Publications by authors named "Sefik Iğdem"

24 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Oligometastatic Bone Disease in Castration-Sensitive Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT: TROD 09-004 Study.

Clin Nucl Med 2021 06;46(6):465-470

Department of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara.

Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of metastasis-directed treatment (MDT) using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for bone-only oligometastasis (OM) detected with gallium prostate-specific membrane antigen (68Ga-PSMA) PET/CT in castration-sensitive prostate cancer (PC) patients.

Methods: In this multi-institutional study, clinical data of 74 PC patients with 153 bone lesions who were undergoing MDT were retrospectively evaluated. Twenty-seven patients (36.5%) had synchronous, and 47 (63.5%) had metachronous OM. All patients had PC with 5 metastases or fewer detected by 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT and treated using SBRT with a median dose of 20 Gy. The prognostic factors for PC-specific survival (PCSS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed.

Results: The median follow-up was 27.3 months. Patients with synchronous OM were older and received higher rates of androgen deprivation therapy after SBRT compared with patients with metachronous OM. The 2-year PCSS and PFS rates were 92.0% and 72.0%, respectively. A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) decline was observed in 56 patients (75.7%), and 48 (64.9%) had a PSA response defined as at least 25% decrease of PSA after MDT. The 2-year local control rate per lesion was 95.4%. In multivariate analysis, single OM and PSA response after MDT were significant predictors for better PCSS and PFS. In-field recurrence was observed in 4 patients (6.5%) with 10 lesions at a median of 13.1 months after MDT completion. No serious late toxicity was observed.

Conclusions: We demonstrated that SBRT is an efficient and well-tolerated treatment option for PC patients with 5 bone-only oligometastases or fewer detected with 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/RLU.0000000000003558DOI Listing
June 2021

Prognostic factors in medically inoperable early stage lung cancer patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR): Turkish Radiation Oncology Society Multicentric Study.

Clin Respir J 2020 Nov 17;14(11):1050-1059. Epub 2020 Aug 17.

Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Oncology Department, Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey.

Objective: We identified factors influencing outcomes in patients with medically inoperable early stage lung cancer (MIESLC) treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) at 14 centers in Turkey.

Materials And Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 431 patients with stage I-II MIESLC treated with SABR from 2009 through 2017. Age; sex; performance score; imaging technique; tumor histology and size; disease stage radiation dose, fraction and biologically effective dose with an α/β ratio of 10 (BED ); tumor location and treatment center were evaluated for associations with overall survival (OS), local control (LC) and toxicity.

Results: Median follow-up time was 27 months (range 1-115); median SABR dose was 54 Gy (range 30-70) given in a median three fractions (range 1-10); median BED was 151 Gy (range 48-180). Tumors were peripheral in 285 patients (66.1%), central in 69 (16%) and <1 cm from mediastinal structures in 77 (17.9%). Response was evaluated with PET/CT in most cases at a median 3 months after SABR. Response rates were: 48% complete, 36.7% partial, 7.9% stable and 7.4% progression. LC rates were 97.1% at 1 year, 92.6% at 2 years and 91.2% at 3 years; corresponding OS rates were 92.6%, 80.6% and 72.7%. On multivariate analysis, BED > 100 Gy (P = .011), adenocarcinoma (P = .025) and complete response on first evaluation (P = .007) predicted favorable LC. BED > 120 Gy (hazard ratio [HR] 1.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-3.2, P = .019) and tumor size (<2 cm HR 1.9, 95% CI 1.3-3, P = .003) predicted favorable OS. No grade 4-5 acute side effects were observed; late effects were grade ≤3 pneumonitis (18 [4.2%]), chest wall pain (11 [2.5%]) and rib fracture (1 [0.2%]).

Conclusion: SABR produced encouraging results, with satisfactory LC and OS and minimal toxicity. BED > 120 Gy was needed for better LC and OS for large, non-adenocarcinoma tumors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/crj.13240DOI Listing
November 2020

Treatment outcomes of metastasis-directed treatment using Ga-PSMA-PET/CT for oligometastatic or oligorecurrent prostate cancer: Turkish Society for Radiation Oncology group study (TROD 09-002).

Strahlenther Onkol 2020 Nov 2;196(11):1034-1043. Epub 2020 Jul 2.

Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen (Ga-PSMA) positron-emission tomography (PET)/CT-based metastasis-directed treatment (MDT) for oligometastatic prostate cancer (PC).

Methods: In this multi-institutional study, clinical data of 176 PC patients with 353 lesions receiving MDT between 2014 and 2019 were retrospectively evaluated. All patients had biopsy proven PC with ≤5 metastases detected with Ga-PSMA-PET/CT. MDT was delivered with conventional fractionation or stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) techniques. CTCAE v4.0 was used for acute and RTOG/EORTC Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Schema was used for late toxicity evaluation.

