Publications by authors named "Selvakumar Haridoss"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effect of Sustained Interventions from Infancy to Toddlerhood in Children with Cleft Lip and Palate for Preventing Early Childhood Caries.

Caries Res 2021 Jul 22:1-9. Epub 2021 Jul 22.

Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Pushpagiri College of Dental Sciences, Thiruvalla, India.

The study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of sustained interventions in children with cleft lip and palate (CLP) for preventing early childhood caries (ECC). This prospective, nonrandomized interventional cohort study was conducted in infants aged 0-12 months with congenital CLP. Interventions were given to parents/primary caregivers in the form of combined oral health-care measures (sterile wet gauze piece, finger brush, toothbrush, and toothpaste) by a motivational interviewing approach. Education of primary caregivers on oral hygiene was provided by audiovisual aids and demonstration. Reinforcement of the prescribed regimen was done through daily short message services in caregivers' preferred language and bimonthly telephone calls. Participants were followed up for 9-32 months from the time of recruitment, with a mean period of 18.3 ± 5.1 months. Rates of dental caries were represented as prevalence rates, incidence density, and transitional probability. The distribution of the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) scores on different tooth surfaces affected in the intervention group was compared descriptively with that of the age- and sex-matched historical control groups. On analysis of surface-wise distribution of the ICDAS scores in the intervention group (n = 1,919), 1.2% (n = 24) had noncavitated lesions (ICDAS codes 1 and 2), 0.88% (n = 17) had cavitated lesions (ICDAS codes 3-6), and 0.26% (n = 5) had both cavitated and noncavitated lesions (ICDAS codes 1-6). The incidence density of caries-affected children observed at the first and last follow-ups was 1.2 persons/100 person-months and 1.3 persons/100 person-months of observation, respectively. The incidence density of new caries-affected tooth surfaces at the first and last follow-ups was 0.163 surfaces/100 surface-months and 0.062 surfaces/100 surface-months, respectively. Maxillary first molars had the maximum transition from sound to the cavitated lesion (11.5%), followed by maxillary incisors from sound to noncavitated (7.5%) at the last follow-up. Based on the newly developed assessment criteria in our study, sustained interventions proved to be significantly effective in preventing ECC in children with CLP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000517210DOI Listing
July 2021

Computed Tomographic Evaluation of K3 Rotary and Stainless Steel K File Instrumentation in Primary Teeth.

J Clin Diagn Res 2016 Jan 1;10(1):ZC05-8. Epub 2016 Jan 1.

Reader, Department of Pedodontics, S.R.M Dental College, SRM University , Chennai, Chennai, India .

Introduction: The intention of root canal preparation is to reduce infected content and create a root canal shape allowing for a well condensed root filling. Therefore, it is not necessary to remove excessive dentine for successful root canal preparation and concern must be taken not to over instrument as perforations can occur in the thin dentinal walls of primary molars.

Aim: This study was done to evaluate the time preparation, the risk of lateral perforation and dentine removal of the stainless steel K file and K3 rotary instrumentation in primary teeth.

Materials And Methods: Seventy-five primary molars were selected and divided into three groups. Using spiral computed tomography the teeth were scanned before instrumentation. Teeth were prepared using a stainless steel K file for manual technique. All the canals were prepared up to file size 35. In K3 rotary files (.02 taper) instrumentation was done up to 35 size file. In K3 rotary files (.04 taper) the instrumentation was done up to 25 size file and simultaneously the instrumentation time was recorded. The instrumented teeth were once again scanned and the images were compared with the images of the uninstrumented canals.

Statistical Analysis: Data was statistically analysed using Kruskal Wallis One-way ANOVA, Mann-Whitney U-Test and Pearson's Chi-square Test.

Results: K3 rotary files (.02 taper) removed a significantly less amount of dentine, required less instrumentation time than a stainless steel K file.

Conclusion: K3 files (.02 taper) generated less dentine removal than the stainless steel K file and K3 files (.04 taper). K3 rotary files (.02 taper) were more effective for root canal instrumentation in primary teeth.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7860/JCDR/2016/14183.7028DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4740694PMC
January 2016

Evaluation of canal transportation and centering ability of K 3 (0.02%) and K 3 (0.04%) with hand K files in primary teeth using spiral computed tomography.

J Indian Soc Pedod Prev Dent 2014 Oct-Dec;32(4):286-91

Department of Pedodontics, SRM Dental College, SRM University, Tamil nadu, India.

Background: One of the objectives of root canal preparation is to clean and shape the root canal system while maintaining the original configuration. Therefore, it is important to keep the instruments centered to provide a correct enlargement, without excessive weakening of the root structure.

Aim: The aim of the study was to compare canal transportation and centering ability of K 3 (0.02% taper) and K 3 (0.04% taper) with stainless steel hand K files in primary teeth using a spiral computed tomography (SCT) scan.

