Publications by authors named "Sergei A Egorov"

30 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

When does Wenzel's extension of Young's equation for the contact angle of droplets apply? A density functional study.

J Chem Phys 2020 May;152(19):194707

Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz, 55099 Mainz, Germany.

The contact angle of a liquid droplet on a surface under partial wetting conditions differs for a nanoscopically rough or periodically corrugated surface from its value for a perfectly flat surface. Wenzel's relation attributes this difference simply to the geometric magnification of the surface area (by a factor r), but the validity of this idea is controversial. We elucidate this problem by model calculations for a sinusoidal corrugation of the form z(y) = Δ cos(2πy/λ), for a potential of short range σ acting from the wall on the fluid particles. When the vapor phase is an ideal gas, the change in the wall-vapor surface tension can be computed exactly, and corrections to Wenzel's equation are typically of the order σΔ/λ. For fixed r and fixed σ, the approach to Wenzel's result with increasing λ may be nonmonotonic and this limit often is only reached for λ/σ > 30. For a non-additive binary mixture, density functional theory is used to work out the density profiles of both coexisting phases for planar and corrugated walls as well as the corresponding surface tensions. Again, deviations from Wenzel's results of similar magnitude as in the above ideal gas case are predicted. Finally, a crudely simplified description based on the interface Hamiltonian concept is used to interpret the corresponding simulation results along similar lines. Wenzel's approach is found to generally hold when λ/σ ≫ 1 and Δ/λ < 1 and under conditions avoiding proximity of wetting or filling transitions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/5.0005537DOI Listing
May 2020

Colossal Spin Splitting in the Monolayer of the Collinear Antiferromagnet MnF.

J Phys Chem Lett 2021 Mar 3;12(9):2363-2369. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

Quantum Chemistry Department, Institute of Chemistry, Saint Petersburg State University, 7-9 Universitetskaya Naberezhnaya, Saint Petersburg 199034, Russia.

In this Letter we report on the colossal spin splitting (on the order of several electronvolts) in the collinear antiferromagnetic (AFM) MnF (110) monolayer, which we obtained from first-principles calculations and explain in terms of group-theoretical analysis. This Pekar-Rashba AFM-induced spin splitting with a magnetic mechanism does not require the presence of spin-orbit coupling such as with a traditional Rashba-Dresselhaus electric mechanism. Furthermore, it was observed for all wave vectors, including high-symmetry points of the two-dimensional (2D) Brillouin zone. This is in contrast to recently reported AFM-induced spin splitting in the bulk structure of MnF, which was both smaller by at least an order of magnitude and required to vanish by symmetry at several high-symmetry points and directions of the three-dimensional Brillouin zone. The crucial part of our group-theoretical analysis is the determination of the magnetic layer group for the monolayer structure for which we propose a simple and generic procedure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jpclett.1c00282DOI Listing
March 2021

Phase Behavior of Lyotropic Liquid-Crystalline Polymers under Varying Solvent Conditions: Effect of External Fields on the Phase Diagram.

Authors:
Sergei A Egorov

J Phys Chem B 2021 Feb 28;125(5):1513-1528. Epub 2021 Jan 28.

Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22901, United States.

In this work, we report a Density Functional Theory based study of phase behavior of lyotropic liquid-crystalline polymers under both good and varying solvent conditions in the presence of external electric or magnetic field. Our microscopic model for the good solvent case is based on the tangent hard-sphere chain with bond-bending potential to account for the chain stiffness; the variable solvent quality is modeled by adding attractive monomer-monomer interactions. The phase diagrams are constructed in three intensive variables (temperature, pressure, and field strength), and are characterized by the presence of critical and triple lines, which originate from the critical and triple points of the corresponding zero-field case. The merging of critical and triple lines results in the appearance of the "double critical" and "critical triple" points, already known from the earlier studies of the phase behavior of spin fluids in magnetic fields. The important difference of the present model from the spin fluids is due to the finite stiffness of the polymer chains (characterized by their persistence length), which adds an additional parameter controlling the morphology of the phase diagrams.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jpcb.0c10905DOI Listing
February 2021

Phase Separation and Nematic Order in Lyotropic Solutions: Two Types of Polymers with Different Stiffnesses in a Common Solvent.

J Phys Chem B 2021 01 13;125(3):956-969. Epub 2021 Jan 13.

Institute of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz, Germany.