Results: At the time of MDT, 59 patients (33.5%) had synchronous and 117 patients (66.5%) had metachronous metastases. Median number of metastases was one and the MDT technique was SBRT in 73.3% patients. The 2‑year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 87.6% and 63.1%, respectively. With a median follow-up of 22.9 months, 9 patients had local recurrence at the irradiated site. The 2‑year local control rate at the treated oligometastatic site per patient was 93.2%. In multivariate analysis, an increased number of oligometastases and untreated primary PC were negative predictors for OS; advanced clinical tumor stage, untreated primary PC, BED3 value of ≤108 Gy, and MDT with conventional fractionation were negative predictors for PFS. No patient experienced grade ≥3 acute toxicity, but one patient had a late grade 3 toxicity of compression fracture after spinal SBRT.

Conclusion: Ga-PSMA-PET/CT-based MDT is an efficient and safe treatment for oligometastatic PC patients. Proper patient selection might improve treatment outcomes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00066-020-01660-6DOI Listing
November 2020

Treatment outcomes of prostate cancer patients with Gleason score 8-10 treated with definitive radiotherapy : TROD 09-001 multi-institutional study.

Strahlenther Onkol 2019 Oct 29;195(10):882-893. Epub 2019 May 29.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, 06100, Ankara, Turkey.

Purpose: To validate the clinical outcomes and prognostic factors in prostate cancer (PCa) patients with Gleason score (GS) 8-10 disease treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) + androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in the modern era.

Methods: Institutional databases of biopsy proven 641 patients with GS 8-10 PCa treated between 2000 and 2015 were collected from 11 institutions. In this multi-institutional Turkish Radiation Oncology Group study, a standard database sheet was sent to each institution for patient enrollment. The inclusion criteria were, T1-T3N0M0 disease according to AJCC (American Joint Committee on Cancer) 2010 Staging System, no prior diagnosis of malignancy, at least 70 Gy total irradiation dose to prostate ± seminal vesicles delivered with either three-dimensional conformal RT or intensity-modulated RT and patients receiving ADT.

Results: The median follow-up time was 5.9 years (range 0.4-18.2 years); 5‑year overall survival (OS), biochemical relapse-free survival (BRFS) and distant metastases-free survival (DMFS) rates were 88%, 78%, and 79%, respectively. Higher RT doses (≥78 Gy) and longer ADT duration (≥2 years) were significant predictors for improved DMFS, whereas advanced stage was a negative prognosticator for DMFS in patients with GS 9-10.

Conclusions: Our results validated the fact that oncologic outcomes after radical EBRT significantly differ in men with GS 8 versus those with GS 9-10 prostate cancer. We found that EBRT dose was important predictive factor regardless of ADT period. Patients receiving 'non-optimal treatment' (RT doses <78 Gy and ADT period <2 years) had the worst treatment outcomes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00066-019-01476-zDOI Listing
October 2019

Replacement of the tumor bed following oncoplastic breast-conserving surgery with immediate latissimus dorsi mini-flap.

Mol Clin Oncol 2016 Oct 9;5(4):365-371. Epub 2016 Aug 9.

Department of Breast Surgery, Florence Nightingale Istanbul Hospital, Istanbul 34387, Turkey.

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the geographic variability of the tumor bed following oncoplastic breast-conserving surgery (OP-BCS), and to assess its relevance for radiotherapy planning. In this prospective study, pre- and postoperative computerized tomography (CT) scans of 22 patients with early-stage breast cancer were fused. The preoperative gross tumor volume or excisional biopsy cavity were contoured under the guidance of preoperative radiological images. Postoperative lumpectomy cavities were contoured under the guidance of surgical clips. The conformity index (CI) was calculated and defined on a scale between 0 and 1, where 0 indicated no overlap and 1 indicated 100% concordance. Associations between CI and the number of clips, time interval between surgery and CT scans, pathological tumor size and age were assessed using independent sample testing. The median CI was 0.07 (in five cases, 1, and in eight cases, 0). The lumpectomy cavity shifted from the primary location in 36.4% of the cases. Median shifts between the isocenters of pre- and postoperative volumes were measured as 1.02 cm (range, 0.4-4.43 cm) in the x, 1.07 cm (range, 0.05-5.67 cm) in the y, and 1.12 cm (range, 0-3.75 cm) in the z directions. Only the clip number was determined to be significantly associated with CI (P=0.017). Pre- and postoperative tumor bed volumes were fully superposed in five of the 22 cases. The present study has shown that the tumor bed is markedly replaced following OP-BCS with latissimus dorsi mini-flap (LDMF) reconstruction. Special care should therefore be taken when defining the lumpectomy cavity following OP-BCS with LDMF reconstruction.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/mco.2016.984DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5038510PMC
October 2016

Outcome and Predictive Factors in Uterine Carcinosarcoma Using Postoperative Radiotherapy: A Rare Cancer Network Study.

