Publications by authors named "Sedat Koca"

13 Publications

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The Effect of Thoracic Radiotherapy on the Quality of Life in Lung Cancer Patients.

Cureus 2021 Mar 13;13(3):e13870. Epub 2021 Mar 13.

Radiation Oncology Clinic, Bahçeşehir University Medical Park Göztepe Hospital, Istanbul, TUR.

Introduction This study aimed to investigate changes in respiratory symptoms and quality of life (QoL) in patients with locally advanced and metastatic lung cancer receiving thoracic radiotherapy (RT). We investigated the correlation between the level of symptom relief and tumor response. Methods Thirty-two patients were included in this study. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life (QoL) Questionnaire (QLQ)-C30 and EORTC QLQ-LC13 were used to investigate QoL changes. Assessments were performed on the first day of RT, on the last day of RT, routinely monthly follow-ups, and three months after RT. Results The median age of the patients was 62; 88% of the patients were male. For the symptom scale, fatigue and dyspnea provided significant improvement at the end of RT (p=0.000, p=0.047). No significant improvement was observed at the end of RT in pain and insomnia. While coughing showed substantial improvement at the end of RT (p=0.004), the maximum improvement was achieved during the third-month follow-up (p<0.001). No significant improvement was observed at the end of RT in hemoptysis, but a considerable improvement was observed during the third-month follow-up (p=0.008). Conclusion This study confirms that RT offered palliation of respiratory symptoms and improved QoL in a substantial proportion of patients with lung cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.13870DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8041296PMC
March 2021

The Role of Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Primary or Recurrent Desmoid Tumors and Long-Term Results.

Balkan Med J 2016 May 1;33(3):316-21. Epub 2016 May 1.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul University Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey.

Background: Desmoid tumors are uncommon and benign mesenchymal neoplasms. The optimal treatment of patients with desmoid tumors is still controversial. Surgery is the primary treatment for locally invasive or recurrent desmoid tumors. Also, radiotherapy is a treatment option for patients at high risk for local failure such as those with positive margins or recurrent and unresectable tumors.

Aims: To report our institutional experience and long-term results of patients with desmoid tumors who received radiotherapy.

Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study.

Methods: Between 1980 and 2009, 20 patients who received radiotherapy (RT) in our institution were analyzed. The majority of patients (80%) were referred with a recurrent tumor after previous surgery. Thirteen patients underwent marginal resection, 4 had wide local excision and 3 patients had only biopsy. Resection margin was positive in 15 (75%) patients. All patients received radiation therapy. The median prescribed dose was 60 Gy. Five patients received less than 54 Gy.

Results: The median follow-up time was 77.5 months (28-283 months). Nine patients developed local recurrence after RT. Seven local failures (78%) were in field. Time to local recurrence ranged from 3-165 months (median 33 months). The 2-5 year local control (LC) rates were 80% and 69%, respectively. On univariate analysis, the 5 year local control rate was significantly better in the patients treated with ≥54 Gy than in patients who received <54 Gy (p=0.023). The most common acute side effect was grade 1-2 skin toxicity. As a late side effect of radiotherapy, soft tissue fibrosis was detected in 10 patients and lymphangitis was seen in 1 patient. One patient developed radiation-induced sarcoma.

Conclusion: According to our results, radiotherapy is especially effective in recurrent disease and provides a high local control rate in the patients received more than 54 Gy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5152/balkanmedj.2016.140560DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4898991PMC
May 2016

Synovial sarcoma with multiple vertebrae metastases causing multilevel thoracic spinal cord compressions.

Spine J 2016 06 8;16(6):e363-4. Epub 2015 Dec 8.

Department of Internal Medicine, Bahçeşehir University School of Medicine, Goztepe Medical Park Hospital, Goztepe Medikal Park Hastanesi E5 Üzeri 23 Nisan Sok. No: 17 Merdivenköy Kadıköy, Istanbul, 34732, Turkey.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.spinee.2015.11.063DOI Listing
June 2016

Long-term treatment results in soft tissue sarcomas of the thoracic wall treated with pre-or-postoperative radiotherapy--a single institution experience.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2014 ;15(22):9949-53

Department of Radiation Oncology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Turkey E-mail :

Objective: To evaluate the long term results among patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the thoracic wall.