The interplay of the isotropic-nematic transition and phase separation in lyotropic solutions of two types of semiflexible macromolecules with pronounced difference in chain stiffness is studied by Density Functional Theory and Molecular Dynamics simulations. While the width of the isotropic-nematic two-phase coexistence region is narrow for solutions with a single type of semiflexible chain, the two-phase coexistence region widens for solutions containing two types of chains with rather disparate stiffness. In the nematic phase, both types of chains contribute to the nematic order, with intermediate values of the order parameter compared to the corresponding single component solutions. As the difference in bending stiffness is increased, the two chain types separate into two coexisting nematic phases. The phase behavior is rationalized by considering the chemical potentials of the two components and the Gibbs excess free energy. The geometric properties of the chain conformations under the various conditions are also discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jpcb.0c10411DOI Listing
January 2021

Nanoparticle diffusion in polymer melts: Molecular dynamics simulations and mode-coupling theory.

J Chem Phys 2020 Jun;152(23):234902

Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia, Bulgaria.

Nanoparticle diffusion in polymer melts is studied by the combination of Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and Mode-Coupling Theory (MCT). In accord with earlier experimental, simulation, and theoretical studies, we find that the Stokes-Einstein (SE) hydrodynamic relation D ∼ 1/R holds when the nanoparticle radius R is greater than the polymer gyration radius R, while in the opposite regime, the measured nanoparticle diffusion coefficient D exceeds the SE value by as much as an order of magnitude. The MCT values of D are found to be consistently higher than the MD simulation values. The observed discrepancy is attributed to the approximations involved in constructing the microscopic friction as well as to the approximate forms for dynamic structure factors used in MCT. In a thorough test of underlying MCT assumptions and approximations, various structural and dynamical quantities required as input for MCT are obtained directly from MD simulations. We present the improved MCT approach, which involves splitting of the microscopic time-dependent friction into two terms: binary (originating from short-time dynamics) and collective (due to long-time dynamics). Using MD data as input in MCT, we demonstrate that the total friction is largely dominated by its binary short-time term, which, if neglected, leads to severe overestimation of D. As a result, the revised version of MCT, in agreement with the present MD data, predicts 1/R scaling of the probe diffusion coefficient in a non-hydrodynamic regime when R < R. If the total friction is dominated by the collective long-time component, one would observe 1/R scaling of D in accordance with previous studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/5.0005301DOI Listing
June 2020

Phase behavior of flexible and semiflexible polymers in solvents of varying quality.

J Chem Phys 2019 Jul;151(3):034902

Institute of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz, Germany.

The interplay of nematic order and phase separation in solutions of semiflexible polymers in solvents of variable quality is investigated by density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We studied coarse-grained models, with a bond-angle potential to control chain stiffness, for chain lengths comparable to the persistence length of the chains. We varied both the density of the monomeric units and the effective temperature that controls the quality of the implicit solvent. For very stiff chains, only a single transition from an isotropic fluid to a nematic is found, with a phase diagram of "swan-neck" topology. For less stiff chains, however, also unmixing between isotropic fluids of different concentration, ending in a critical point, occurs for temperatures above a triple point. The associated critical behavior is examined in the MD simulations and found compatible with Ising universality. Apart from this critical behavior, DFT calculations agree qualitatively with the MD simulations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5110393DOI Listing
July 2019

Predicting the effect of chain-length mismatch on phase separation in noble metal nanoparticle monolayers with chemically mismatched ligands.

Soft Matter 2019 Jun;15(22):4498-4507

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Virginia, Thornton Hall, P.O. Box 400259, Charlottesville, VA 22904, USA.

Nanoparticles (NPs) protected with a ligand monolayer hold promise for a wide variety of applications, from photonics and catalysis to drug delivery and biosensing. Monolayers that include a mixture of ligand types can have multiple chemical functionalities and may also self-assemble into advantageous patterns. Previous work has shown that both chemical and length mismatches among these surface ligands influence phase separation. In this work, we examine the interplay between these driving forces, first by using our previously-developed configurationally-biased Monte Carlo (CBMC) algorithm to predict, then by using our matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) technique to experimentally probe, the surface morphologies of a series of two-ligand mixtures on the surfaces of ultrasmall silver NPs. Specifically, we examine three such mixtures, each of which has the same chemical mismatch (consisting of a hydrophobic alkanethiol and a hydrophilic mercapto-alcohol), but varying degrees of chain-length mismatch. This delicate balance between chemical and length mismatches provides a challenging test for our CBMC prediction algorithm. Even so, the simulations are able to quantitatively predict the MALDI-MS results for all three ligand mixtures, while also providing atomic-scale details from the equilibrated ligand structures, such as patch sizes and co-crystallization patterns. The resulting monolayer morphologies range from randomly-mixed to Janus-like, demonstrating that chain-length modifications are an effective way to tune monolayer morphology without needing to alter chemical functionalities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9sm00264bDOI Listing
June 2019

Disentangling the Role of Chain Conformation on the Mechanics of Polymer Tethered Particle Materials.

Nano Lett 2019 04 29;19(4):2715-2722. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research , Ackermannweg 10 , 55128 , Mainz , Germany.

