Publications by authors named "Seonghun Cho"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Highly Durable Supportless Pt Hollow Spheres Designed for Enhanced Oxygen Transport in Cathode Catalyst Layers of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

ACS Appl Mater Interfaces 2016 Oct 10;8(41):27730-27739. Epub 2016 Oct 10.

Fuel Cell Laboratory, Korea Institute of Energy Research (KIER) , Daejeon, 305-343, Republic of Korea.

Supportless Pt catalysts have several advantages over conventional carbon-supported Pt catalysts in that they are not susceptible to carbon corrosion. However, the need for high Pt loadings in membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) to achieve state-of-the-art fuel cell performance has limited their application in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Herein, we report a new approach to the design of a supportless Pt catalyst in terms of catalyst layer architecture, which is crucial for fuel cell performance as it affects water management and oxygen transport in the catalyst layers. Large Pt hollow spheres (PtHSs) 100 nm in size were designed and prepared using a carbon template method. Despite their large size, the unique structure of the PtHSs, which are composed of a thin-layered shell of Pt nanoparticles (ca. 7 nm thick), exhibited a high surface area comparable to that of commercial Pt black (PtB). The PtHS structure also exhibited twice the durability of PtB after 2000 potential cycles (0-1.3 V, 50 mV/s). A MEA fabricated with PtHSs showed significant improvement in fuel cell performance compared to PtB-based MEAs at high current densities (>800 mA/cm). This was mainly due to the 2.7 times lower mass transport resistance in the PtHS-based catalyst layers compared to that in PtB, owing to the formation of macropores between the PtHSs and high porosity (90%) in the PtHS catalyst layers. The present study demonstrates a successful example of catalyst design in terms of catalyst layer architecture, which may be applied to a real fuel cell system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsami.6b08177DOI Listing
October 2016

Self-Supported Mesostructured Pt-Based Bimetallic Nanospheres Containing an Intermetallic Phase as Ultrastable Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts.

Small 2016 Oct 12;12(38):5347-5353. Epub 2016 Aug 12.

School of Energy and Chemical Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 50 UNIST-gil, Ulsan, 44919, Republic of Korea.

Developing highly active and stable cathode catalysts is of pivotal importance for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). While carbon-supported nanostructured Pt-based catalysts have so far been the most active cathode catalysts, their durability and single-cell performance are yet to be improved. Herein, self-supported mesostructured Pt-based bimetallic (Meso-PtM; M = Ni, Fe, Co, Cu) nanospheres containing an intermetallic phase are reported, which can combine the beneficial effects of transition metals (M), an intermetallic phase, a 3D interconnected framework, and a mesoporous structure. Meso-PtM nanospheres show enhanced oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity, compared to Pt black and Pt/C catalysts. Notably, Meso-PtNi containing an intermetallic phase exhibits ultrahigh stability, showing enhanced ORR activity even after 50 000 potential cycles, whereas Pt black and Pt/C undergo dramatic degradation. Importantly, Meso-PtNi with an intermetallic phase also demonstrated superior activity and durability when used in a PEMFC single-cell, with record-high initial mass and specific activities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/smll.201601825DOI Listing
October 2016

Programming of Influenza Vaccine Broadness and Persistence by Mucoadhesive Polymer-Based Adjuvant Systems.

J Immunol 2015 Sep 27;195(5):2472-82. Epub 2015 Jul 27.

Department of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology, Suwon 440-746, South Korea;

The development of an anti-influenza vaccine with the potential for cross-protection against seasonal drift variants as well as occasionally emerging reassortant viruses is essential. In this study, we successfully generated a novel anti-influenza vaccine system combining conserved matrix protein 2 (sM2) and stalk domain of hemagglutinin (HA2) fusion protein (sM2HA2) and poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA)-based vaccine adjuvant systems that can act as a mucoadhesive delivery vehicle of sM2HA2 as well as a robust strategy for the incorporation of hydrophobic immunostimulatory 3-O-desacyl-4'-monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and QS21. Intranasal coadministration of sM2HA2 and the combination adjuvant γ-PGA/MPL/QS21 (CA-PMQ) was able to induce a high degree of protective mucosal, systemic, and cell-mediated immune responses. The sM2HA2/CA-PMQ immunization was able to prevent disease symptoms, confering complete protection against lethal infection with divergent influenza subtypes (H5N1, H1N1, H5N2, H7N3, and H9N2) that lasted for at least 6 mo. Therefore, our data suggest that mucosal administration of sM2HA2 in combination with CA-PMQ could be a potent strategy for a broad cross-protective influenza vaccine, and CA-PMQ as a mucosal adjuvant could be used for effective mucosal vaccines.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.1500492DOI Listing
September 2015

Umbilical portion of recipient's left portal vein: a useful vascular conduit in dual living donor liver transplantation for the thrombosed portal vein.

Liver Transpl 2004 Jun;10(6):802-6

Division of Hepatobiliary Surgery and Liver Transplantation, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

We considered performing living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in a larger-size recipient. When the recipient was large-sized, or when the donor liver was severely steatotic or had a right-to-left volume discrepancy. We devised dual living donor liver transplantation (DLDLT) to make up for graft size insufficiency and to secure the donor's safety. However, portal vein thrombosis (PVT) presented a challenge for DLDLT because of the need for intact right and left portal veins for the implantation of both liver grafts. Our 52-year-old male patient with hepatitis B cirrhosis had suffered from repeated esophageal and gastric variceal bleeding and underwent 2 trials of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). He developed TIPS occlusion and PVT involving the area just above the spleno-mesenteric confluence to the right and left PV. Also, the right PV orifice was destructed and difficult to isolate because of severe periportal inflammation and neointima growth in the TIPS mesh. The patient's two sons were inadequate for donation because of right-to-left volume discrepancy. Therefore, DLDLT using 2 left lobes was necessary to compensate for graft-size insufficiency and to secure donor safety, and we substituted an intact umbilical portion of recipient's left PV for the destroyed right PV. The patient recovered well, and liver function has been normal for more than a year. In conclusion, the umbilical portion of recipient's left PV can be a useful vascular substitute for the reconstruction of a thrombosed main portal branch in DLDLT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/lt.20185DOI Listing
June 2004
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