Materials And Methods: Twenty-six patients who were treated with pre-or postoperative radiotherapy between December 1980-December 2007, with a diagnosis of soft tissue sarcoma of the thoracic wall were retrospectively evaluated.

Results: The median age was 44 years (14-85 years) and 15 of them were male. A total of 50% of patients were grade 3. The most common histologic type of tumor was undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (26.9%). Tumor size varied between 2-25 cm (median 6.5 cm). Seventeen of the cases had marginal and 9 had wide local resection. Four cases received preoperative radiotherapy and 22 postoperative radiotherapy. Six of the patients with large and high grade tumors received chemotherapy. Median follow-up time was 82 months (9-309 months). Local recurrence and metastasis was detected in 34.6% and 42.3% of patients, respectively. Five- year local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and disease-specific survival (DSS) were 62%, 38%, 69%, and 76% respectively. On univariate analysis, the patients with positive surgical margins had a markedly lower 5-year LC rate than patients with negative surgical margin, but the difference was not significant (43% vs 78%, p=0.1). Five-year DFS (66% vs 17%) and DSS (92% vs 60%) rates were significantly worse for the patients who had high grade tumors (p=0.01, p=0.008 respectively).

Conclusions: Tumor grade and surgical margin are essential parameters for determining the prognosis of thoracic wall soft tissue sarcoma both in our series and the literature.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7314/apjcp.2014.15.22.9949DOI Listing
August 2015

Does rectum and bladder dose vary during the course of image-guided radiotherapy in the postprostatectomy setting?

Tumori 2014 Sep-Oct;100(5):529-35

Aims And Background: To assess the variations in actual doses delivered to the rectum and bladder in the course of postprostatectomy radiotherapy using kilovoltage-cone-beam computed tomography datasets acquired during image-guided radiotherapy.

Methods And Study Design: Twenty consecutive patients treated with intensity-modulated or intensity-modulated arc therapy to the prostate bed were retrospectively evaluated. Both the planning tomography and kilovoltage-cone-beam computed tomography were acquired with an empty rectum and a half-full bladder. Target localization was performed on the basis of soft tissue matching using cone-beam computed tomography scans before each treatment fraction. A total of 16 cone-beam computed tomography scans per patient (acquired at the first 5 fractions and twice weekly thereafter) were used for the assessments. The bladder and rectum were re-contoured offline on each cone-beam computed tomography scan by a single physician, and the delivered doses were recalculated. The variations in certain dose-volume parameters for the rectum and bladder (BD2cc, RD 2cc, V40%, V50%, V60%, V65%) were analyzed using the paired t test.

Results: Most of the dose volume variations for rectum and bladder were significantly higher than predicted (P <0.05) for the 320 kilovoltage-cone-beam computed tomography sets, except for the doses received by 2 cc of the bladder and V50 and V60 of the rectum. The dose-volume parameters of the bladder did not meet our criteria of V65 ≤25% and V40 ≤50% in 10% and 20% of the patients, respectively. None of the dose-volume histograms showed rectal V65 ≥17%; however, the rectal V40 ≤35% dose constraint was not met in 11 patients. For all patients, the ANOVA test revealed no significant difference between the variations.

Conclusion: Actual doses delivered during treatment were found to be higher than predicted, but the majority of calculated bladder and rectal doses remained in the limits of our plan acceptance criteria. Interfraction variability of the rectum and bladder is a major concern in the postprostatectomy radiotherapy setting, even when patients are instructed about rectal and bladder preparation before the radiotherapy course. Image guidance with cone-beam computed tomography at each treatment fraction may offer a viable tool to account for interfraction variations of the rectum and bladder throughout the treatment course.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1700/1660.18172DOI Listing
December 2014

Non-metastatic Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors of bone in adolescents and adults: prognostic factors and clinical outcome-single institution results.