The linear elastic properties of isotropic materials of polymer tethered nanoparticles (NPs) are evaluated using noncontact Brillouin light spectroscopy. While the mechanical properties of dense brush materials follow predicted trends with NP composition, a surprising increase in elastic moduli is observed in the case of sparsely grafted particle systems at approximately equal NP filling ratio. Complementary molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the stiffening is caused by the coil-like conformations of the grafted chains, which lead to stronger polymer-polymer interactions compared to densely grafted NPs with short chains. Our results point to novel opportunities to enhance the physical properties of composite materials by the strategic design of the "molecular architecture" of constituents to benefit from synergistic effects relating to the organization of the polymer component.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.nanolett.9b00817DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6463242PMC
April 2019

Influence of polymer flexibility on nanoparticle dynamics in semidilute solutions.

Soft Matter 2019 Feb;15(6):1260-1268

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204, USA.

The hierarchical structure and dynamics of polymer solutions control the transport of nanoparticles (NPs) through them. Here, we perform multi-particle collision dynamics simulations of solutions of semiflexible polymer chains with tunable persistence length lp to investigate the effect of chain stiffness on NP transport. The NPs exhibit two distinct dynamical regimes - subdiffusion on short time scales and diffusion on long time scales. The long-time NP diffusivities are compared with predictions from the Stokes-Einstein relation (SER), mode-coupling theory (MCT), and a recent polymer coupling theory (PCT). Increasing deviations from the SER as the polymer chains become more rigid (i.e. as lp increases) indicate that the NP motions become decoupled from the bulk viscosity of the polymer solution. Likewise, polymer stiffness leads to deviations from PCT, which was developed for fully flexible chains. Independent of lp, however, the long-time diffusion behavior is well-described by MCT, particularly at high polymer concentration. We also observed that the short-time subdiffusive dynamics are strongly dependent on polymer flexibility. As lp is increased, the NP dynamics become more subdiffusive and decouple from the dynamics of the polymer chain center-of-mass. We posit that these effects are due to differences in the segmental mobility of the semiflexible chains.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8sm01834kDOI Listing
February 2019

Nematic order in solutions of semiflexible polymers: Hairpins, elastic constants, and the nematic-smectic transition.

J Chem Phys 2018 Nov;149(17):174909

Institute of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz, Germany.

Coarse-grained models of lyotropic solutions of semiflexible polymers are studied by both molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory calculations, using an implicit solvent bead-spring model with a bond-angle potential. We systematically vary the monomer density, persistence length, and contour length over a wide range and explore the full range from the isotropic-nematic transition to the nematic-smectic transition. In the nematic regime, we span the entire regime from rigid-rod like polymers to thin wormlike chains, confined in effective straight tubes caused by the collective nematic effective ordering field. We show that the distribution of bond angles relative to the director is well described by a Gaussian, irrespective of whether the chains are rod-like or rather flexible. However, the related concept of "deflection length" is shown to make sense only in the latter case for rather dilute solutions since otherwise the deflection length is of the order of about two bond lengths only. When the solution is semi-dilute, a substantial renormalization of the persistence length occurs, while this effect is absent in the isotropic phase even at rather high monomer densities. The effective radii of the "tubes" confining the chains in the related description of orientational ordering are significantly larger than the distances between neighboring chains, providing evidence for a pronounced collective character of orientational fluctuations. Hairpins can be identified close to the isotropic-nematic transition, and their probability of occurrence agrees qualitatively with the Vroege-Odijk theory. The corresponding theoretical predictions for the elastic constants, however, are not in good agreement with the simulations. We attribute the shortcomings of the theories to their neglect of the coupling between local density and orientational fluctuations. Finally, we detected for this model a transition to a smectic phase for reduced monomer densities near 0.7.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5049630DOI Listing
November 2018

Computational and Experimental Investigation of Janus-like Monolayers on Ultrasmall Noble Metal Nanoparticles.

ACS Nano 2018 Nov 26;12(11):11031-11040. Epub 2018 Oct 26.

Department of Chemistry , University of Virginia , McCormick Road , PO Box 400319, Charlottesville , Virginia 22904 , United States.

Detection of monolayer morphology on nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm has proven difficult with traditional visualization techniques. Here matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is used in conjunction with atomistic simulations to detect the formation of Janus-like monolayers on noble metal nanoparticles. Silver metal nanoparticles were synthesized with a monolayer consisting of dodecanethiol (DDT) and mercaptoethanol (ME) at varying ratios. The nanoparticles were then analyzed using MALDI-MS, which gives information on the local ordering of ligands on the surface. The MALDI-MS analysis showed large deviations from random ordering, suggesting phase separation of the DDT/ME monolayers. Atomistic Monte Carlo (MC) calculations were then used to simulate the nanoscale morphology of the DDT/ME monolayers. In order to quantitatively compare the computational and experimental results, we developed a method for determining an expected MALDI-MS spectrum from the atomistic simulation. Experiments and simulations show quantitative agreement, and both indicate that the DDT/ME ligands undergo phase separation, resulting in Janus-like nanoparticle monolayers with large, patchy domains.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsnano.8b05188DOI Listing
November 2018

Do the contact angle and line tension of surface-attached droplets depend on the radius of curvature?

