Publications by authors named "Sepideh Nemati"

8 Publications

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Development and implementation of water safety plans for groundwater resources in the southernmost city of West Azerbaijan Province, Iran.

J Environ Health Sci Eng 2020 Dec 8;18(2):629-637. Epub 2020 Jun 8.

Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Public Health, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

The transfer of water from the source to the consumption point is always associated with the possibility of contamination in any of its various components. To resolve this problem, the World Health Organization has considered a water safety plan. The purpose of this study is to implement water safety plan in the water supply system of Bukan city. This study was performed on Bukan's water supply system in 2019-20 using a software to guarantee the quality of the water safety plan and the WHO and IWA guidelines. The software checklists were prepared and after confirming the validity of the translation and its facial and content validity, it was completed based on the records of the Water and Sewerage Company and interviews with experts. Out of a total of 440 points of full-application of the program and 392 points for the reviewed phases, 183.6 points were acquired and 43.7% of WSP-coordinated implementation was observed. The highest percentage of WSP-coordinated implementation (75.2%) was assigned to the validation stage with the highest point, and the support program stage had the lowest percentage of performance (1.1%). Among the major components of the water supply system, the final consumption point received the most attention from the system. Given the lifespan of the introduction and use of WSP in the world, it was expected that better results would be obtained from evaluating the implementation and progress of this approach in Bukan's water supply system. However, the implementation rate of this program in this city compared to other cities in Iran, showed that according to the implementation time (one year), the obtained results are relatively convincing and good and the water supply system has a moderate level of safety.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40201-020-00488-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7721941PMC
December 2020

Comparing THMs level in old and new water distribution systems; seasonal variation and probabilistic risk assessment.

Ecotoxicol Environ Saf 2020 Apr 6;192:110286. Epub 2020 Feb 6.

Non-communicable Disease Research Center, Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Public Health, Sabzevar University of Medical Sciences, Sabzevar, Iran. Electronic address:

Trihalomethanes (THMs) in drinking water are associated with many chemical parameters in water. However, the available evidence on the relationship between physical parameters of the water distribution system (WDS) and THMs is still scarce; therefore, this study aimed to compare the THMs concentration in the old and new WDS in Yazd, Iran. Moreover, we investigated the seasonal trend and health risk assessment of exposure to THMs through ingestion, dermal, and inhalation pathways. Mann-Whitney test was applied to compare THMs between old and new WDS as well as fall season and winter season. The order of THM concentrations was: chloroform > BDCM > DBCM > bromoform. The maximum levels of THMs in the fall and winter were 31 and 39 ppb, respectively, which were less than the WHO recommended limits for drinking water, i.e., <200 ppb. There was a significant difference between the concentration of BDCM in autumn and winter (P-value = 0.01). There was a marginally significant difference between THM concentration in the autumn and winter (P-value 0.09). The total concentration of THMs and chloroform in the old WDS were significantly higher than the new WDS. The mean values of lifetime cancer risks (LTCR) for oral, dermal, and inhalation exposure pathways to THMs were in the acceptable and low-risk levels. The inhalation exposure pathway had the highest LTCR from among the three mentioned exposure pathways. The hazard index was found to be < 1 through oral and dermal pathways. Moreover, the sensitivity analysis revealed that the ingestion rate for oral exposure, the exposure time for dermal and exposure duration for the inhalation exposure pathway had the highest impact on chronic daily intake (CDI). Our finding confirmed that THM concentration in tap water was associated with the lifespan of WDS and this finding could be useful for urban planners and decision-makers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoenv.2020.110286DOI Listing
April 2020

Spatial analysis and risk assessment of urban BTEX compounds in Urmia, Iran.

Chemosphere 2020 May 31;246:125769. Epub 2019 Dec 31.