Tumori 2014 Jul-Aug;100(4):452-8

Aims And Background: There is limited data regarding outcomes of Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors in adolescents and adults compared with the same tumors in childhood. The aim of the study was to analyze prognostic factors and treatment results in a cohort of adolescents and adults with non-metastatic skeletal Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors.

Methods And Study Design: From 1992-2008, 90 adolescents and adults with Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors of the bone were referred to our institution. Sixty-five (72%) non-metastatic patients with analyzable data and treated in our institution were retrospectively evaluated. All patients were treated with alternated chemotherapy regimens administered every 3 weeks. The local treatment modality was selected according to tumor and patient characteristics.

Results: The median age was 21 years (range, 13-50). Most patients (74%) were >17 years of age. Forty-six percent of the tumors were located in the extremities. Local therapy was surgery in 45 patients and radiotherapy alone in 19 patients. Twenty-one patients received preoperative and 13 patients postoperative radiotherapy. Median follow-up was 43 months (range, 7-167). The 5-year event-free and overall survival rates for all patients were 44% and 49%, respectively. On univariate survival analysis, event-free and overall survival were worse for patients >17 years of age, tumor size >8 cm in diameter, an axial location, positive surgical margins, and poor histopathological response (<90% necrosis). Age, tumor site and tumor size on event-free and overall survival remained significant on multivariate analysis.

Conclusions: We identified age, tumor size, and tumor site as independent prognostic factors, in accord with the Western literature. These patients require novel treatment modalities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1700/1636.17910DOI Listing
December 2014

Neoadjuvant treatment with preoperative radiotherapy for extremity soft tissue sarcomas: long-term results from a single institution in Turkey.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2014 ;15(4):1775-81

Department of Radiation Oncology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey E-mail :

Background: To assess the long term clinical outcome of preoperative radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy followed by limb sparing surgery in patients with non-metastatic soft tissue sarcomas (STS) of the extremities.

Materials And Methods: Sixty patients with locally advanced STS were retrospectively analyzed. The median tumor diameter was 12 cm. All patients were treated with preoperative radiotherapy delivered with two different fractionation schedules (35Gy/10fr or 46-50Gy/23-25fr). Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was added to 44 patients with large and/or high grade tumors. Surgery was performed 2-6 weeks after radiotherapy. Chemotherapy was completed up to 6 courses after surgery in patients who had good responses.

Results: Median follow-up time was 67 months (8-268 months). All of the patients had limb sparing surgery. The 5-year local control (LC), disease free (DFS) and overall survival (OSS) rates for all of the patients were 81%, 48.1% and 68.3% respectively. 5-year LC, DFS and cause specific survival (CSS) were 81.7%, 47%, 69.8%, and 80%, 60%, 60% in the chemoradiotherapy and radiotherapy groups, respectively. On univariate analysis, patients who were treated with hypofractionation experienced significantly superior LC, DFS and CSS rates with similar rates of late toxicity when compared with patients who were treated with conventional fractionation and statistical significance was retained on multivariate analysis.

Conclusions: Treatment results are consistent with the literature. As neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy provides effective LC and CSS with acceptable morbidity, it should be preferred for patients with large and borderline resectable STS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7314/apjcp.2014.15.4.1775DOI Listing
November 2014

Extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors in adults: prognostic factors and clinical outcome.

Jpn J Clin Oncol 2012 May 12;42(5):420-6. Epub 2012 Mar 12.

Department of Medical Oncology, Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul, Turkey.

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate prognostic factors, survival rate and the efficacy of the treatment modalities used in patients with extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma.

Methods: Data of patients with extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma followed up at our center between 1997 and 2010 were retrospectively analyzed.