J Phys Condens Matter 2018 Jun 9;30(25):255001. Epub 2018 May 9.

Theoretical Sciences Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bangalore, 56004, India.

Results from Monte Carlo simulations of wall-attached droplets in the three-dimensional Ising lattice gas model and in a symmetric binary Lennard-Jones fluid, confined by antisymmetric walls, are analyzed, with the aim to estimate the dependence of the contact angle [Formula: see text] on the droplet radius [Formula: see text] of curvature. Sphere-cap shape of the wall-attached droplets is assumed throughout. An approach, based purely on 'thermodynamic' observables, e.g. chemical potential, excess density due to the droplet, etc, is used, to avoid ambiguities in the decision which particles belong (or do not belong, respectively) to the droplet. It is found that the results are compatible with a variation [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] being the contact angle in the thermodynamic limit ([Formula: see text]). The possibility to use such results to estimate the excess free energy related to the contact line of the droplet, namely the line tension, at the wall, is discussed. Various problems that hamper this approach and were not fully recognized in previous attempts to extract the line tension are identified. It is also found that the dependence of wall tensions on the difference of chemical potential of the droplet from that at the bulk coexistence provides effectively a change of the contact angle of similar magnitude. The simulation approach yields precise estimates for the excess density due to wall-attached droplets and the corresponding free energy excess, relative to a system without a droplet at the same chemical potential. It is shown that this information suffices to estimate nucleation barriers, not affected by ambiguities on droplet shape, contact angle and line tension.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1361-648X/aac363DOI Listing
June 2018

Stiffness-guided motion of a droplet on a solid substrate.

J Chem Phys 2017 Jun;146(24):244705

Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physical Chemistry, 1113 Sofia, Bulgaria.

A range of technologies require the directed motion of nanoscale droplets on solid substrates. A way of realizing this effect is durotaxis, whereby a stiffness gradient of a substrate can induce directional motion without requiring an energy source. Here, we report on the results of extensive molecular dynamics investigations of droplets on a surface with varying stiffness. We find that durotaxis is enhanced by increasing the stiffness gradient and, also, by increased wettability of the substrate, in particular, when the droplet size decreases. We anticipate that our study will provide further insights into the mechanisms of nanoscale directional motion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4990436DOI Listing
June 2017

Conformations and orientational ordering of semiflexible polymers in spherical confinement.

J Chem Phys 2017 May;146(19):194907

Institute of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz, Germany.

Semiflexible polymers in lyotropic solution confined inside spherical nanoscopic "containers" with repulsive walls are studied by molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory, as a first step to model confinement effects on stiff polymers inside of miniemulsions, vesicles, and cells. It is shown that the depletion effects caused by the monomer-wall repulsion depend distinctly on the radius R of the sphere. Further, nontrivial orientational effects occur when R, the persistence length ℓ, and the contour length L of the polymers are of similar magnitude. At intermediate densities, a "shell" of wall-attached chains is forming, such that the monomers belonging to those chains are in a layer at about the distance of one monomer from the container wall. At the same time, the density of the centers of mass of these chains is peaked somewhat further inside, but still near the wall. However, the arrangement of chains is such that the total monomer density is almost uniform in the sphere, apart from a small layering peak at the wall. It is shown that excluded volume effects among the monomers are crucial to account for this behavior, although they are negligible for comparable isolated single semiflexible chains of the same length.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4983131DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5438305PMC
May 2017

Semiflexible polymers confined in a slit pore with attractive walls: two-dimensional liquid crystalline order versus capillary nematization.

Soft Matter 2017 Mar;13(9):1888-1903

Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz, 55099 Mainz, Germany.