Rare Tumors 2016 Jun 29;8(2):6052. Epub 2016 Jun 29.

Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Geneva , Switzerland.

Uterine carcinosarcomas (UCS) are rare tumors. Consensus regarding therapeutic management in non-metastatic disease is lacking. This study reports on outcome and predictive factors when using postoperative radiotherapy. We analyzed a retrospective analysis in 124 women treated between 1987-2007 in the framework of the Rare-Cancer-Network. Median follow-up was 27 months. Postoperative pelvic EBRT was administered in 105 women (85%) and 92 patients (74%) received exclusive or additional vaginal brachytherapy. Five-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), cancer specific survival (CSS) and locoregional control (LRC) were 51.6% (95% CI 35-73%), 53.7% (39-71%), 58.6% (38-74%) and 48% (38-67%). Multivariate analysis showed that external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) >50Gy was an independent prognostic factor for better OS (P=0.03), CSS (P=0.02) and LRC (P=0.01). Relative risks (RR) for better OS (P=0.02), DFS (P=0.04) and LRC (P=0.01) were significantly associated with younger age (≤60 years). Higher brachytherapy (BT)-dose (>9Gy) improved DFS (P=0.04) and LRC (P=0.008). We concluded that UCS has high systemic failure rate. Local relapse was reduced by a relative risk factor of over three in all stages of diseases when using higher doses for EBRT and brachytherapy. Postoperative RT was most effective in UCS stage I/II-diseases.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4081/rt.2016.6052DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4935818PMC
June 2016

The Prognostic Impact of Molecular Subtypes and Very Young Age on Breast Conserving Surgery in Early Stage Breast Cancer.

Cureus 2016 Jun 7;8(6):e633. Epub 2016 Jun 7.

Department of Surgery, Istanbul University.

Background: Premenopausal breast cancer with a triple-negative phenotype (TNBC) has been associated with inferior locoregional recurrence free survival (LRFS) and overall survival (OS) after breast conserving surgery (BCS). The aim of this study is to analyze the association between age, subtype, and surgical treatment on survival in young women (≤40 years) with early breast cancer in a population with a high rate of breast cancer in young women.

Methods: Three hundred thirty-two patients ≤40 years old with stage I-II invasive breast cancer who underwent surgery at a single institution between 1998 and 2012 were identified retrospectively. Uni- and multivariate analysis evaluated predictors of LRFS, OS, and disease free survival (DFS).

Results: Most patients (64.2%) underwent BCS. Mean age and follow-up time were 35 (25 ± 3.61) years, and 72 months (range, 24-252), respectively. In multivariate analysis, multicentricity/multifocality and young age (<35 years) independently predicted for poorer DFS and OS. Those aged 35-40 years had higher LRFS and DFS than those <35 in the mastectomy group (p=0.007 and p=0.039, respectively). Patients with TNBC had lower OS compared with patients with luminal A subtype (p=0.042), and those who underwent BCS had higher OS than patients after mastectomy (p=0.015).

Conclusion: Young age (< 35 years) is an independent predictor of poorer OS and DFS as compared with ages 35-40, even in countries with a lower average age of breast cancer presentation. In addition, TNBC in the young predicts for poorer OS. BCS can be performed in young patients with TNBC, despite their poorer overall survival.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.633DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4938212PMC
June 2016

The effect of bladder contrast on dose calculation in volumetric modulated arc therapy planning in patients treated for postoperative prostate cancer.

Jpn J Radiol 2016 May 2;34(5):376-82. Epub 2016 Feb 2.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Florence Nightingale Gayrettepe Hospital, Cemil Aslan Güder Sok 8, Floor-1, Gayrettepe, 34349, Istanbul, Turkey.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of contrast agent on dose calculation in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in the post-prostatectomy setting.

Methods And Material: Ten patients were studied. Each patient received planning computed tomography (CT) images with contrast agent. All of the plans were done on virtually simulated contrast-free CT scans. The plan approved by the radiation oncologist was replicated to the contrast CT series. In both of the plans the same monitor unit was used. The doses calculated from the two plans were compared in regard to target volumes and organs at risk. A paired sample t-test was used to evaluate the differences in cumulative dose volume histogram between the two plans.

Results: We showed that the use of contrast agent may cause significant differences in dose distribution. There was a significant decrease in doses received by planning target volume (PTV70), rectum V65 Gy, rectum V40 Gy, bladder V65 Gy, penile bulb V40 Gy in plans with contrast-enhanced CT sets. The decrease in mean, maximum and minimum doses received by PTV70 also contributed to the significant decrease in conformity index.