Results: The median age of 27 patients was 24 years (range, 16-54 years). The median follow-up was 31.8 months (range, 6-144 months). Tumor size was between 1.5 and 14 cm (median: 8 cm). Eighty-five percent of patients had localized disease at presentation and 15% had metastatic disease. Local therapy was surgery alone in 16% of patients, surgery combined with radiotherapy in 42% and radiotherapy alone in 27%. All patients were treated with vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide and actinomycin-D, alternating with ifosfamide and etoposide every 3 weeks. In patients with localized disease at presentation, the 5-year event-free survival and overall survival were 59.7 and 64.5%, respectively. At univariate analysis, patients with tumor size ≥ 8 cm, high serum lactate dehydrogenase, metastasis at presentation, poor histological response to chemotherapy and positive surgical margin had significantly worse event-free survival. The significant predictors of worse overall survival at univariate analysis were tumor size 8 ≥ cm, high lactate dehydrogenase, metastasis at presentation, poor histological response to chemotherapy, radiotherapy only as local treatment and positive surgical margin.

Conclusions: Prognostic factors were similar to primary osseous Ewing's sarcomas. Adequate surgical resection, aggressive chemotherapy (vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide and actinomycin-D alternating with ifosfamide and etoposide) and radiotherapy if indicated are the recommended therapy for patients with extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jjco/hys027DOI Listing
May 2012

Prostatic duct adenocarcinoma: clinical characteristics, treatment options, and outcomes - a Rare Cancer Network study.

Onkologie 2010 19;33(4):169-73. Epub 2010 Mar 19.

Istanbul Bilim University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul, Turkey.

Background: To evaluate the clinical characteristics, contemporary treatment options, and outcome of prostatic duct adenocarcinoma (PDA), we initiated a Rare Cancer Network (RCN) study.

Materials And Methods: Six member institutions of the RCN collected clinical data on 31 patients. Treatment consisted of definitive radiotherapy in 14 patients and radical prostatectomy in 16 patients. One patient was treated with androgen deprivation alone. The mean follow-up period was 56 months.

Results: Of the 14 patients managed with radiotherapy, 1 patient developed bone metastases and died of prostate cancer, and 1 patient had a biochemical relapse 8 years after definitive radiotherapy. Of the 16 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy, 2 patients developed bone metastases, one of who died of disease. Three patients that relapsed after prostatectomy were successfully salvaged with radiotherapy. The patient that was treated with androgen deprivation alone developed bone metastases at 10 months, was treated with chemotherapy, and was alive after 22 months.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that PDA is a cancer with a behavior similar to that of high Gleason grade acinar carcinoma. Good local control can be achieved by either radiation or surgery. Postoperative radiotherapy seems to work as an adjuvant or salvage treatment, and most tumors appear to respond to androgen deprivation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000288710DOI Listing
July 2010

The role of amifostine on late normal tissue damage induced by pelvic radiotherapy with concomitant gemcitabine: an in vivo study.

Med Oncol 2009 Dec 30;26(4):402-8. Epub 2008 Nov 30.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Cerrahpaşa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Fatih, 34303 Istanbul, Turkey.

In this in vivo study, we aimed to assess the radioprotective effect of amifostine on late normal tissue damage induced by gemcitabine concomitant with pelvic radiotherapy by histopathological and quantitative methods. Fifty-six male Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into seven experimental groups as follows: (I) gemcitabine, (II) radiation + gemcitabine, (III) radiation + gemcitabine + amifostine, (IV) radiation + amifostine, (V) sham radiation, (VI) amifostine, (VII) radiation. Irradiation was given to pelvic region with a dose of 25 Gy in 5 fractions. Amifostine was given for 30 min; gemcitabine was administered 24 h before the first fraction of radiotherapy. All animals were killed at the end of 4th month. Pathological examination was performed and the tissue collagen content was measured in bladder and rectal tissues. Fifty-one animals that were alive at the end of the follow-up period were analyzed. Thirty-five animals (68.6%) revealed grades I-III late effect in histopathological examination. We observed grade III colitis in 1 animal (radiation + gemcitabine) and bladder fibrosis in 4 animals (radiation and radiation + gemcitabine groups). There was no significant difference between any groups for bladder cystitis and fibrosis by Kruskal-Wallis method. Colitis was seen significantly lower in the radiation + gemcitabine + amifostine group (P = 0.0005). The collagen contents in the bladder and rectum of radiation and radiation + gemcitabine groups were markedly increased as compared to the sham group. This effect was reversed in the groups which received amifostine in addition to radiation and radiation + gemcitabine groups, but this difference was not significant. This study demonstrated that amifostine may have a beneficial effect in limiting rectal colitis from the radiosensitizing effect of gemcitabine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12032-008-9136-1DOI Listing
December 2009