Semiflexible polymers under good solvent conditions interacting with attractive planar surfaces are investigated by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and classical Density Functional Theory (DFT). A bead-spring type potential complemented by a bending potential is used, allowing variation of chain stiffness from completely flexible coils to rod-like polymers whose persistence length by far exceeds their contour length. Solvent is only implicitly included, monomer-monomer interactions being purely repulsive, while two types of attractive wall-monomer interactions are considered: (i) a strongly attractive Mie-type potential, appropriate for a strictly structureless wall, and (ii) a corrugated wall formed by Lennard-Jones particles arranged on a square lattice. It is found that in dilute solutions the former case leads to the formation of a strongly adsorbed surface layer, and the profile of density and orientational order in the z-direction perpendicular to the wall is predicted by DFT in nice agreement with MD. While for very low bulk densities a Kosterlitz-Thouless type transition from the isotropic phase to a phase with power-law decay of nematic correlations is suggested to occur in the strongly adsorbed layer, for larger densities a smectic-C phase in the surface layer is detected. No "capillary nematization" effect at higher bulk densities is found in this system, unlike systems with repulsive walls. This finding is attributed to the reduction of the bulk density (in the center of the slit pore) due to polymer adsorption on the attractive wall, for a system studied in the canonical ensemble. Consequently in a system with two attractive walls nematic order in the slit pore can occur only at a higher density than for a bulk system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c7sm00105cDOI Listing
March 2017

Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Microphase Separation in Mixed Thiol Monolayers on Silver Nanoparticles.

ACS Nano 2016 11 18;10(11):9871-9878. Epub 2016 Oct 18.

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Virginia , 102 Engineers Way, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904, United States.

Silver nanoparticles with mixed ligand self-assembled monolayers were synthesized from dodecanethiol and another ligand from a homologous series of alkanethiols (butanethiol, pentanethiol, heptanethiol, octanethiol, nonanethiol, decanethiol, undecanethiol, or dodecanethiol[D25]). These were hypothesized to exhibit ligand phase separation that increases with degree of physical mismatch between the ligands based on the difference in the number of carbons in the two ligands. Dodecanethiol/dodecanethiol[D25] was expected to exhibit minimal phase separation as the ligands have only isotopic differences, while dodecanethiol/butanethiol was hypothesized to exhibit the most phase separation due to the difference in chain length. Phase separation of all other ligand mixtures was expected to fall between these two extremes. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectroscopy provided a value for ligand phase separation by comparison with a binomial (random) model and subsequent calculation of the sum-of-squares error (SSR). These nanoparticle systems were also modeled using the Scheutjens and Fleer self-consistent mean-field theory (SCFT), which determined the most thermodynamically favorable arrangement of ligands on the surface. From MALDI, it was found that dodecanethiol/dodecanethiol[D25] formed a well-mixed monolayer with SSR = 0.002, and dodecanethiol/butanethiol formed a microphase separated monolayer with SSR = 0.164; in intermediate dodecanethiol/alkanethiol mixtures, SSR increased with increasing ligand length difference as expected. For comparison with experiment, an effective SSR value was calculated from SCFT simulations. The SSR values obtained by experiment and theory show good agreement and provide strong support for the validity of SCFT predictions of monolayer structure. These approaches represent robust methods of characterization for ligand phase separation on silver nanoparticles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsnano.6b02091DOI Listing
November 2016

Concentration-induced planar-to-homeotropic anchoring transition of stiff ring polymers on hard walls.

Soft Matter 2016 Sep;12(38):7983-7994

Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090, Vienna, Austria.

We study the structure and interfacial ordering of stiff ring polymers close to repulsive walls. For this purpose, we employ an anisotropic effective model in which the rings are pictured as soft, penetrable discs [P. Poier, C. N. Likos, A. J. Moreno and R. Blaak, Macromolecules, 2015, 48, 4983]. We have studied this model in the bulk and in the presence of a wall, employing Density Functional Theory and computer simulations. While the Ornstein-Zernike equation in combination with the Hypernetted Chain Approximation gives results that are in quantitative agreement with computer simulations, a simple Mean Field approximation strongly overestimates the interaction between the effective particles in the bulk. We discover that by increasing density one can induce a reorientation of the effective rings in the vicinity of a wall, which prefer to orient themselves parallel to the surface (face-on or planar) for low densities ρ and reorient orthogonal to the wall (edge-on or homeotropic) for higher values of ρ. This transition in the surface-structure can be observed in both computer simulations, as well as in an appropriate density functional theory. We trace its physical origin in the penetrable character of the rings, which allows for a reduction of the surface tension contribution due to ring-ring interactions upon the emergence of homeotropic ordering on the wall and increasing the density of the system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c6sm01453dDOI Listing
September 2016

Semiflexible Polymers in the Bulk and Confined by Planar Walls.

Polymers (Basel) 2016 Aug 10;8(8). Epub 2016 Aug 10.

Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz, 55099 Mainz, Germany.