Conclusions: Using a contrast agent at the time of CT simulation may cause significant differences in dose distribution. For this reason, the plan should always be carried out on non-contrast CT data sets to avoid additional errors in the treatment planning process.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11604-016-0523-9DOI Listing
May 2016

Clinical and histopathological factors associated with Ki-67 expression in breast cancer patients.

Oncol Lett 2015 Mar 7;9(3):1046-1054. Epub 2015 Jan 7.

Department of Breast Surgery, Istanbul Florence Nightingale Hospital, Gayrettepe, Istanbul 34349, Turkey ; Department of General Surgery, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Capa, Istanbul 34390, Turkey.

The aim of the present study was to identify the optimal Ki-67 cut-off value in breast cancer (BC) patients, and investigate the association of Ki-67 expression levels with other prognostic factors. Firstly, a retrospective search was performed to identify patients with stage I-III BC (n=462). A range of Ki-67 index values were then assigned to five groups (<10, 10-14, 15-19, 20-24 and ≥25%). The correlation between the Ki-67 index and other prognostic factors [age, tumor type, histological and nuclear grade, tumor size, multifocality, an component, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER/PR) expression, human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER-2) status, axillary involvement and tumor stage] were investigated in each group. The median Ki-67 value was revealed to be 20% (range, 1-95%). A young age (≤40 years old), tumor type, size and grade, LVI, ER/PR negativity and HER-2 positivity were revealed to be associated with the Ki-67 level. Furthermore, Ki-67 was demonstrated to be negatively correlated with ER/PR expression (P<0.001), but positively correlated with tumor size (P<0.001). The multivariate analysis revealed that a Ki-67 value of ≥15% was associated with the largest number of poor prognostic factors (P=0.036). In addition, a Ki-67 value of ≥15% was identified to be statistically significant in association with certain luminal subtypes. The rate of disease-free survival was higher in patients with luminal A subtype BC (P=0.036). Following the correlation analysis for the Ki-67 index and the other prognostic factors, a Ki-67 value of ≥15% was revealed to be the optimal cut-off level for BC patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/ol.2015.2852DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4315001PMC
March 2015

History of the rare cancer network and past research.

Rare Tumors 2014 Jul 6;6(3):5462. Epub 2014 Aug 6.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic , Rochester, MN, USA.

Approximately, twenty years ago, the Rare Cancer Network (RCN) was formed in Lausanne, Switzerland, to support the study of rare malignancies. The RCN has grown over the years and now includes 130 investigators from twenty-four nations on six continents. The network held its first international symposium in Nice, France, on March 21-22, 2014. The proceedings of that meeting are presented in two companion papers. This manuscript reviews the history of the growth of the RCN and contains the abstracts of fourteen oral presentations made at the meeting of prior RCN studies. From 1993 to 2014, 74 RCN studies have been initiated, of which 54 were completed, 10 are in progress or under analysis, and 9 were stopped due to poor accrual. Forty-four peer reviewed publications have been written on behalf of the RCN.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4081/rt.2014.5462DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4178278PMC
July 2014

Vitamin D levels in patients with breast cancer: importance of dressing style.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2014 ;15(3):1357-62

Department of Radiation Oncology, Gayrettepe Florence Nightingale Hospital, stanbul, Turkey E-mail :

Background: Vitamin D deficiency is a potentially modifiable risk factor that may be targeted for breast cancer (BC) prevention. It may also be related to prognosis after diagnosis and treatment. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency as measured by serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-OHD) levels in patients with BC and to evaluate its correlations with life-style and treatments.

Materials And Methods: This study included 186 patients with stage 0-III BC treated in our breast center between 2010-2013. The correlation between serum baseline 25-OHD levels and supplement usage, age, menopausal status, diabetes mellitus, usage of bisphosphonates, body-mass index (BMI), season, dressing style, administration of systemic treatments and radiotherapy were investigated. The distribution of serum 25-OHD levels was categorized as deficient (<10ng/ ml), insufficient (10-24 ng/ml), and sufficient (25-80 ng/ml).

Results: The median age of the patients was 51 years (range: 27-79 years) and 70% of them had deficient/insufficient 25-OHD levels. On univariate analysis, vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency was more common in patients with none or low dose vitamin D supplementation at the baseline, high BMI (≥25), no bisphosphonate usage, and a conservative dressing style. On multivariate analysis, none or low dose vitamin D supplementation, and decreased sun-exposure due to a conservative dressing style were found as independent factors increasing risk of vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency 28.7 (p=0.002) and 13.4 (p=0.003) fold, respectively.