Materials And Methods: A total of 75 extracted mandibular primary second molars was collected. Canals were divided randomly into three groups of 25 teeth each. Group I: K 3 files (0.02% taper), Group II: K 3 (0.04% taper), and Group III: Stainless steel hand K files. Three regions from apical, mid-root, and coronal levels of the canal were recorded. All the teeth were scanned before and after instrumentation by using SCT.

Results: K 3 (0.02% taper) showed less canal transportation and a better centering ratio than K 3 (0.04% taper) and stainless steel hand K files.

Statistical Analysis: The mean values were compared between different study groups and the P-value was calculated by using Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA. The Mann-Whitney U-test followed by the Bonferroni correction method was employed to identify the significant groups at the 5% level.

Conclusion: K 3 (0.02% taper) shaped root canals without significant shaping errors when compared to K 3 (0.04% taper) and stainless steel hand K files in primary teeth.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0970-4388.140943DOI Listing
August 2016

Single-rooted primary first mandibular molar.

BMJ Case Rep 2014 Aug 22;2014. Epub 2014 Aug 22.

Sri Ramakrishna Dental College and Hospital, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India.

Morphological variations like single-rooted molar in primary dentition are scarce. Understanding the root canal anatomy and variations is necessary for successful root canal therapy. The purpose of the present article is to report successful endodontic treatment of primary left mandibular first molar with an abnormal morphology of a single root. This case report highlights the importance of knowledge and its applications in the management of anomalous anatomic variants which play a crucial role in the success of endodontic treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2014-206347DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4154040PMC
August 2014

Five canalled and three-rooted primary second mandibular molar.

Case Rep Dent 2014 24;2014:216491. Epub 2014 Jul 24.

Department of Paedodontia, Dr. Sunny Medical Centre, Shahba, Sharjah, UAE.

A thorough knowledge of root canal anatomy and its variation is necessary for successful completion of root canal procedures. Morphological variations such as additional root canals in human deciduous dentition are rare. A mandibular second primary molar with more than four canals is an interesting example of anatomic variations, especially when three of these canals are located in the distal root. This case shows a rare anatomic configuration and points out the importance of looking for additional canals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/216491DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4131494PMC
August 2014

Study of pulp chamber morphology of primary mandibular molars using spiral computed tomography.

J Contemp Dent Pract 2014 Nov 1;15(6):726-9. Epub 2014 Nov 1.

Senior Lecturer, Department of Pedodontics, Sri Ramakrishna Dental College and Hospital, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India.

Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pulp chamber morphology in primary mandibular molars using spiral computed tomography (SCT).

Materials And Methods: Sixty extracted primary mandibular molars were scanned using SCT for the (i) distance between the central fissure to furcation, (ii) distance between the central fissure to the floor of the pulp chamber, (iii) height of the pulp chamber (roof-floor), (iv) distance between the floor of the pulp chamber to the furcation. The mean and standard deviation was analyzed using statistical package for the social sciences (SPSS) program.

Results: The results of this study show that the average mean distance from the central fissure to the floor of the pulp chamber is 5.07 mm in first mandibular primary molar and 5.54 mm in second mandibular primary molar.

Conclusion: It can be concluded that the greatest depth to which a bur can go during access opening without perforating the furcation in first primary mandibular molar is 5.07 mm and 5.54 mm in second primary mandibular molar.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1606DOI Listing
November 2014

Mandibular talon cusp in primary lateral incisor: a rare case report.

Case Rep Dent 2012 25;2012:670745. Epub 2012 Dec 25.

Department of Pedodontics & Preventive Dentistry, Faculty of Dental Sciences, Sri Ramachandra University, Chennai 600116, India.

A talon cusp is a dental anomaly commonly occurring in the permanent dentition compared to the primary dentition. It commonly affects the maxillary anterior teeth. In primary dentition, the most commonly affected tooth is the maxillary central incisors. This is a rare case report of a 5-year-old male patient with a talon cusp affecting the mandibular primary lateral incisor. Recognition and treatment of this anomaly at early stages is important to avoid complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/670745DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3540693PMC
January 2013

Marfan syndrome: a case report.

Case Rep Dent 2012 4;2012:595343. Epub 2012 Dec 4.

Department of Pedodontics, SRM Dental College, SRM University, Chennai 600078, India.

Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant systemic disorder of the connective tissue. Children affected by the Marfan syndrome carry a mutation in one of their two copies of the gene that encodes the connective tissue protein fibrillin-1. Marfan syndrome affects most organs and tissues, especially the skeleton, lungs, eyes, heart, and the large blood vessel that distributes blood from the heart to the rest of the body. A case report of Marfan syndrome has been reported with oral features. The dental problems of the child were treated under general anesthesia and a one-month review showed intact stainless steel crowns' restorations and no signs of secondary caries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/595343DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3529425PMC
January 2013
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