Semiflexible polymers in solution under good solvent conditions can undergo an isotropic-nematic transition. This transition is reminiscent of the well-known entropically-driven transition of hard rods described by Onsager's theory, but the flexibility of the macromolecules causes specific differences in behavior, such as anomalous long wavelength fluctuations in the ordered phase, which can be understood by the concept of the deflection length. A brief review of the recent progress in the understanding of these problems is given, summarizing results obtained by large-scale molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory. These results include also the interaction of semiflexible polymers with hard walls and the wall-induced nematic order, which can give rise to capillary nematization in thin film geometry. Various earlier theoretical approaches to these problems are briefly mentioned, and an outlook on the status of experiments is given. It is argued that in many cases of interest, it is not possible to describe the scaled densities at the isotropic-nematic transition as functions of the ratio of the contour length and the persistence length alone, but the dependence on the ratio of chain diameter and persistence length also needs to be considered.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/polym8080296DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6432127PMC
August 2016

A new insight into the isotropic-nematic phase transition in lyotropic solutions of semiflexible polymers: density-functional theory tested by molecular dynamics.

Soft Matter 2016 Jun 11;12(22):4944-59. Epub 2016 May 11.

Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22901, USA.

Semiflexible polymers in solution are studied for a wide range of both contour length L and persistence length lp as a function of monomer concentration under good solvent conditions. Both density-functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods are used, and a very good agreement between both techniques is observed for rather stiff polymers. Evidence for a new mechanism of order parameter fluctuations in the nematic phase is presented, namely collective deformations of bundles of wormlike chains twisted around each other, and the typical wavelengths and amplitudes of these modes are estimated. These long wavelength fluctuations cause a reduction of the order parameter in comparison with the DFT prediction. It is also found that DFT becomes unreliable for rather flexible polymers in predicting that the transition from the isotropic (I)-phase to the nematic (N)-phase still exists at very high monomer concentrations (which in reality does not occur). However, under conditions when DFT is accurate, it provides reliable predictions also for the width of the I-N two-phase coexistence region, which are difficult to obtain from MD in spite of the use of very large systems (up to 500 000 monomers) by means of graphics processing units (GPU). For short and not very stiff chains, a pre-transitional chain stretching is found in the isotropic phase near the I-N-transition, not predicted by theories. A comparison with theoretical predictions by Khokhlov-Semenov, Odijk, and Chen reveals that the scaled transition densities are not simply functions of L/lp only, as these theories predict, but depend on d/lp (where d is the chain diameter) as well. Chain properties in the nematically ordered phase are compared to those of chains confined in tubes, and the deflection length concept is tested. Eventually, some consequences for the interpretation of experiments are spelled out.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c6sm00778cDOI Listing
June 2016

Anomalous Fluctuations of Nematic Order in Solutions of Semiflexible Polymers.

Phys Rev Lett 2016 May 5;116(18):187801. Epub 2016 May 5.

Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz, 55099 Mainz, Germany.

The nematic ordering in semiflexible polymers with contour length L exceeding their persistence length ℓ_{p} is described by a confinement of the polymers in a cylinder of radius r_{eff} much larger than the radius r_{ρ} expected from the respective concentration of the solution. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations combined with density functional theory are used to locate the isotropic-nematic (I-N) transition and to validate this cylindrical confinement. Anomalous fluctuations due to chain deflections from neighboring chains in the nematic phase are proposed. Considering deflections as collective excitations in the nematically ordered phase of semiflexible polymers elucidates the origins of shortcomings in the description of the I-N transition by existing theories.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.187801DOI Listing
May 2016

Semiflexible polymers under good solvent conditions interacting with repulsive walls.

J Chem Phys 2016 May;144(17):174902

Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz, 55099 Mainz, Germany.

Solutions of semiflexible polymers confined by repulsive planar walls are studied by density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulations, to clarify the competition between the chain alignment favored by the wall and the depletion caused by the monomer-wall repulsion. A coarse-grained bead-spring model with a bond bending potential is studied, varying both the contour length and the persistence length of the polymers, as well as the monomer concentration in the solution (good solvent conditions are assumed throughout, and solvent molecules are not included explicitly). The profiles of monomer density and pressure tensor components near the wall are studied, and the surface tension of the solution is obtained. While the surface tension slightly decreases with chain length for flexible polymers, it clearly increases with chain length for stiff polymers. Thus, at fixed density and fixed chain length, the surface tension also increases with increasing persistence length. Chain ends always are enriched near the wall, but this effect is much larger for stiff polymers than for flexible ones. Also the profiles of the mean square gyration radius components near the wall and the nematic order parameter are studied to clarify the conditions where wall-induced nematic order occurs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4947254DOI Listing
May 2016

Activity mediated phase separation: Can we understand phase behavior of the nonequilibrium problem from an equilibrium approach?

J Chem Phys 2016 Apr;144(14):144902

Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Staudinger Weg 7, 55128 Mainz, Germany.