Conclusions: The prevalence of serum 25-OHD deficiency/insufficiency is high in our BC survivors. Vitamin D status should be routinely evaluated for all women, especially those with a conservative dressing style, as part of regular preventive care, and they should take supplemental vitamin D.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.7314/apjcp.2014.15.3.1357DOI Listing
November 2014

Impact of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer on the long-term quality of life and late side effects: a multicentric clinical evaluation by the Turkish Oncology Group.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2012 ;13(11):5741-6

Department of Radiation Oncology, Gazi University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.

Aim: Although preoperative chemoradiatherapy (CRT) has proven its benefits in terms of decreased toxicity, there is still a considerable amount of cases that do not receive postoperative CRT. Oncologists at different geographic locations still need to know the long-term effects of this treatment in order to manage patients successfully. The current paper reports on long-term quality of life (QOL) and late side effects after adjuvant CRT in rectal cancer patients from 5 centers in Anatolia.

Methods: Rectal cancer patients treated with postoperative CRT with minimum 1-year follow-up and were in complete remission, were evaluated according to RTOG and LENT-SOMA scales. They were also asked to complete Turkish version of EORTCQLQ-C30 questionnaire and the CR-38 module. Each center participated with the required clinical data.

Results: Two hundred and thirty patients with median age of 55 years participated and completed the study. Median follow-up time was 5 years. All patients received RT concomitant with chemotherapy. Common parameters that both increased functional health scales and yielded better symptom scores were long term interval after treatment and sphincter-saving surgery. In addition, surgery type and follow-up time were determined to be predictors of QOL scores and late toxicity grade.

Conclusion: Postoperative CRT was found to have a great impact on the long term QOL and side effects in rectal cancer survivors. The factors that adversely affect these are abdominoperineal resection and shorter interval. The findings may encourage life-long follow-up and cooperation with patients, which should be mentioned during the initial counseling.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.7314/apjcp.2012.13.11.5741DOI Listing
July 2013

Primary pineal tumors: outcome and prognostic factors--a study from the Rare Cancer Network (RCN).

Clin Transl Oncol 2012 Nov 23;14(11):827-34. Epub 2012 Aug 23.

Radiation Oncology, Catalan Institute of Oncology, H. Universitari Germans Trías, Badalona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.

Purpose: To better define outcome and prognostic factors in primary pineal tumors.

Materials And Methods: Thirty-five consecutive patients from seven academic centers of the Rare Cancer Network diagnosed between 1988 and 2006 were included. Median age was 36 years. Surgical resection consisted of biopsy in 12 cases and resection in 21 (2 cases with unknown resection). All patients underwent radiotherapy and 12 patients received also chemotherapy.

Results: Histological subtypes were pineoblastoma (PNB) in 21 patients, pineocytoma (PC) in 8 patients and pineocytoma with intermediate differentiation in 6 patients. Six patients with PNB had evidence of spinal seeding. Fifteen patients relapsed (14 PNB and 1 PC) with PNB cases at higher risk (p = 0.031). Median survival time was not reached. Median disease-free survival was 82 months (CI 50 % 28-275). In univariate analysis, age younger than 36 years was an unfavorable prognostic factor (p = 0.003). Patients with metastases at diagnosis had poorer survival (p = 0.048). Late side effects related to radiotherapy were dementia, leukoencephalopathy or memory loss in seven cases, occipital ischemia in one, and grade 3 seizures in two cases. Side effects related to chemotherapy were grade 3-4 leucopenia in five cases, grade 4 thrombocytopenia in three cases, grade 2 anemia in two cases, grade 4 pancytopenia in one case, grade 4 vomiting in one case and renal failure in one case.

Conclusions: Age and dissemination at diagnosis influenced survival in our series. The prevalence of chronic toxicity suggests that new adjuvant strategies are advisable.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12094-012-0869-0DOI Listing
November 2012

Outcome and prognostic factors in endometrial stromal tumors: a Rare Cancer Network study.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2012 Apr 31;82(5):e757-63. Epub 2012 Jan 31.

Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland.

Purpose: To provide further understanding regarding outcome and prognostic factors of endometrial stromal tumors (EST).

Methods And Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on the records of 59 women diagnosed with EST and treated with curative intent between 1983 and 2007 in the framework of the Rare Cancer Network.

Results: Endometrial stromal sarcomas (ESS) were found in 44% and undifferentiated ESS (UES) in 49% of the cases. In 7% the grading was unclear. Of the total number of patients, 33 had Stage I, 4 Stage II, 20 Stage III, and 1 presented with Stage IVB disease. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 12 patients, all with UES. External-beam radiotherapy (RT) was administered postoperatively to 48 women. The median follow-up was 41.4 months. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate was 96.2% and 64.8% for ESS and UES, respectively, with a corresponding 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate of 49.4% and 43.4%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, adjuvant RT was an independent prognostic factor for OS (p = 0.007) and DFS (p = 0.013). Locoregional control, DFS, and OS were significantly associated with age (≤60 vs. >60 years), grade (ESS vs. UES), and International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage (I-II vs. III-IV). Positive lymph node staging had an impact on OS (p < 0.001).