Patterns of care for lung cancer in radiation oncology departments of Turkey.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2008 Dec 15;72(5):1530-7. Epub 2008 Aug 15.

Dokuz Eylul University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Izmir, Turkey.

Purpose: To determine the patterns of care for lung cancer in Turkish radiation oncology centers.

Methods And Materials: Questionnaire forms from 21 of 24 (87.5%) centers that responded were evaluated.

Results: The most frequent histology was non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (81%). The most common postoperative radiotherapy (RT) indications were close/(+) surgical margins (95%) and presence of pN2 disease (91%). The most common indications for postoperative chemotherapy (CHT) were ">/= IB" disease (19%) and the presence of pN2 disease (19%). In Stage IIIA potentially resectable NSCLC, the most frequent treatment approach was neoadjuvant concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CHRT) (57%). In Stage IIIA unresectable and Stage IIIB disease, the most frequent approach was definitive concomitant CHRT (91%). In limited SCLC, the most common treatment approach was concomitant CHRT with cisplatin+etoposide for cycles 1-3, completion of CHT to cycles 4-6, and finally prophylactic cranial irradiation in patients with complete response (71%). Six cycles of cisplatin + etoposide CHT and palliative thoracic RT, when required, was the most commonly used treatment (81%) in extensive SCLC. Sixty-two percent of centers did not have endobronchial brachytherapy (EBB) facilities.

Conclusion: There is great variation in diagnostic testing, treatment strategies, indications for postoperative RT and CHT, RT features, and EBB availability for LC cases. To establish standards, national guidelines should be prepared using a multidisciplinary approach.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.03.035DOI Listing
December 2008

The role of preoperative radiotherapy in nonmetastatic high-grade osteosarcoma of the extremities for limb-sparing surgery.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2005 Jul;62(3):820-8

Department of Radiation Oncology, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.

Purpose: To assess the role of preoperative radiotherapy in patients with nonmetastatic high-grade osteosarcoma of the extremities for limb-sparing surgery and to compare the response of neoadjuvant therapies, local control, and survival with the literature results.

Methods And Materials: Forty-six patients with osteosarcoma of the limbs who were treated within a limb salvage protocol including preoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy between 1987 and 2002, were retrospectively analyzed. Median age was 17 years (range, 14-66 years). Treatment was started with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Cisplatin, epidoxorubicin, ifosfamide, and methotrexate were used in different combinations. Preoperative radiotherapy was applied, usually between the second and third cycle of chemotherapy. Radiotherapy was given (35 Gy in 10 fractions) to 44 patients. Two patients were treated with 46 Gy at 2 Gy/day. Definitive surgery was administered after the third course of chemotherapy. Chemotherapy was complete 6 courses postsurgery.

Results: Median follow-up time was 44 months (range, 2-154 months). Forty-four patients had limb-sparing surgery, whereas 2 had amputation. Tumor necrosis rate was >/=90% in 87% of the patients (Huvos Grade 3-4). Two patients had local failures, and 26 patients (56.5%) had distant metastases. The 5-year local control and overall survival rates were 97.5% and 48.4%, respectively. On univariate analysis, age
Conclusion: Preoperative radiotherapy helps to increase the chance of extremity-sparing surgery with good local control and necrosis rate when combined with chemotherapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2004.11.006DOI Listing
July 2005