Publications by authors named "Seok Cheol Kim"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Contrasting early successional dynamics of bacterial and fungal communities in recently deglaciated soils of the maritime Antarctic.

Mol Ecol 2021 09 16;30(17):4231-4244. Epub 2021 Jul 16.

Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI), Incheon, Korea.

Although microorganisms are the very first colonizers of recently deglaciated soils even prior to plant colonization, the drivers and patterns of microbial community succession at early-successional stages remain poorly understood. The successional dynamics and assembly processes of bacterial and fungal communities were compared on a glacier foreland in the maritime Antarctic across the ~10-year soil-age gradient from bare soil to sparsely vegetated area. Bacterial communities shifted more rapidly than fungal communities in response to glacial retreat; species turnover (primarily the transition from glacier- to soil-favouring taxa) contributed greatly to bacterial beta diversity, but this pattern was less clear in fungi. Bacterial communities underwent more predictable (more deterministic) changes along the soil-age gradient, with compositional changes paralleling the direction of changes in soil physicochemical properties following deglaciation. In contrast, the compositional shift in fungal communities was less associated with changes in deglaciation-induced changes in soil geochemistry and most fungal taxa displayed mosaic abundance distribution across the landscape, suggesting that the successional dynamics of fungal communities are largely governed by stochastic processes. A co-occurrence network analysis revealed that biotic interactions between bacteria and fungi are very weak in early succession. Taken together, these results collectively suggest that bacterial and fungal communities in recently deglaciated soils are largely decoupled from each other during succession and exert very divergent trajectories of succession and assembly under different selective forces.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.16054DOI Listing
September 2021

The complete chloroplast genome of an Antarctic moss (Müll.Hal.) R.H. Zander.

Mitochondrial DNA B Resour 2019 Jul 12;4(2):2303-2304. Epub 2019 Jul 12.

Unit of Polar Genomics, Korea Polar Research Institute, Incheon, South Korea.

is one of the common mosses in the northern maritime Antarctic. In this study, we determined the complete chloroplast genome of (GenBank accession number MK852705) to provide a genetic resource for phylogenetic study on Bryophytes. It is of 136,227 bp length, containing 8 ribosomal RNA (rRNA), 37 transfer RNA, and 85 protein-coding genes. The chloroplast genome structure and gene order were similar to other bryophytes. Phylogenetic tree based on combined amino acids sequences of 72 chloroplast genes common in , 7 Bryophyta, 1 Anthocerotophyta, and 2 Marchantiophyta, was congruent with the traditional position of Pottiales in Bryophytes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/23802359.2019.1627945DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7687419PMC
July 2019

Quantification of antigen by digital domain analysis of integrated nanogap biosensors.

Biosens Bioelectron 2017 Nov 8;97:273-277. Epub 2017 Jun 8.

Department of Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University, 2066 Seobu-Ro, Jangan-Gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-Do 440-746, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

Nanogap biosensor shows a distinct conduction change upon sandwich-type immobilization of gold nanoparticle probes onto the gap region in the presence of target biomolecules. Although this large conductance change could be advantageous in distinguishing signal on or off devices, since the extent of conductance change is quite irregular even at the same analyte concentrations, it fails to extract quantitative information from its level of conductance change. In other words, the conductance change of a single device does not reflect the concentration of the target molecule. In this study, we introduce an alternative approach of interpreting the concentration of target molecules using digital domain analysis of integrated nanogap devices, where the fraction of signal-on-devices, or on-device-percentage (ODP), was translated into the concentration of the target molecule. The ODP was found to be closely related to the number density of the immobilized probes and, therefore, to be an excellent measure of the analyte concentration, which was demonstrated in the immuno-selective detection and quantification of influenza A hemagglutinin and prostate specific antigen.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2017.06.012DOI Listing
November 2017

Enhancement of Seed Dehiscence by Seed Treatment with GG01 and GG04 in Ginseng ().

Plant Pathol J 2017 Feb 1;33(1):1-8. Epub 2017 Feb 1.

Organic Agriculture Division, National Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Rural Development of Administration, Wanju 55365, Korea.

Seed dehiscence of ginseng ( C. A. Mayer) is affected by moisture, temperature, storage conditions and microbes. Several microbes were isolated from completely dehisced seed coat of ginseng cultivars, Chunpoong and Younpoong at Gumsan, Korea. We investigated the potential of five isolates from the dehiscence of ginseng seed in four traditional stratification facilities. The isolates showed antagonistic activities against fungal plant pathogens, such as , , , , , and . The dehiscence ratios of ginseng seed increased more than 33% by treatment of GG01, GG02, GG04, GG12, and GG23 in comparison to control (28%). Among the treatments, the reformulating treatment of isolates GG01 and GG04 showed the highest of stratification ratio of ginseng seed. After 16 weeks, the reformulating treatment of isolates GG01 and GG04 significantly enhanced dehiscence of ginseng seed by about 81% compared to the untreated control. The candidate's treatment of GG01 and GG04 showed the highest decreasing rate of 93% in seed coat hardness for 112 days in dehiscence period. The results suggested that the pre-inoculation of GG01 and GG04 found to be very effective applications in improving dehiscence and germination of ginseng seed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5423/PPJ.OA.06.2016.0146DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5291393PMC
February 2017

Intradural spinal metastasis to the cauda equina in renal cell carcinoma: a case report and review of the literature.

Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 2009 Nov;34(24):E892-5

Department of Neurosurgery, Dong Gwang Ju Woori Hospital, Gwangju, Korea.

Study Design: Case description.

Objectives: To describe a case of intradural metastasis from a renal cell carcinoma (RCC) spread to the cauda equina, and review the pertinent medical literature.

Summary Of Background Data: Intradural spinal metastasis is rare, accounting for 6% of all spinal metastases. Only 7 cases of intradural metastasis from a RCC to the cauda equina have been previously reported.

Methods: A 41-year-old male presented with a 1-month history of severe back pain radiating to both legs. The patient underwent a right nephrectomy for treatment of a RCC 1-year before admission. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a well-demarcated, intradural extramedullary mass at the L2 vertebra.

Results: After a total laminectomy, total excision of the tumor was achieved followed by rapid improvement of the back pain. The tumor was histologically verified as metastatic RCC, identical to that of a previous tumor specimen. The patient was asymptomatic on the 1-year follow-up.

Conclusion: Although the majority of cauda equina tumors are primary tumors, intradural metastasis should be considered before surgery in patients with previously treated RCC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BRS.0b013e3181b34e6cDOI Listing
November 2009

Radiological evaluation of the femoral component fixed with interface bioactive bone cement in revision total hip arthroplasty.

J Arthroplasty 2008 Aug 9;23(5):689-93. Epub 2007 Nov 9.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Institute for Joint Replacement, Kyoto Katsura, Hospital, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan.

Thirty cases whose femoral side was operated with interface bioactive bone cement technique in revision total hip arthroplasty for aseptic loosening and followed for more than 6 years were evaluated. The present study includes 2 men and 28 women with an average age at operation of 60 years. Mean postoperative follow-up period was 9 years. Rerevision of femoral component was not found. Possible loosening was observed in 1 case, using the criteria of Harris. Among 21 cases whose cementing grade was assessed as B or C in postoperative x-ray, radiolucent line at bone-cement interface has disappeared before last follow-up in 11 cases. The present study revealed that the good result was obtained using the interface bioactive bone cement technique for reconstruction of aseptic femoral loosening.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arth.2007.05.042DOI Listing
August 2008
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