Conclusion: The prognosis of ESS differed from that of UES. Endometrial stromal sarcomas had an excellent 5-year OS, whereas the OS in UES was rather low. However, half of ESS patients had a relapse. For this reason, adjuvant treatment such as RT should be considered even in low-grade tumors. Multicenter randomized studies are still warranted to establish clear guidelines.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2011.11.005DOI Listing
April 2012

Management of adenoid cystic carcinoma of the breast: a Rare Cancer Network study.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2012 Apr 11;82(5):2118-24. Epub 2011 May 11.

Hôpital de Sion, CHCVs, Sion, Switzerland.

Background: Mammary adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a rare breast cancer. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess prognostic factors and patterns of failure, as well as the role of radiation therapy (RT), in ACC.

Methods: Between January 1980 and December 2007, 61 women with breast ACC were treated at participating centers of the Rare Cancer Network. Surgery consisted of lumpectomy in 41 patients and mastectomy in 20 patients. There were 51(84%) stage pN0 and 10 stage cN0 (16%) patients. Postoperative RT was administered to 40 patients (35 after lumpectomy, 5 after mastectomy).

Results: With a median follow-up of 79 months (range, 6-285), 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 94% (95% confidence interval [CI], 88%-100%) and 82% (95% CI, 71%-93%), respectively. The 5-year locoregional control (LRC) rate was 95% (95% CI, 89%-100%). Axillary lymph node dissection or sentinel node biopsy was performed in 84% of cases. All patients had stage pN0 disease. In univariate analysis, survival was not influenced by the type of surgery or the use of postoperative RT. The 5-year LRC rate was 100% in the mastectomy group versus 93% (95% CI, 83%-100%) in the breast-conserving surgery group, respectively (p = 0.16). For the breast-conserving surgery group, the use of RT significantly correlated with LRC (p = 0.03); the 5-year LRC rates were 95% (95% CI, 86%-100%) for the RT group versus 83% (95% CI, 54%-100%) for the group receiving no RT. No local failures occurred in patients with positive margins, all of whom received postoperative RT.

Conclusion: Breast-conserving surgery is the treatment of choice for patients with ACC breast cancer. Axillary lymph node dissection or sentinel node biopsy might not be recommended. Postoperative RT should be proposed in the case of breast-conserving surgery.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2010.12.008DOI Listing
April 2012

Information for decision making by patients with early-stage prostate cancer: a comparison across 9 countries.

Med Decis Making 2011 Sep-Oct;31(5):754-66. Epub 2011 Jan 27.

Klinik fu¨ r Strahlentherapie, Magdeburg, Germany (HW)

Purpose: To describe decisional roles of patients with early-stage prostate cancer in 9 countries and to compare the information they rated important for decision making (DM).

Method: A survey of recently treated patients was conducted in Canada, Italy, England, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Netherlands, Spain, and Turkey. Participants indicated their decisional role in their actual decision and the role they would prefer now. Each participant also rated (essential/desired/no opinion/avoid) the importance of obtaining answers, between diagnosis and treatment decision, to each of 92 questions. For each essential/desired question, participants specified all purposes for that information (to help them: understand/decide/plan/not sure/other).

Results: A total of 659 patients participated with country-specific response rates between 58%-77%. Between 83%-96% of each country's participants recalled actually taking an active decisional role and, in most countries, that increased slightly if they were to make the decision today; there were no significant differences among countries. There was a small reliable difference in the mean number of questions rated essential for DM across countries. More striking, however, was the wide variability within each country: no question was rated essential for DM by even 50% of its participants but almost every question was rated essential by some.

Conclusions: Almost all participants from each country want to participate in their treatment decisions. Although there are country-specific differences in the amount of information required, wide variation within each country suggests that information that patients feel is essential or desired for DM should be addressed on an individual basis in all countries.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0272989X10395029DOI Listing
January 2012

Nasopharyngeal cancer around the Mediterranean area: role of newer radiation techniques.

Crit Rev Oncol Hematol 2012 Dec 20;84 Suppl 1:e110-4. Epub 2010 Oct 20.

Department of Radiation Oncology, İstanbul University, Cerrahpaşa School of Medicine, İstanbul, Turkey.

Primary radiotherapy has been the mainstay of treatment of patients with nondisseminated nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). Novel techniques, such as intensity modulated and image guided radiotherapy has the capability to generate steep dose gradients, leading to an improved therapeutic index, especially in NPC. Although it is widely accepted as the treatment of choice in NPC in the modern world, in developing countries the financing of these innovative delivery systems still continues to be a major problem. The purpose of this article is to discuss the difficulties one may experience during the transition from 2D way of thinking to the 3D conformal era and to review the clinical outcome and toxicity profile of these promising new radiation techniques.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.critrevonc.2010.05.012DOI Listing
December 2012

Dosimetric comparison of field in field intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique with conformal radiotherapy techniques in breast cancer.