Non-Communicable Disease Research Center, Department of Environmental Health, School of Health, Sabzevar University of Medical Sciences, Sabzevar, Iran. Electronic address:

Land Use Regression models (LUR) are the most common tools to estimate intra-urban air pollutant exposure in epidemiological studies. However, number of available and published models in developing and middle up income countries is still scarce. Here, we developed seasonal and overall LUR models for the spatial distribution of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) based on 20 monitoring stations and 166 potentially predictive variables (PPVs) in Urmia, Iran. Carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risks of exposure to BTEX and its sensitivity analysis were assessed using a probabilistic approach. The mean and standard deviation (in brackets) of overall benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene were 12.83 (16.19), 27.03 (32.00), 4.72 (4.15) and 27.35 (29.36) μg/m, respectively. In all models the R value of LUR models of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene and total BTEX ranged from 0.66 to 0.85, 0.61, 0.88, 0.72 to 0.94, 0.75 to 0.84 and 0.67 to 0.93. The root mean square error (RMSE) for leave-one-out cross-validations (LOOCV) for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene ranged from 7.48 to 10.31, 23.0 to 30.0, 3.40 to 6.90, 16.27 to 24.49, 36.10-50.0 μg/m, respectively. The estimated lifetime carcinogenic risk (LTCR) indicated that ambient concentration of benzene is at a risk level for Urmia inhabitants (LTCR >10). Sensitivity analysis for LTCR model indicated that concentration of benzene (C) was the most effective variable in increasing the carcinogenic risk (correlation coefficient ranged from 0.97 to 0.98 for all models).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2019.125769DOI Listing
May 2020

Data on THMs concentration and spatial trend in water distribution network (a preliminary study in center of Iran).

MethodsX 2019 3;6:760-763. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

Student Research Committee, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran.

The Trihalomethanes (THMs) formed due to a reaction between water disinfection chlorine and some natural organic matters, as chlorinated by products. The aim of this study was determination of THMs values and spatial trend in Yazd city water distribution network, in center of Iran. Sampling of tap water was done in two autumn and winter seasons. The THMs value were measured by using a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS), Agilent Company 6890 N. The spatial analysis of THMs values was carried out using ArcGIS 10.1 to show the spatial spreading. The Kriging method was used to draw distribution maps. Using the Kriging method to illustrate the difference or precision of forecasts is relatively easy compared to the other interpolation methods. Also, the acceptable level of % RMSE (Root mean square error) was calculated for Kriging method (% RMSE > 40). Thus, this protocol as integrated between data and geraphic could easily used for reporting of THMs level in studies of water distribution network. Finally, the maximum THMs value were obtained lower than USEPA and WHO guidelines for drinking water (THMs < 40 ppb).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mex.2019.03.030DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6462497PMC
April 2019

Assessment of hospitalization and mortality from exposure to PM using AirQ modeling in Ilam, Iran.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2017 Sep 3;24(27):21791-21796. Epub 2017 Aug 3.

Student Research Committee, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran.

The aims of this study were to assess the health impact of PM on inhabitants and to investigate the trend of PM concentrations in Ilam, Iran, from 2012 to 2015. For these aims, daily average concentration of PM was obtained from continuous monitoring stations in the study area. Mortality and morbidity due to PM were assessed by AirQ software developed by World Health Organization (WHO). Based on the results, the annual mean concentrations of PM in all of years were more than WHO guideline and PM concentration had a decreasing trend in this study period. Total mortality attributed to PM was found to be 49 cases in 2012, 25 in 2013, and 33 in 2014. Hospital admission due to respiratory diseases was the most impact due to PM Increase in relative risk (RR) with every 10 μg/m increase in PM from 2012 to 2015 years for total mortality, respiratory disease hospitalization, and hospital admissions were 0.6, 0.8, and 0.9%, respectively. The results of this study indicated that air pollution is one of the major problems in this urban area and AirQ model as simple tool can help to design preventive and controlling programs in order to reduce human health effects of pollutants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-017-9794-7DOI Listing
September 2017

Predicting the capability of carboxymethyl cellulose-stabilized iron nanoparticles for the remediation of arsenite from water using the response surface methodology (RSM) model: Modeling and optimization.

J Contam Hydrol 2017 08 20;203:85-92. Epub 2017 Jun 20.