We present results for structure and dynamics of mixtures of active and passive particles, from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and integral equation theory (IET) calculations, for a physically motivated model. The perfectly passive limit of the model corresponds to the phase-separating Asakura-Oosawa model for colloid-polymer mixtures in which, for the present study, the colloids are made self-propelling by introducing activity in accordance with the well known Vicsek model. Such activity facilitates phase separation further, as confirmed by our MD simulations and IET calculations. Depending upon the composition of active and passive particles, the diffusive motion of the active species can only be realized at large time scales. Despite this, we have been able to construct an equilibrium approach to obtain the structural properties of such inherently out-of-equilibrium systems. In this method, effective inter-particle potentials were constructed via IET by taking structural inputs from the MD simulations of the active system. These potentials in turn were used in passive MD simulations, results from which are observed to be in fair agreement with the original ones.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4945365DOI Listing
April 2016

Elasticity of polymeric nanocolloidal particles.

Sci Rep 2015 Nov 2;5:15854. Epub 2015 Nov 2.

Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia.

Softness is an essential mechanical feature of macromolecular particles such as polymer-grafted nanocolloids, polyelectrolyte networks, cross-linked microgels as well as block copolymer and dendrimer micelles. Elasticity of individual particles directly controls their swelling, wetting, and adsorption behaviour, their aggregation and self-assembly as well as structural and rheological properties of suspensions. Here we use numerical simulations and self-consistent field theory to study the deformation behaviour of a single spherical polymer brush upon diametral compression. We observe a universal response, which is rationalised using scaling arguments and interpreted in terms of two coarse-grained models. At small and intermediate compressions the deformation can be accurately reproduced by modelling the brush as a liquid drop, whereas at large compressions the brush behaves as a soft ball. Applicable far beyond the pairwise-additive small-strain regime, the models may be used to describe microelasticity of nanocolloids in severe confinement including dense disordered and crystalline phases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep15854DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4629145PMC
November 2015

Semiflexible polymer brushes and the brush-mushroom crossover.

Soft Matter 2015 Apr;11(13):2604-16

Institute of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz, Germany.

Semiflexible polymers end-grafted to a repulsive planar substrate under good solvent conditions are studied by scaling arguments, computer simulations, and self-consistent field theory. Varying the chain length N, persistence length lp, and grafting density σg, the chain linear dimensions and distribution functions of all monomers and of the free chain ends are studied. Particular attention is paid to the limit of very small σg, where the grafted chains behave as "mushrooms" no longer interacting with each other. Unlike a flexible mushroom, which has a self-similar structure from the size (a) of an effective monomer up to the mushroom height (h/a ∝ N(v), ν ≈ 3/5), a semiflexible mushroom (like a free semiflexible chain) exhibits three different scaling regimes, h/a ∝ N for contour length L = Na < lp, a Gaussian regime, h/a ∝ (Llp)(1/2)/a for lp ≪ L ≪ R* ∝ (lp(2)/a), and a regime controlled by excluded volume, h/a ∝ (lp/a)(1/5)N(ν). The semiflexible brush is predicted to scale as h/a ∝ (lpaσg)(1/3)N in the excluded volume regime, and h/a ∝ (lpa(3)σ(2))(1/4)N in the Gaussian regime. Since in the volume taken by a semiflexible mushroom excluded-volume interactions are much weaker in comparison to a flexible mushroom, there occurs an additional regime where semiflexible mushrooms overlap without significant chain stretching. Moreover, since the size of a semiflexible mushroom is much larger than the size of a flexible mushroom with the same N, the crossover from mushroom to brush behavior is predicted to take place at much smaller densities than for fully flexible chains. The numerical results, however, confirm the scaling predictions only qualitatively; for chain lengths that are relevant for experiments, often intermediate effective exponents are observed due to extended crossovers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c4sm02862gDOI Listing
April 2015

Critical adsorption of a single macromolecule in polymer brushes.

Soft Matter 2014 Aug;10(32):5974-90

Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, D-55099 Mainz, Germany.

The adsorption of long flexible macromolecules by polymer brush-coated surfaces is studied by molecular dynamics simulations and by calculations using density functional and self-consistent field theories. The case of repulsive interactions between the substrate surface and the monomers of both the brush polymers and the extra chains that can get absorbed into the brush is considered. Under good solvent conditions, critical absorption can occur, if the interaction between the monomers of the brush polymers and the extra chain is (weakly) attractive. It is shown that it is possible to map out the details of the critical absorption transition, if the chain length and/or the grafting density of the brush polymers are varied. In this way both the strength and the range of the effective adsorption potential of the substrate surface can be controlled. However, it is found that in the general case there is no straightforward mapping of the present problem to the simpler problem of polymer adsorption in a square well potential, in contrast to suggestions in the literature. In particular, it is found that the fraction of monomers of the long free chain that is absorbed in the brush shows a nonmonotonic variation with the grafting density; i.e. from dense brushes free chains are again expelled from their interior. For strong attraction the free chain then gets adsorbed at the brush-solution interface.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c4sm00688gDOI Listing
August 2014

Phase behavior of active swimmers in depletants: molecular dynamics and integral equation theory.