Jpn J Radiol 2010 May 29;28(4):283-9. Epub 2010 May 29.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Florence Nightingale Gayrettepe Hospital, Cemil Aslan Güder Sok 8, Gayrettepe, Istanbul, 34340, Turkey.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to be able to implement the field-in-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (FiF) technique in our daily practice for breast radiotherapy. To do this, we performed a dosimetric comparison.

Materials And Methods: Treatment plans were produced for 20 consecutive patients. FiF plans and conformal radiotherapy (CRT) plans were compared for doses in the planning target volume (PTV), the dose homogeneity index (DHI), doses in irradiated soft tissue outside the target volume (SST), ipsilateral lung and heart doses for left breast irradiation, and the monitor unit counts (MU) required for treatment. Averaged values were compared using Student's t-test.

Results: With FiF, the DHI is improved 7.0% and 5.7%, respectively (P < 0.0001) over the bilateral and lateral wedge CRT techniques. When the targeted volumes received 105% and 110% of the prescribed dose in the PTV were compared, significant decreases are found with the FiF technique. With the 105% dose, the SST, heart, and ipsilateral lung doses and the MU counts were also significantly lower with the FiF technique.

Conclusion: The FiF technique, compared to CRT, for breast radiotherapy enables significantly better dose distribution in the PTV. Significant differences are also found for soft tissue volume, the ipsilateral lung dose, and the heart dose. Considering the decreased MUs needed for treatment, the FiF technique is preferred over tangential CRT.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11604-010-0423-3DOI Listing
May 2010

Prostatic duct adenocarcinoma: clinical characteristics, treatment options, and outcomes - a Rare Cancer Network study.

Onkologie 2010 19;33(4):169-73. Epub 2010 Mar 19.

Istanbul Bilim University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul, Turkey.

Background: To evaluate the clinical characteristics, contemporary treatment options, and outcome of prostatic duct adenocarcinoma (PDA), we initiated a Rare Cancer Network (RCN) study.

Materials And Methods: Six member institutions of the RCN collected clinical data on 31 patients. Treatment consisted of definitive radiotherapy in 14 patients and radical prostatectomy in 16 patients. One patient was treated with androgen deprivation alone. The mean follow-up period was 56 months.

Results: Of the 14 patients managed with radiotherapy, 1 patient developed bone metastases and died of prostate cancer, and 1 patient had a biochemical relapse 8 years after definitive radiotherapy. Of the 16 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy, 2 patients developed bone metastases, one of who died of disease. Three patients that relapsed after prostatectomy were successfully salvaged with radiotherapy. The patient that was treated with androgen deprivation alone developed bone metastases at 10 months, was treated with chemotherapy, and was alive after 22 months.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that PDA is a cancer with a behavior similar to that of high Gleason grade acinar carcinoma. Good local control can be achieved by either radiation or surgery. Postoperative radiotherapy seems to work as an adjuvant or salvage treatment, and most tumors appear to respond to androgen deprivation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000288710DOI Listing
July 2010

Information needs of early-stage prostate cancer patients: a comparison of nine countries.

Radiother Oncol 2010 Mar 28;94(3):328-33. Epub 2010 Jan 28.

Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen's University, Kingston, Canada.

Background And Purpose: Providing information to patients can improve their medical and psychological outcomes. We sought to identify core information needs common to most early-stage prostate cancer patients in participating countries.

Material And Methods: Convenience samples of patients treated 3-24 months earlier were surveyed in Canada, England, Italy, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Netherlands, Spain, and Turkey. Each participant rated the importance of addressing each of 92 questions in the diagnosis-to-treatment decision interval (essential/desired/no opinion/avoid). Multivariate modelling determined the extent of variance accounted by covariates, and produced an unbiased prediction of the proportion of essential responses for each question.

Results: Six hundred and fifty-nine patients responded (response rates 45-77%). On average, 35-53 questions were essential within each country; similar questions were essential to most patients in most countries. Beyond cross-country similarities, each country showed wide variability in the number and which questions were essential. Multivariate modelling showed an adjusted R-squared with predictors country, age, education, and treatment group of only 6% of the variance. A core of 20 questions were predicted to be essential to >2/3 of patients.

Conclusions: Core information can be identified across countries. However, providing the core should only be a first step; each country should then provide information tailored to the needs of the individual patient.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.radonc.2009.12.038DOI Listing
March 2010

Insufficiency fractures after pelvic radiotherapy in patients with prostate cancer.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2010 Jul 29;77(3):818-23. Epub 2009 Oct 29.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul Bilim University, Istanbul, Turkey.