Students Research Office, Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Health, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of carboxymethyl cellulose-stabilized iron nanoparticles (C-nZVI) for the removal of arsenite ions from aqueous solutions. Iron nanoparticles and carboxymethyl cellulose-stabilized iron nanoparticles were freshly synthesized. The synthesized nanomaterials had a size of 10nm approximately. The transmission electron microscope (TEM) images depicted bulkier dendrite flocs of non-stabilized iron nanoparticles. It described nanoscale particles as not discrete resulting from the aggregation of particles. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image showed that C-nZVI is approximately discrete, well-dispersed and an almost spherical shape. The energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDAX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum confirmed the presence of Fe in the C-nZVI composite. The central composite design under the Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was employed in order to investigate the effect of independent variables on arsenite removal and to determine the optimum condition. The reduced full second-order model indicated a well-fitted model since the experimental values were in good agreement with it. Therefore, this model is used for the prediction and optimization of arsenite removal from water. The maximum removal efficiency was estimated to be 100% when all parameters are considered simultaneously. The predicted optimal conditions for the maximum removal efficiency were achieved with initial arsenite concentration, 0.68mgL; C-nZVI, 0.3 (gL); time, 31.25 (min) and pH, 5.2.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jconhyd.2017.06.005DOI Listing
August 2017

Arsenic Intake through Consumed Rice in Iran: Markets Role or Government Responsibility.

Health Promot Perspect 2014 30;4(2):180-6. Epub 2014 Dec 30.

Center of Student Researches, Yazd University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran.

Background: the present study investigated arsenic content in Iranian, imported rice on sale in Tabriz (fourth most populous city of Iran) market, and assesses daily arsenic intake from rice.

Methods: A total of 33 locally available rice samples from different brands were collected and then wet and dry ashing digestion procedures were compared for decomposition of them before analyzing by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS).

Results: The mean arsenic concentration in Iranian rice was 0.065 mg/kg versus 0.082 mg/kg in imported samples. There was no significant difference between arsenic concentrations between two groups of samples (P=0.061). The average daily ingestion rate of total arsenic was 0.11 and 0.15 μg/kg body weight from consumption of 110g of Iranian and imported rice respectively.

Conclusion: Based on our estimation, daily dietary intake of arsenic from Iranian and imported rice was approximately 7 and 9 μg/day for local population, respectively.All of the rice grains that were sampled from Tabriz market were low in total arsenic compared to the standard. Nonetheless regular monitoring of all rice varieties should be continued.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5681/hpp.2014.024DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4300444PMC
February 2015

Removal of Arsenic (III, V) from aqueous solution by nanoscale zero-valent iron stabilized with starch and carboxymethyl cellulose.

J Environ Health Sci Eng 2014 24;12:74. Epub 2014 Apr 24.

Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Health, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

In this work, synthetic nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) stabilized with two polymers, Starch and Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were examined and compared for their ability in removing As (III) and As (V) from aqueous solutions as the most promising iron nanoparticles form for arsenic removal. Batch operations were conducted with different process parameters such as contact time, nanoparticles concentration, initial arsenic concentration and pH. Results revealed that starch stabilized particles (S-nZVI) presented an outstanding ability to remove both arsenate and arsenite and displayed ~ 36.5% greater removal for As (V) and 30% for As (III) in comparison with CMC-stabilized nanoparticles (C-nZVI). However, from the particle stabilization viewpoint, there is a clear trade off to choosing the best stabilized nanoparticles form. Removal efficiency was enhanced with increasing the contact time and iron loading but reduced with increasing initial As (III, V) concentrations and pH. Almost complete removal of arsenic (up to 500 μg/L) was achieved in just 5 min when the S-nZVI mass concentration was 0.3 g/L and initial solution pH of 7 ± 0.1. The maximum removal efficiency of both arsenic species was obtained at pH = 5 ± 0.1 and starched nanoparticles was effective in slightly acidic and natural pH values. The adsorption kinetics fitted well with pseudo-second-order model and the adsorption data obeyed the Langmuir equation with a maximum adsorption capacity of 14 mg/g for arsenic (V), and 12.2 mg/g for arsenic (III). It could be concluded that starch stabilized Fe(0) nanoparticles showed remarkable potential for As (III, V) removal from aqueous solution e.g. contaminated water.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/2052-336X-12-74DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4013818PMC
May 2014