Phys Rev Lett 2014 May 15;112(19):198301. Epub 2014 May 15.

Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Staudinger Weg 7, 55128 Mainz, Germany.

We study the structure and phase behavior of a binary mixture where one of the components is self-propelling in nature. The interparticle interactions in the system are taken from the Asakura-Oosawa model for colloid-polymer mixtures for which the phase diagram is known. In the current model version, the colloid particles are made active using the Vicsek model for self-propelling particles. The resultant active system is studied by molecular dynamics methods and integral equation theory. Both methods produce results consistent with each other and demonstrate that the Vicsek model-based activity facilitates phase separation, thus, broadening the coexistence region.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.198301DOI Listing
May 2014

Interactions between polymer brush-coated spherical nanoparticles: the good solvent case.

J Chem Phys 2011 Dec;135(21):214902

Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, 55099 Mainz, Staudinger Weg 7, Germany.

The interaction between two spherical polymer brushes is studied by molecular dynamics simulation varying both the radius of the spherical particles and their distance, as well as the grafting density and the chain length of the end-grafted flexible polymer chains. A coarse-grained bead-spring model is used to describe the macromolecules, and purely repulsive monomer-monomer interactions are taken throughout, restricting the study to the good solvent limit. Both the potential of mean force between the particles as a function of their distance is computed, for various choices of the parameters mentioned above, and the structural characteristics are discussed (density profiles, average end-to-end distance of the grafted chains, etc.). When the nanoparticles approach very closely, some chains need to be squeezed out into the tangent plane in between the particles, causing a very steep rise of the repulsive interaction energy between the particles. We consider as a complementary method the density functional theory approach. We find that the quantitative accuracy of the density functional theory is limited to large nanoparticle separation and short chain length. A brief comparison to Flory theory and related work on other models also is presented.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3663964DOI Listing
December 2011

Spherical polymer brushes under good solvent conditions: molecular dynamics results compared to density functional theory.

J Chem Phys 2010 Nov;133(18):184901

Institut für Physik, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, D-55099 Mainz, Germany.

A coarse grained model for flexible polymers end-grafted to repulsive spherical nanoparticles is studied for various chain lengths and grafting densities under good solvent conditions by molecular dynamics methods and density functional theory. With increasing chain length, the monomer density profile exhibits a crossover to the star polymer limit. The distribution of polymer ends and the linear dimensions of individual polymer chains are obtained, while the inhomogeneous stretching of the chains is characterized by the local persistence lengths. The results on the structure factor of both single chain and full spherical brush as well as the range of applicability of the different theoretical tools are presented. Finally, a brief discussion of the experiment is given.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3494902DOI Listing
November 2010

Dispersing nanotubes with surfactants: a microscopic statistical mechanical analysis.

J Am Chem Soc 2005 Oct;127(41):14124-5

Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22901, USA.

A first theoretical study of surfactant-stabilized carbon nanotube dispersions is presented. Density functional theory is used to compute potential of mean force between nanotubes in an aqueous solution of cationic surfactant n-decyltrimethylammonium chloride. In agreement with experimental results, it is found that stable dispersions can be prepared for surfactant bulk concentrations below the critical micelle concentration. Computed density profiles of head and tail segments indicate that surfactants adsorb on nanotube surfaces in a random fashion rather than form cylindrical micelles, which is also in agreement with recent small-angle neutron scattering measurements.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ja0530570DOI Listing
October 2005

Interaction between irreversibly adsorbed polymer layers: Is the mean field picture really inadequate?

Phys Rev E Stat Nonlin Soft Matter Phys 2004 Apr 16;69(4 Pt 1):041801. Epub 2004 Apr 16.

Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904, USA.

We found out that the mean-field theory (MFT), if done consistently, is in good agreement with experimental observations for the force between irreversibly adsorbed polymer layers. This result is fairly unexpected in light of the conventional Cahn-de Gennes mean-field (CdGMF) theory that claims this force is zero. We reexamine the CdGMF equations and show that the consistency of the CdGMF approach is broken. This motivated us to derive an equation for the polymer density on the adsorbing surface that describes a minimum of the surface free energy. This equation replaces the conventional boundary condition used in CdGMF. The disjoining pressure is calculated by making use of the developed theory. An excellent agreement with the experimental results is indicated. We believe that our findings rehabilitate the mean-field theory as one of the most powerful tools for investigating the polymer-mediated interaction between colloids. Our result show that the unphysical predictions of CdGMF are due to its inconsistency rather than because this approach is "completely inadequate to discuss the plate-plate interactions in good solvent" [Macromolecules 15, 492 (1982)]].
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevE.69.041801DOI Listing
April 2004