Purpose: To assess the incidence, predisposing factors, and clinical characteristics of insufficiency fractures (IF) in patients with prostate cancer, who received pelvic radiotherapy as part of their definitive treatment.

Methods And Materials: The charts of 134 prostate cancer patients, who were treated with pelvic radiotherapy between 1998 and 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. IF was diagnosed by bone scan and/or CT and/or MRI. The cumulative incidence of symptomatic IF was estimated by actuarial methods.

Results: Eight patients were identified with symptomatic IF after a median follow-up period of 68 months (range, 12-116 months). The 5-year cumulative incidence of symptomatic IF was 6.8%. All patients presented with lower back pain. Insufficiency fracture developed at a median time of 20 months after the end of radiotherapy and was managed conservatively without any need for hospitalization. Three patients were thought to have metastatic disease because of increased uptake in their bone scans. However, subsequent CT and MR imaging revealed characteristic changes of IF, avoiding any further intervention. No predisposing factors for development of IF could be identified.

Conclusions: Pelvic IF is a rare complication of pelvic radiotherapy in prostate cancer. Knowledge of pelvic IF is essential to rule out metastatic disease and prevent unnecessary treatment, especially in a patient cohort with high-risk features for distant spread.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.05.059DOI Listing
July 2010

Patterns of care for lung cancer in radiation oncology departments of Turkey.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2008 Dec 15;72(5):1530-7. Epub 2008 Aug 15.

Dokuz Eylul University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Izmir, Turkey.

Purpose: To determine the patterns of care for lung cancer in Turkish radiation oncology centers.

Methods And Materials: Questionnaire forms from 21 of 24 (87.5%) centers that responded were evaluated.

Results: The most frequent histology was non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (81%). The most common postoperative radiotherapy (RT) indications were close/(+) surgical margins (95%) and presence of pN2 disease (91%). The most common indications for postoperative chemotherapy (CHT) were ">/= IB" disease (19%) and the presence of pN2 disease (19%). In Stage IIIA potentially resectable NSCLC, the most frequent treatment approach was neoadjuvant concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CHRT) (57%). In Stage IIIA unresectable and Stage IIIB disease, the most frequent approach was definitive concomitant CHRT (91%). In limited SCLC, the most common treatment approach was concomitant CHRT with cisplatin+etoposide for cycles 1-3, completion of CHT to cycles 4-6, and finally prophylactic cranial irradiation in patients with complete response (71%). Six cycles of cisplatin + etoposide CHT and palliative thoracic RT, when required, was the most commonly used treatment (81%) in extensive SCLC. Sixty-two percent of centers did not have endobronchial brachytherapy (EBB) facilities.

Conclusion: There is great variation in diagnostic testing, treatment strategies, indications for postoperative RT and CHT, RT features, and EBB availability for LC cases. To establish standards, national guidelines should be prepared using a multidisciplinary approach.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.03.035DOI Listing
December 2008

Outcome and prognostic factors in cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme in adults: a retrospective study from the Rare Cancer Network.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2006 Sep 11;66(1):179-86. Epub 2006 Jul 11.

University Hospital of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the outcome in patients with cerebellar glioblastoma (GBM) treated in 15 institutions of the Rare Cancer Network.

Methods And Materials: Data from a series of 45 adult patients with cerebellar GBM were collected in a retrospective multicenter study. Median age was 50.3 years. Brainstem invasion was observed in 9 (20%) patients. Radiotherapy (RT) was administered to 36 patients (with concomitant chemotherapy, 7 patients). Adjuvant chemotherapy after RT was administered in 8 patients. Median RT dose was 59.4 Gy. Median follow-up was 7.2 months (range, 3.4-39.0).

Results: The 1-year and 2-year actuarial overall survival rate was 37.8% and 14.7%, respectively, and was significantly influenced by salvage treatment (p = 0.048), tumor volume (p = 0.044), extent of neurosurgical resection (p = 0.019), brainstem invasion (p = 0.0013), additional treatment after surgery (p < 0.001), and completion of the initial treatment (p < 0.001) on univariate analysis. All patients experienced local progression: 8 and 22 had progression with and without a distant failure, respectively. The 1- and 2-year actuarial progression free survival was 25% and 10.7%, respectively, and was significantly influenced by brainstem invasion (p = 0.002), additional treatment after surgery (p = 0.0016), and completion of the initial treatment (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, survival was negatively influenced by the extent of surgery (p = 0.03) and brainstem invasion (p = 0.02).

Conclusions: In this multicenter retrospective study, the observed pattern of failure was local in all cases, but approximately 1 patient of 4 presented with an extracerebellar component. Brainstem invasion was observed in a substantial number of patients and was an adverse prognostic factor.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.04.035DOI Listing
September 2006