):41449-57. Epub 2005 Oct 11.

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854, USA.

Neuromuscular junction (NMJ) assembly is characterized by the clustering and neuronal alignment of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). In this study we have addressed post-synaptic contributions to assembly that may arise from the NMJ basement membrane with cultured myotubes. We show that the cell surface-binding LG domains of non-neural (muscle) agrin and perlecan promote AChR clustering in the presence of laminin-2. This type of AChR clustering occurs with a several hour lag, requires muscle-specific kinase (MuSK), and is accompanied by tyrosine phosphorylation of MuSK and betaAChR. It also requires conjugation of the agrin or perlecan to laminin together with laminin polymerization. Furthermore, AChR clustering can be mimicked with antibody binding to non-neural agrin, supporting a mechanism of ligand aggregation. Neural agrin, in addition to its unique ability to cluster AChRs through its B/z sequence insert, also exhibits laminin-dependent AChR clustering, the latter enhancing and stabilizing its activity. Finally, we show that type IV collagen, which lacks clustering activity on its own, stabilizes laminin-dependent AChR clusters. These findings provide evidence for cooperative and partially redundant MuSK-dependent functions of basement membrane in AChR assembly that can enhance neural agrin activity yet operate in its absence. Such interactions may contribute to the assembly of aneural AChR clusters that precede neural agrin release as well as affect later NMJ development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M508939200DOI Listing
December 2005

Contributions of the LG modules and furin processing to laminin-2 functions.

J Biol Chem 2002 May 8;277(21):18928-37. Epub 2002 Mar 8.

Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854, USA.

The alpha2-laminin subunit contributes to basement membrane functions in muscle, nerve, and other tissues, and mutations in its gene are causes of congenital muscular dystrophy. The alpha2 G-domain modules, mutated in several of these disorders, are thought to mediate different cellular interactions. To analyze these contributions, we expressed recombinant laminin-2 (alpha(2)beta(1)gamma(1)) with LG4-5, LG1-3, and LG1-5 modular deletions. Wild-type and LG4-5 deleted-laminins were isolated from medium intact and cleaved within LG3 by a furin-like convertase. Myoblasts adhered predominantly through LG1-3 while alpha-dystroglycan bound to both LG1-3 and LG4-5. Recombinant laminin stimulated acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering; however, clustering was induced only by the proteolytic processed form, even in the absence of LG4-5. Furthermore, clustering required alpha(6)beta(1) integrin and alpha-dystroglycan binding activities available on LG1-3, acting in concert with laminin polymerization. The ability of the modified laminins to mediate basement membrane assembly was also evaluated in embryoid bodies where it was found that both LG1-3 and LG4-5, but not processing, were required. In conclusion, there is a division of labor among LG-modules in which (i) LG4-5 is required for basement membrane assembly but not for AChR clustering, and (ii) laminin-induced AChR clustering requires furin cleavage of LG3 as well as alpha-dystroglycan and alpha(6)beta(1) integrin binding.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M201880200DOI Listing
May 2002